Uphill Climb to Provide Health Care to Rural Indian Families

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

One in a series this week for World Health Day (April 7) 

Saraswathi

Saraswathi and her baby at a parenting workshop in southern India.

On a hot afternoon in southern India, the atmosphere inside the small community center  was unbearably sultry. But for a group of women, the heat was not terribly bothersome, as they were in the middle of an informative and eye-opening session on child care and parenting skills. 

Led by Beula Ruth of the Kalaiselvi Karunalaya Social Welfare Society, one of ChildFund’s local partner organizations in the state of Tamil Nadu, the workshop was aimed at educating pregnant and lactating mothers about prenatal and postnatal care. 

“I had no idea about exclusive breastfeeding. I didn’t know that a child needs only breast milk for six long months,” says Saraswathi, a first-time mother of a 5-month-old baby. “This is something that I am hearing for the very first time.” 

Beula agrees and adds, “Every time, we come across some women who don’t have the basic knowledge on child care. This is why we continuously conduct such awareness sessions in our project area.” 

There has been substantial improvement to government health services in India, but a majority of people living in rural areas still don’t have access to health care.  And that’s where ChildFund comes into the picture, by working with the government and local partners to bring public health services to underserved communities.  

Here are some of the stark facts about the lives of rural Indians:

  • 66 percent of the rural population in India lacks access to preventive medicines
  • 31 percent of the rural population has to travel more than  18 miles for medical treatment
  • 10 percent of all babies die before their first birthday
  • 56 of every 1,000 Indian children will die before they turn 5
  • Only 35 percent of all Indians have access to improved sanitation facilities
  • Just 3.9 percent of India’s 2011 GDP was spent on public health

(Sources:  National Rural Health Mission, Government of India; WHO; Indiafacts.in) 

health camp in India

A doctor sees patients during a health camp organized by Pride India in the district of Raigad.

As part of our Early Childhood Development program, ChildFund and its partners in India conduct training sessions for mothers, discussing good nutrition (both for themselves during pregnancy and for their children under the age of 5), developmental benchmarks and preventive health care, among other issues.  

Last year, there were more than 9,000 training sessions across India, with more than 180,000 parents and other caregivers participating. As a result, more than 86 percent of births  occurred in hospitals or other health institutions, and more than 68,000 children have been fully immunized. 

“We make sure that all the communities have the access to government health facilities and if they don’t we bring those services to their doorsteps,” Beula says. “Our ECD workers and volunteers continuously monitor the health of children, pregnant women and new mothers and refer them to nearby hospitals whenever necessary.”   

Like Beula, Anita Ghalekar in Chochinde Kond — a remote village in Maharashtra State’s Raigad district — is a busy woman. Even after her retirement from ChildFund’s local partner Pride India, she is committed to maintaining access to health services for local families.     

health care in home

Anita Ghalekar monitors a boy’s growth in his home in the Raigad district.

Besides overseeing ChildFund’s home-based ECD intervention activities in her region, Anita leads 15 health camps, which provide workshops and care in individual villages. 

“We make sure that all the villages in and around our program area are covered under our programs designed to ensure basic health care of the people, especially children, new mothers and adolescent girls,” says Virendra Kulkarni, manager of Pride India. 

“And we implement these programs in such a way that the communities take ownership of them,” he adds. “For example, when we conduct health camps, villagers provide us accommodation, beds and other logistic support required. And this has helped us reach out to a wider population and implement our program successfully.”  

Dr. Vijay Kumar Singh, who led a health camp in Uttar Pradesh recently, says, “ChildFund is doing a great work. They are reaching out to people in those places where the government health service has not yet reached.”

One Response to Uphill Climb to Provide Health Care to Rural Indian Families

  • To think that I don’t have alot then to look at what these ppl hassles me feel like all I need is a loving , caring , and supportive family.That makes me prod of what I have and that I have that kind of family

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