1 2 3 108

Learning a Better Way to Fight

Photo by Jéssica Takato, ChildFund Brazil

Brazilian girl

Thirteen-year-old Camilly of Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

When I visited ChildFund’s programs in Brazil earlier this year, girls and boys at a community center in Belo Horizonte were kicking and punching — while led by a teacher. They were learning basic moves in a martial arts class, and the teacher told me something interesting: Learning this ancient pugilistic art actually keeps kids from fighting.

And interest is growing. As more children learn Muay Thai and other martial arts, the center has begun offering a class at night for adults.

Camilly, 13, is one of several girls who take Muay Thai at the community center, and she is living proof that martial arts help people of all ages become more secure and confident, and less volatile. She’s practiced Muay Thai, also known as Thai boxing, since she was 10.

“I was very nervous and fought with everybody,” Camilly says, “but now that I do martial arts and play soccer, I’m getting better. In Muay Thai, we learn to have respect for others and not hit people outside of the fight. I changed a lot. I can settle things calmly, and I’m more patient.

“Now when something happens, I drink a glass of water, calm down, and everything is fine.”

Giving Haitians a Hand

haiti relief

In Jeremie, Haiti, service members from Joint Task Force Matthew and representatives from the United States Agency of International Development (USAID) deliver relief supplies to people affected by Hurricane Matthew. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Capt. Tyler Hopkins.

People in Haiti, many of whom were just recently recovering from the devastating earthquake of 2010, are now confronted with a second natural disaster: Hurricane Matthew. The Category 4 storm struck the island Oct. 4, killing more than 1,000 people and leaving hundreds of thousands homeless. Right now, the USAID and nongovernmental organizations are working to bring aid to more than a million people affected by the hurricane, but some communities have been cut off by floodwaters, mudslides and other debris blocking roads.

Meanwhile, concerns are mounting that there will be a cholera epidemic caused by the quick spread of highly contagious bacteria. As of Oct. 10, 13 people in Haiti had reportedly died from the illness. ChildFund is working with our Alliance partner in Canada to provide funds to the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) International, which is on the ground in Haiti, distributing hygiene kits, water purification tablets and food.

You can help children and their family members in Haiti by supporting this cooperative relief effort, and also stay up to date about what is happening on the island as we receive more information.

Sarah Makes Her Own Doll

Video by Jake Lyell

In Uganda, videographer Jake Lyell was busy filming families who are struggling to stay together while coping with acute poverty and need. We’ll share these videos with you soon — they’re a tribute to the strength and determination of parents, children and others in their communities, as well as demonstrating the positive effect of outside support. In the meantime, watch Jake’s short video of 11-year-old Sarah, who shows us how she made her own doll.

A Quiet Place in the Mercato


Children concentrate on their reading at a library in Addis Ababa’s Mercato, the largest market in the continent of Africa.

When I travel overseas, I make it a point to visit markets. They’re the best places to see what people eat, how they dress, whether they shop quickly or slowly browse. You may even pick up a couple of useful phrases in the native language, or strike a bargain for a piece of woven cloth or packet of spices. The smells, sights and sounds are often fascinating.

Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, is the home of Mercato, Africa’s largest market. It’s several miles long and employs 13,000 people.

As you can imagine, everything a person could possibly need is sold there, but Mercato was missing one key component for years: a lending library. In 2008, ChildFund Ethiopia, with a generous donation from a sponsor, built a library in the middle of the market. It’s still active, and the library has created changes for many children, who now have a place to study and read for fun.

On our website, we catch up with Rebka, a 13-year-old girl who frequents the Mercato library. Read more about this place, an oasis of quiet in the midst of the bustling market.

Welcome to Jinja, Uganda

Photos by Gertrude Apio

Along with videos, ChildFund staff members also chose a winning slideshow as part of our 2016 Community Video Contest. The photos come from Jinja Area Communities’ Federation (JIACOFE), which serves the Jinja, Kamuli and Mayuge districts of Uganda.

According to Meg Carter, who runs the video contest (and is our sponsorship education specialist), “Jinja is the source of the Nile River, and it’s a beautiful area located on the shores of Lake Victoria and the Nile. It’s famous for whitewater rafting and bird-watching. I’ve been there many times, as it’s on the road from Busia (where I lived) and the capital, Kampala. It’s about two hours’ drive from Kampala.”

Thank you to Gertrude Apio for taking these photographs and ChildFund Uganda’s Sharon Ishimwe for gathering information for the captions. Now, meet some of the children of Jinja!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A 360-Degree View of an Indian Village

It often takes a full day to fly from the United States to India, counting layover time, and that brings you just to the nearest large city. To reach Dhodlamitta, a village in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, you’ll spend several more hours on the road.

This summer, a team of filmmakers, plus ChildFund staff members from India and the U.S., traveled to Dhodlamitta for an unusual purpose: to create a 360-degree video that will give viewers the experience of visiting the village. Using the 360 GoPro camera and other elaborate gear, the crew takes us to homes, a school and fields where people labor under the sun every day.

Annapoorna is our narrator. She’s a former sponsored child who is now a teacher, a wife and a mother. When she was growing up, child marriage was very common where she lives —  and it still is in nearby villages. Sponsorship and ChildFund’s programs helped Annapoorna continue her education and finish university. She also is in a happy marriage that was her choice, and her daughter is thriving.

We hope you’ll take a look at the 5-minute video — and share it. Not everyone has the opportunity to fly across continents and oceans to Dhodlamitta, but we can offer you the next-best thing: an immersive virtual reality experience. You can also read more about Annapoorna and the making of the video.

A Glorious Moment of Silliness

This video — an honorable mention in ChildFund’s 2016 Community Video Contest — comes from the Lango sub-region in northern Uganda. Watch how three children have way too much fun knocking mangoes out of trees. Soon, we’ll feature the top three videos here, but you can see more honorable mention videos filmed by children and staff members at ChildFund’s local partner organizations, giving us a peek at life in communities where we work. Have fun! Have a mango!

Creating a Culture of Reading

Photo and reporting by Rashmi Kulkarni, ChildFund India

mobile library India

In India’s Karnataka state, children gather around a mobile library, which brings books and other learning materials to remote communities.

In parts of India, ChildFund and our partners have focused on building literacy rates and, more significantly, a deeper culture of reading. This is hard to do in communities where many households have no books and where adults never learned to read. Some homes don’t even have electrical power, limiting story time to daylight hours.

As you may have read in previous stories about the Books, my Friends project, ChildFund has distributed more than 40,000 book bags full of fun books, so children have exposure to more than just school textbooks and can start building a library at home. Some are written in their native dialects, and others are in English, which helps them learn to read a new language. We’ve also distributed solar-powered lamps to households without electricity, and now, we have begun sending mobile libraries out to rural and remote areas.

Today is International Literacy Day. Let’s take the advice of Anna Dewdney, the late author of the Llama Llama series of children’s books, and read to (or with) a child.

“When we read with a child, we are doing so much more than teaching him to read or instilling in her a love of language,” Dewdney wrote. “We are doing something that I believe is just as powerful, and it is something that we are losing as a culture: by reading with a child, we are teaching that child to be human. When we open a book, and share our voice and imagination with a child, that child learns to see the world through someone else’s eyes.”


Catching Up With Phenny

phenny screengrab


Do you remember Phenny? She’s a former sponsored child in Zambia who now is a supervisor at one of the country’s largest automotive repair shops. We caught up with her recently during a trip to Lusaka, and on our website is a new video of Phenny recalling her tough life as an orphan and how sponsorship helped her continue school and succeed in her career.

“As you can see, I’m the only lady here, supervising a number of men,” Phenny said in our 2014 interview. “My life has changed positively, and I feel like I’m living my dream. I have dreams of meeting my sponsor to thank him and tell him in person what his support has done.”

Happy Labor Day, everyone!

In the Words of ChildFund Alumni: Sponsors Matter

nursing student in Indonesia

Else is pursuing a nursing degree, a goal her sponsors enthusiastically support. 

If you’re thinking of becoming a sponsor, don’t take it from us. Take it from former sponsored children: You matter. We hear from many young adults who are involved in careers, higher education and leadership roles that they never expected to achieve before someone sponsored them as children. Your consistent support and encouragement help them pursue many kinds of dreams and even pass on your generosity to future generations. Here are just a few examples.

Paul, a teacher in Uganda: “My sponsor used to inspire me through the letters he sent. I used to wait so eagerly for his response whenever I wrote to him. He always reminded me to work hard at school.”

Makeshwar, a community leader in India“We will always remain indebted to ChildFund and our sponsors. We have taken a vow, and we will continue to serve underprivileged children and help them live with dignity.”

Lidiane, a business owner in Brazil“Today I am a warrior, a hardworking and brave woman, fighting for my goals and dreams, and you are part of this. I wish I could say more to you, but I can write a thousand words here and still would not demonstrate what you represent in my life story.”

Else, a nursing student in Indonesia: “I want to help cure people. My favorite subject is pediatric nursing. I love taking care of young children. Soon, I will be working in a hospital helping young children in need.”

1 2 3 108
Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,060 other subscribers

Follow me on Twitter