In Jakarta’s Slums, Children Fold Up Their Dream Bikes

bikes in Jakarta

Children in Jakarta, Indonesia, receive their fold-up bicycles and helmets from ChildFund. Aisyah is in the green T-shirt.

Reporting and Photography by Sagita Adesywi, ChildFund Indonesia

Many children who benefit from ChildFund’s Dream Bikes program are in isolated communities and face long journeys across rough rural terrain. It’s a little different in south and east Jakarta, the huge capital city of Indonesia. Children there live in dense, crowded slums, and to get to school, they have to walk or take the public bus or a motorbike, a big daily expense for families living in poverty.

Because their homes also are small, 125 children in Jakarta’s slums received foldable bicycles from ChildFund’s local partner organization, Perkumpulan Marga Sejahtera, which hosts after-school activities.

“When they fold the bike, it won’t take up as much space,” explains the organization’s director, Liest Pranowo. “These children walk every day to school, and also when they join some activities out of school. Having a bike hopefully will help them to get to school easier, get in on time and be more active as well in out-of-school activities. It would save their parents some costs too. Usually, it takes about US$2 for a rental motorbike. It is just too much for them. As children are very active, we also provided them with helmets. If they fell, their heads would be protected.”

Aisyah, 12, with her bike.

Aisyah, 12, with her bike.

Let’s meet Aisyah, a 12-year-old girl who likes watching the news and hopes to be a doctor one day. She received a bike and helmet, and it’s making a difference already. These are her words:

I walked to school and back every day with my younger brother. He’s in the second grade. I leave home around 5 a.m. and get to school by 5:30 a.m. Often I came late to school, especially on Mondays and Fridays. On Mondays, we have a morning ceremony where we need to be ready a bit early, and on Friday we have group study and exercise that I need to come early for too. On those days, often I came late.

Once, there were other kids in the street from another school who made fun of me. They would say something bad, like “Oh, you are a hobo! Even your school is the school for hobos!” They were boys, four of them. I would tell them to please not to say something like that, as they wouldn’t want other people to say something bad in return, right?

Another time, when I came home from school, these boys said something bad to me again. One of them pulled my hair from the back and pushed me down. I fell down and cried. A taxi driver stopped them. When I got home, I told my mom, and she then went to their house, but they still didn’t want to say sorry.

I am not afraid of them, though, but I try holding myself hard to just ignore them. My brother always says to ignore them.

Since I am in the sixth grade now, there are days where I stay longer in school for extra classes. That’s fine, as I need to be prepared for the exams. I take extra classes in math, science and Indonesian language. But sometimes when I got home, I was too tired from walking under the hot sun to study again or do my homework.

When I finish school, I am going to be a doctor! I want to help people who are sick. But if they don’t have money, I will do it for free. It’s all right. Even though our government has health insurance, it is not enough to cover everything.

One day I saw in the news that a mother had just given birth. The hospital kept the baby longer as the baby was born premature, and the family couldn’t afford the cost for the treatment. That’s why I want to be a doctor, to help people in need like that.

I really am happy I was given the bicycle by ChildFund. I will ride the bike to school. The bicycle lets me get to school on time, and now I have more time to do my homework. I will even take my brother in the back saddle!

You can help girls like Aisyah by donating a Dream Bike. One bicycle costs $100, and its value is priceless. Stay tuned for more Dream Bike stories from Jakarta, coming soon.

One Response to In Jakarta’s Slums, Children Fold Up Their Dream Bikes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,083 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter