Not Exactly Child’s Play

Uganda children's game

In Kafue, Zambia, 15-year-old Grace jumps over a rope strung between two trees, in a game called waida. She and her friend are competing to see who can jump higher.

In August on the website, we’ll be featuring stories and videos about playing, which has been called the job of children. Play helps them learn social skills like sharing and cooperation, and gain abilities like hand-eye coordination, motor skills, language and spatial awareness. In other words, kids need to play, but poverty constructs barriers that are hard to surmount.

This week on Huffington Post, ChildFund President & CEO Anne Goddard writes about poverty’s effects on children’s freedom to play: “In many developing countries, the time for play is often displaced by the chores and responsibilities that are so familiar to children growing up in poverty.”

Learn more about what play means to children.

2 Responses to Not Exactly Child’s Play

  • I am glad to see the child playing but reminds me of the risks faced by children, even the play area is not safe, with rocks on the ground where the children can be hurt if they fall during play. We must encourage safety and protection for children in all spheres whether it is home, school or play area

  • Good article. Great work you are doing in fighting social ills in communities.

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