ChildFund International Blog

Day of the Girl: Hope for Mung

Mung of Vietnam

By ChildFund Australia and ChildFund Vietnam staff

Oct. 11 is the International Day of the Girl Child, a day set aside by the United Nations to recognize girls’ rights and the special challenges they face. This year, its theme is The Power of the Adolescent Girl: Vision for 2030, so ChildFund’s blog will focus this week on girls who are working to achieve great things now and in the future.   

Thirteen-year-old Mung was born in one of the poorest villages in Kim Boi district in rural Vietnam’s mountains, and even here, she’s had a difficult life compared to many children.

Mung’s father passed away when she was young, and her mother has a disability and is unable to work. She struggles to provide for Mung’s needs with the approximately US$13 she receives from the Vietnamese government each month.

Her uncle tries to support Mung and her mother, as well as his own wife and two children. His rice fields produce enough rice to feed the family and pay for their basic daily expenses, but if a crop fails, they will be hungry for several months.

“When I get home from school, I feed the pigs, clean the house and cook for my mom to help her,” Mung says.

Mung has just completed seventh grade. She has a passion for learning and is a good student, despite having to borrow schoolbooks from her friends to follow the lessons. Also, her house is more than four miles from school, so it often took Mung and her cousin two hours to walk to school each day.

“I used to have to leave home at 5 a.m. to be at class on time,” she says. “It was so dark and freezing.”

Mung and her mother.

Mung and her mother.

In 2013, ChildFund Vietnam staff members identified Mung as being at great risk of dropping out of school due to her family’s financial situation. So, Mung was among 200 children in her village who received bicycles through the Hope Bike project, which was funded by KB Financial Group in partnership with ChildFund Korea and ChildFund Vietnam. She was also enrolled in a project designed to offer support to families struggling to provide for their children’s school needs.

Through the project, Mung receives paper and clothing for school, her fees are covered by direct transfer to her school, and she receives a daily meal to ensure her dietary needs are met.

“ChildFund’s support has helped to reduce the burden on my uncle,” Mung says. “He has been really tired taking care of the two families. Now he doesn’t have to worry about the expense to send me to school. I am provided with tuition fees, course books, a desk and lamps to study at home. I also get rice for meals every month. I feel like I am getting closer to my dream.”

Despite her challenges, Mung always tries her best to study hard, and her efforts are showing. She recently took part in a mathematics competition in her district and received an “encouragement award.” Everyone in the community is proud of her.

“I would like to become a teacher in the future to earn enough money to support my mom,” Mung says. “My goal next school year is to improve my grades in Vietnamese. Any teacher should be good at Vietnamese to convey what she means to her students.”

Protecting the Most Vulnerable — Refugee Children

“The children of Syria have lost their lives and homes and schooling and innocence — they have lost the precious and fleeting years we call childhood. Children deserve the right to be children, and we must make this as much a priority as every other consideration during this tragedy. The issues surrounding the entire situation are complex and nuanced, but our overriding imperative must be to protect children from the failures of adults.”

Read more from ChildFund President & CEO Anne Goddard’s Huffington Post column this month.


Women_and_children_among_Syrian_refugees_striking_at_the_platform_of_Budapest_Keleti_railway_station._Refugee_crisis._Budapest,_Hungary,_Central_Europe,_4_September_2015._(3) (1)

Women and children among Syrian refugees striking at the platform of Keleti railway station in Budapest, September 2015. By Mstyslav Chernov (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.


In Dominica, Resilience in the Face of Destruction

By Federico Diaz-Albertini, Americas Region Program Manager

Federico traveled to Dominica following Tropical Storm Erika. Flooding and landslides have caused major damage to the entire country, and at least 11 people lost their lives. Nineteen more people are missing and presumed dead. Authorities there say it’s the worst disaster to hit Dominica in 30 years. Read more about the storm’s aftermath on ChildFund’s emergency updates page.

Willma shows ChildFund staff her home, which was devastated by a mudslide.

Willma shows ChildFund staff her home, which was devastated by a mudslide.

On Aug. 27, a tropical storm decided to visit the island of Dominica. Unlike many of the storms that pass by this tranquil Caribbean nation, Erika parked itself above the island and deposited approximately 12 inches of rain during 12 hours.

The after-effects included widespread damage to infrastructure, water systems, crops, houses and, most importantly, people’s lives.  Approximately 300 families were moved to shelters; many others were cut off from access roads. At least one community, Petite Savant, has been declared too risky to rebuild houses there. Most of the population has been touched in one way or other by the disaster.

While it is easy to see the general damage, one can only get the real feel and emotion of the situation while visiting families that have been most severely hurt by the storm. This became evident a little while after we arrived to the community of Marigot on the northeastern side of Dominica.

What we found at first was a smiling lady, Willma Stevenson, and her mother welcoming us.  As we made small talk and told jokes, we did not anticipate what we would encounter when visiting her house. The house had been devastated by the force of a mudslide from a cliff behind it. This area had never really seemed at risk of such destruction, but the heavy rains dramatically changed that.

In an instant, a home for a family of five, including three sponsored children, was uninhabitable, a structure that contained only the memories and personal effects of its members.

Luckily, Willma and the children were able to escape the house uninjured and are living with relatives. The children are doing well but are still affected by the sound of rain and the memories of the mudslide that took their house. Willma says she is grateful for her job in a nearby town, and she looks forward to establishing her family in a place where another natural disaster will not uproot them.

Your donations to ChildFund’s Emergency Action Fund help families recover from natural disasters.

My Favorite Book

During our month-long focus on literacy, ChildFund staff members asked children in Asia, Africa and the Americas to tell them about their favorite books and why they love them. You can support children’s reading habits in a couple of ways: ChildFund’s Just Read! program in the United States, or helping ship textbooks to schools overseas. Enjoy the pictures, too!



Brazil: Agatha is 6 years old, and she loves to read and dance ballet. At the local partner organization where she spends time, Sorriso da Criança (Smile of the Child), she often goes to the library.

“My favorite story is The Princess and the Frog,” Agatha says. “Because there’s a princess, and to me she is the best character. The frog falls in love with a princess, and after all, she discovers that he is a prince. In the end, they live together forever.”



“Before I could read, I used to ask my father to read stories for me. Now I can read by myself and I love it. I would say to all the children in the world: If you can, go to a library, it’s so cool!”

Philippines: “I always go to the library during my free time,” says Jamil. “I love looking through books about animals, like the hippopotamus. I wish to become a wildlife photographer someday.”

Bolivia: Reyna is 11 years old. She loves short stories like Aesop’s fables.

United States: Anastasia, 8, of Cheyenne River, South Dakota, received a princess book and a “pillow pet” from her sponsor, so she read the book to her new pet.

Brazil: Jéssica, 10, is a shy girl who loves to read. Her favorite book is Diary of a Wimpy Kid. “I really love to read, especially in my home. But the library is also very important in my life.”

Sierra Leone: Saio, 11, lives in Koinadugu District. “I am in class five. My favorite story book is The African Tea Pot.”

Sri Lanka: Sarujan, 10, loves to read under the shade of the mango tree in his garden. He likes comic books the best because they have lots of pictures.

“My favorite story is about animals living together in peace, in the jungle,” he says, explaining that he likes it because the animals live in harmony in their jungle home without conflicts or disturbances. “My grandmother tells the best stories,” he adds.

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Bikes and Education Mean Freedom


Maria (right) and her Dream Bike.

By Nyararai Magudu, ChildFund Mozambique Program Director

Maria enthusiastically picked up her school bag. Although it’s dirty and worn out, she clutched it close to her chest. Inside were a few workbooks without covers, a 30-cm ruler, a pen and a pencil. She lives in a remote and poor province in Mozambique with her parents, three younger sisters and two younger brothers.

Maria, 15, hoped for many things: a box with a compass, rulers and other mathematical tools, colored pens, a big rubber eraser, a scientific calculator, a student dictionary, even a computer. What a wish list. Poverty’s grip had often made her life miserable, she sometimes thought.

Anyway, it was a new day, she remembered, a school day, which came with new hopes and possibilities. Maria loves school more than anything. This morning, she grabbed her new bike, which came from ChildFund’s Dream Bike program, and rode majestically to school.

I used to be the last to arrive in class. Most of the time I missed the first lessons, or I dozed. Now, everything has changed.

Before she received the bike, Maria used to leave her home at dawn to walk six miles to school and often returned after dark. Although she was never physically abused during the daily journey, there have been several stories of girls who have been attacked and hurt in Maria’s district, Zavala, where ChildFund has worked since 2006.

Now, instead of waking at 4 a.m. and trekking three hours to school, Maria has an hour-long journey. It’s still a long way, but she considers herself lucky.

“I used to arrive at school weary. The 10 kilometers was a long walk to freedom,” Maria chuckled. “Yes, education is freedom!”

When she walked to school, Maria often had to take 10 minutes to clean the dust and sweat off her face, arms and legs, making her even later to school.

“I used to be the last to arrive in class,” she recalled. “Most of the time I missed the first lessons, or I dozed. Now, everything has changed. It only requires me one hour to get to school. I’m investing more time now in my studies, and I can sleep for another hour. I can study for another hour, and I can ride to school for only an hour. I’m no longer weary; no more dozing. The benefits are beyond imagination.

“These are tangible benefits. There are also other ones,” Maria added. “My grades improved tremendously as soon as I got the bike. I developed high self-esteem. Some people who used to laugh at my poverty started to respect me. I was nominated to be a prefect* in my class after I got a bike. Believe me, I´m now a public figure in the school!”

*Prefects are students who are left in charge of the class when the teacher has to leave the classroom and are considered prestigious positions.

You can help girls like Maria achieve their educational goals by donating to ChildFund’s Dream Bike project.


If You Can Read This, You Are Ahead of 757 Million Adults

8 yr old Urmila from India enjoying reading her fav story book.

Urmila, 8, of India, reads one of her favorite books. 

By Janella Nelson, ChildFund Education Technical Advisor

Imagine not being able to sign your own name or your child’s name. What if you couldn’t read a doctor’s instructions on your child’s medicine? This is the situation for millions of youth and adults around the world. According to the United Nations, approximately 757 million youth and adults are illiterate, with women and teenage girls making up two-thirds of this number. In the United States, 32 million adults can’t read, states a 2013 report from the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy.

Illiteracy is linked to poor outcomes in education, health, nutrition, sanitation, economics and even peace; areas with higher rates of illiteracy have higher rates of crime and conflict. Reading is a skill that carries you throughout life. In their early years, children learn to read, but quickly there is a transition, and then they must read to learn.

In their early years, children learn to read, but quickly there is a transition, and then they must read to learn.

Children growing up in poverty face several factors that prevent them from learning to read. Parental illiteracy, of course, is a major factor because they can’t teach their children a skill they don’t have, and illiterate adults often have a smaller vocabulary than their more educated counterparts do. In some countries, schools teach reading in a language foreign to the children, who may speak a local dialect or indigenous language at home. This, too, places children at a serious disadvantage.

ChildFund’s education programs put a special emphasis on learning to read in the grades one through three, because we recognize that learning to read early is essential to get children on the right track to continue their education. In several countries in Latin America, ChildFund has established “reading corners,” giving children dedicated time and books to read. In the Philippines, ChildFund has produced local storybooks, trained teachers in reading instruction, and hosted an eight-week summer camp for children who were struggling readers at school. In Afghanistan, ChildFund is developing radio stories to encourage parents to support their children’s reading habits at home, and also providing community reading clubs.

In September, we are celebrating literacy. This month, celebrate your ability to read this article while remembering the 757 million people who still need our support. Increasing literacy for children, youth and adults around the world benefits everyone.

Tomorrow, we’ll feature children who told us about their favorite books and stories, as well as how you can help encourage literacy worldwide.


Richmond 2015: Welcoming the World

Photographs by Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

This week marks the arrival of the UCI Road World Championships in Richmond, Virginia, home of ChildFund’s headquarters. It’s a time of excitement for the city and for our organization, which is the elite cycling event’s Charity of Choice. As you may be aware, we are promoting our Dream Bike campaign in connection with the races, and we’ve received support from the TWENTY16 women’s professional cycling team, which pledged to donate 10 Dream Bikes. This team includes Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong, who finished fifth yesterday in the elite women’s individual time trials. Because Dream Bikes help girls achieve their life goals, we went to see these athletes from around the world chase their dreams through Richmond’s streets. Congratulations to all, and enjoy the pictures!

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Mobile Banking Promotes Financial Security in Kenya

Mobile banking, or allowing funds to be sent electronically to a “mobile wallet,” may not spring immediately to mind as a major opportunity in developing countries. But in Kenya, a mobile banking project launched last November has helped families receive financial aid more quickly, efficiently and, most important, safely. In this video produced by our corporate partner Standard Chartered Bank, which created the Straight2Bank Wallet service, a Kenyan girl named Beatrice and her family talk about how they’ve used financial support through ChildFund to purchase her school books and uniforms, and ChildFund’s global treasurer, Sassan Parandeh, discusses its advantages in terms of security and broad social and economic change.

Lansana and His Dream Bike

Dream bike_3

Lansana (left, in yellow shirt) and his friends with their new bicycles. 

By Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Most of the children ChildFund works with in Guinea’s Dabola prefecture used to walk 2 1/2 miles or more to get to school. Many dreamed of bicycles to get them there quickly and safely.

One day, the dream came true, when 8-year-old Lansana and his friends received bicycles from ChildFund. “We will no longer be late for school!” they shouted with joy.

“Before, I used to walk to school with my little brother,” Lansana said. “We often got to school late, because I needed to go slowly with him along the road. Most of my friends whose parents bought bicycles for them could get to school sooner than we did. But today, I am so grateful to the donors of this bicycle. Though we are on school vacation, the bicycle will be a great help for my brother and me when school reopens. We will no longer get to school late.”

Lansana also talked about how much the bicycle was already helping his family: “Even now, the bicycle is a help to me and my family because I use it to get to the football field to play with my friends and also do little chores for my parents. Thanks again to the donors and to ChildFund.”

You can help make a difference in a child’s life by donating a Dream Bike

Meet Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme, 6, is from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and likes corresponding with his sponsor.

By Agueda Barreto, ChildFund Brasil

Six-year-old Guilherme was born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a neighborhood that has seen significant criminal activity. He’s a lively and curious child, full of energy, and his life has improved a great deal since his mother enrolled him in ChildFund’s programs.

Guilherme and his younger brother, 4-year-old Gabriel, participate in activities at ChildFund’s local partner GEDAM. He and his brother no longer have to stay at home as much or at someone else’s house while their mother works. They can be children! Today, Guilherme’s writing a letter to his ChildFund sponsor with his mother, Fabiana, helping him.

“I’m writing the second letter to my sponsor, and my mom is helping me, so the letter can be beautiful,” Guilherme says. “I love to write to him, and I’m happy when I get news as well. Here at the organization, what I like to do most is judo, play soccer, jump rope, read books, dance, paint and color.”

Guilherme writing a letter

He and his mother, Fabiana, write a letter to Guilherme’s sponsor. 
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