Ebola, Guinea and ChildFund

Guinea Ebola prevention

A woman talks to her community in Guinea about preventing the spread of the Ebola virus.

Reporting by Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Ebola has sickened an estimated 4,200 people in Africa, and as of Sept. 9, 2,288 people have died from the virus, according to the World Health Organization. The spread of Ebola remains most serious in Liberia, where there have been the most deaths. Also affected are Guinea, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Senegal reported its first Ebola case last week, and officials in The Gambia are keeping close watch for cases, although none had been reported as of Sept. 9.

In Guinea, the situation appears to be stabilizing. As part of its strategy to fight the deadly Ebola virus, ChildFund Guinea identified and engaged community leaders to convey information to the public in three of Guinea’s affected communities.

Guinea healers and hunters

Traditional healers and hunters, who are helping the awareness-raising effort.

These 108 leaders include imams, priests, a pastor, traditional healers and hunters — all of whom are respected and have influence within their communities. In March, as the outbreak began, ChildFund Guinea’s office held training workshops on conducting outreach campaigns, as well as identifying and referring people with suspected cases of Ebola to health facilities.

As a result, community members have received important information about good hygiene and preventive measures from people they know and trust. The training has concluded, but information sharing continues through local groups and one-on-one discussions at Guineans’ homes and houses of worship.

To date, 35 traditional healers (10 in Kindia and 25 in Dabola) and 28 hunters involved in the project are actively continuing the efforts to contain the spread of Ebola in Guinea. These men are part of indigenous peoples, who trust them as caregivers of the land and of people. Because of their roles and influence, healers and hunters are critical to public awareness efforts.

This community-centered approach has created widespread trust and increased public support for the use of preventive measures.

The outreach campaign has yielded concrete results, as three people suspected of having the virus were referred to the Regional Hospital of Dabola. Unfortunately, these three patients died a few days later, but this intervention helped prevent further spread of the virus.

Since the end of March, no new cases have been reported in any of the communities where ChildFund works in Guinea. Nevertheless, community members continue to be vigilant and prepared to take action if they see anyone who has a suspected case of Ebola.

Read more about ChildFund’s efforts to prevent and contain Ebola in Guinea and other western African countries.

Guinea outreach on Ebola

Outreach efforts take many forms in Guinea.

2 Responses to Ebola, Guinea and ChildFund

  • Thank you so much for this update! I have a sponsor child in Guinea and have been waiting for details about the situation there. I have written to my sponsor child to see if him and his family are ok and he did respond that they were, but didn’t say anything else about Ebola.

    • You’re welcome — and we are glad that your sponsor child and his family are doing well. It is difficult to get photos and other information from the affected region, but we are trying to keep our supporters apprised of the situation.

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