Families Deal With Great Loss After Indian Cyclone

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

He had only heard about stories of big typhoons, but 11-year-old Loknath experienced a devastating storm for himself on Oct. 12, when Cyclone Phailin struck the shores of the eastern Indian state of Odisha.

Loknath, who is enrolled in ChildFund programs, was among a dozen children seeking shelter at a nearby school before the storm, which brought heavy rains and 124 mph winds, causing enormous damage to homes and farmland in Odisha and Andhra Pradesh.

cyclone damage

Loknath’s home was damaged by Cyclone Phailin in India’s Puri District.

“I was not very sure what was going to happen,” Loknath recalls. “Though there was no electricity, we had some kerosene lamps in the hall. We cooked our food inside the hall and started singing and talking to each other to pass time.

“Gradually, the wind began to blow with a moaning sound. And soon it became louder and louder. I felt as if the wind would blow the building away and we would all be thrown into the River Daya, which was just 50 meters away,” he added.

At the height of the storm, “we held each other’s hands and started praying to God for our safety till the winds weaken early in the morning,” Loknath said while staring at his broken house and a damaged rack where he used to keep his study materials and books. They were swept away in the storm.

“I don’t know how I will be able to buy all those materials,” Loknath said.

His mother, Rashmita, added that all of their belongings were either blown away or destroyed in the cyclone, and some lie scattered on the village’s roads now. However, she was thankful to the ChildFund staff for convincing them to leave the house before the cyclone arrived.

“Initially we thought that nothing would happen to our house,” she said. “But the project people came and forced us to leave the house as soon as possible. Thank God that we adhered to their advice. Otherwise, who knows what would have happened to us.”

Chabi, Loknath’s father, works hard to feed his six-member family, which includes his 65-year-old mother, whose foot was injured by a falling brick. He is now hoping for a house-repair aid fund from the Indian government, which was announced recently. 

In the villages served by ChildFund India’s local partner Nilachal Seva Pratisthan, four houses were severely damaged and others were partially damaged. The partner organization serves 724 ChildFund-enrolled children, including 484 sponsored children, in 14 villages.

boys at damaged home

Loknath (right) and his family of six have had to find new shelter after the cyclone.

Sudhansu Maharath, the partner organization’s project manager, said that he and his staff coordinated with the government to provide tarps to families whose houses were damaged, providing some protection from the elements, and helped them arrange for immediate shelter. “We are also exploring ways for some long-term measures to strengthen the communities’ livelihood means, which primarily include farming and pisciculture,” Maharath adds.

According to the latest estimate by the government and other agencies, more than 1.7 million people in 1,706 villages in Puri District were affected, and 105,000 houses have been damaged in the cyclone.

A joint team from ChildFund India and International Medical Corps have visited several villages in the district to conduct a needs assessment and are discussing long-term interventions in the region.

Families affected by natural disasters need immediate help, and ChildFund’s Emergency Action Fund allows us to act quickly when a disaster occurs in a country we serve. Please consider making a donation today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 788 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter