Giving Girls the Support They Need

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Today we celebrate the second International Day of the Girl Child, declared by the United Nations General Assembly to recognize girls’ rights. In 2012, the day focused on ending child marriage, and this year’s theme is related: Innovating for Girls’ Education.  

Years ago, when I began working in the developing world, I thought I knew the reasons behind girls’ early marriage and lack of education. But the longer I lived there, the more I discovered complexity and nuance. We still struggle to end child marriage and educate girls.

Imagine for a moment you’re a teenaged girl living in a developing country.

Your name means beautiful.

Guinean students

These girls are part of the student government in their primary school in Guinea.

At the beginning of each school year, your brothers move to the district capital to board with distant relatives. While they learn math, chemistry and physics, you pound rice in a mortar and pestle, cook meals over a three-stone fire, and tend the family’s garden, goats and chickens. Each week on market day you harvest avocados and mangoes to sell in the open-air market, bartering for whatever you can’t grow — rice, flour and oil.

You carry water home from the river in a basin on top of your head, moving slowly to avoid spilling the precious liquid. In sunny weather, you wash laundry by hand, laying clothes out on bushes to dry.

Each day, you gather branches from the forest, carrying them tied in a bundle on your head. At home you chop the wood into equal lengths to feed between the stones of your cooking fire.

In the evenings you prepare snacks to peddle in the streets: grilled peanuts, popcorn and ginger juice. Hearing the generator at the local bar shut off, you stack bowls of your mother’s specialties on your head and hurry to meet the village men as they celebrate the latest soccer match.  You offer fried plantains, sweet potatoes and cassava, crisp with fragrant peanut oil.

This month, you turned 15. Soon, you expect to marry a man at least twice your age. Within another year, you’ll carry your first baby on your back. You hope your husband will allow you to return to school or learn a trade.

Long ago, your older brothers passed their high-school leaving exams. The eldest studies engineering at university. The second graduated from teacher-training college, and the third works at a nearby government office — one of the few salaried occupations in your country.  

Your parents rejoice in their sons’ academic success; it brings your family a measure of economic security — an excellent return on investment. Your family will prosper.

You and your older sister completed primary school with certificates of merit, exceeding your community’s expectations. Your family speaks of you with pride. Your domestic skills attracted the attention of respectable families in the village, and your father now has several alliances to consider. Whomever he chooses as your husband will pay a substantial dowry.

Had you stayed in school, your marriage options would be fewer. An educated girl sparks no interest among village men. After a certain age, a girl cannot marry and enjoy the security of a husband. Your mother argued for you to leave school — like your sister before you — to prepare for marriage. Your father sadly agreed.

You are his favorite, the child he carried, running for miles to a hospital, as you convulsed with malaria. An old man now, he fears he can no longer protect you.

You will be beautiful on your wedding day.

Please help us celebrate International Day of the Girl Child with a Dream Bike for a schoolgirl in India or Sri Lanka, or a year’s scholarship for a girl in Ethiopia.

girl_child_graph

2 Responses to Giving Girls the Support They Need

  • Thank you for capturing the complexity of the situation, the culture that makes younger girls more prized and marriageable than older educated girls so that caring parents are forced to make these difficult decisions. For many parents who do succumb to the cultural expectations there are others who do not and are choosing to send their girl children to school. Let us emphasize and highlight those stories too. Just imagine how beautiful a girl can look in a graduation gown with a diploma in hand.

  • It is so touching that care is given to the girl child.I am a volunteer teacher in a NGO working for children and young women and also a rural unit for teaching sewing,computers and English.Is there any possibility for aid or sponsorships for these poor and under priviledged children?Would appreciate some help.thanks so much.
    The NGO is based in Kolkata India .

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