Restoring Health and Hope to ChildFund Communities

by Virginia Sowers
ChildFund Community Manager

As we mark World Health Day, cities and communities across the world are participating in this World Health Organization effort to improve individual and collective health globally.

Having just returned from a ChildFund Study Tour in Kenya, I was pleased to learn that Nairobi is one of 13,000 cities participating in this year’s World Health Day events, with an emphasis on urban health.

This week, Nairobi is closing a major street to traffic and setting up a health fair. Fun activities including music, dance, acrobats and a carnival procession will advocate and educate the public on healthy lifestyles in cities.

As we learned on a project visit to the Karai Pamoja HIV/AIDS support group in Kenya, education is absolutely critical to improved health. When this community was struck with the AIDS epidemic several years ago, the majority of the population feared the disease and lacked adequate knowledge about transmission and prevention. Those who became ill did not receive adequate care or nutrition. Children struggled to survive as their parents became bedridden or died.

In September 2005, ChildFund Kenya’s Weaving the Safety Net program “came to the rescue of the Karai community in the Kikuyu District,” explains Gad Son Thiru, chair of the community-based organization. ChildFund trained home-based care workers to support the bedridden and refer them to health facilities for antiretroviral therapy.

Next came the formation of the Karai Pamoja support group for people living with HIV/AIDS. It started with 15 members who tested positive and grew to 86 members. “Karai Pamoja support group became the only hope and savior of the people living with HIV/AIDS in this area because it was here members felt safe and secure,” Gad explains. Members felt safe to share personal worries, fears and hopes for the future.

Members of Karai Pamoja support group

As the members regained their health through good nutrition and access to medication, ChildFund helped them develop income-generating activities. The group has opened a community bank account, and the money is used to buy food, improve housing and support their children’s education.

ChildFund also helped sustain the community’s children by providing school uniforms, books, deworming, vitamin A supplements, mosquito nets and psychosocial support.

“As you can see,” Gad says, “you cannot tell our HIV status because we are now strong and back to our feet.”

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