childfund

1 2 3 92

Establishing a Firm Foundation in Fatumeta

Timor-Leste early childhood development

Abrigu, 5, counts the letters of the alphabet with the help of his teacher, Fernanda.

By Silvia Ximenes, ChildFund Timor-Leste

Fernanda, who works in an Early Childhood Development (ECD) center in Fatumeta, Timor-Leste, often begins class by asking the children questions.

“What do people usually use to communicate with each other?”

Most of the children confidently say, “A telephone.”

“Is there anything other than a telephone?” Fernanda asks.

The class becomes quiet. Five-year-old Abrigu and his friends are searching for the answer. Fernanda gives the children a clue: “Something that we watch the news or a movie with — what do you call it?”

“A television!” the children say simultaneously.

Abrigu and his father

Abrigu and his father, Agusto.

After hearing their answers, Fernanda explains today’s topic to the children: different means of communication. She talks about telephones, televisions, newspapers and radio.

The Fatumeta ECD center started in 2008 with support from ChildFund. In her class of 27 children, Fernanda uses methods and techniques she learned in ChildFund’s training programs. By providing the children with various types of games and learning activities, she hopes to help them learn important skills while also expressing their creativity.

As part of today’s lesson, Abrigu carefully writes the letters of the alphabet on a large chalkboard. Afterward, Fernanda asks children to count the letters — combining learning about the alphabet with counting exercises, which will enhance the children’s overall comprehension.

ChildFund, along with local partner organization Moris Foun, supplies the center with books, paper and pencils, as well as education training for the staff members. ChildFund’s goal is to support children so they can complete their studies and become confident, educated adults who can help their communities improve.

Abrigu’s father, Agusto, came with him to the center today. A farmer and dad of seven, Agusto is aware of the importance of education for his children’s future. He says that one of Abrigu’s sisters has also gone through the ECD program. She is now in the second grade  and is doing well, Agusto proudly reports. “She is confident in her learning and is progressing well because she had the opportunity to develop her knowledge in the very beginning through the ECD center.”

Mamta’s Path to Becoming a Teacher

In this video, Mamta talks about how the Udaan scholarship available through ChildFund India has helped her overcome financial challenges to attend university to become a teacher. Her parents are illiterate, and many of her friends in her village dropped out to get married, so what she is doing is remarkable.

“I want to teach other girls to continue their educations so they’ll be independent, like me, and have a good life,” Mamta says. Video by Jake Lyell.

 

In Guinea, Schools Reopen as Ebola Subsides

By Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

After schools were closed for six months during the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, classes began again in Guinea on Jan. 19. Attendance was low the first day, but students seemed happy to see each other after the long quarantine.

After going through the process of hand washing at washing stations distributed by ChildFund and having their temperatures taken with non-contact thermometers, children greeted one another happily and expressed how much they had missed each other and their schools.

“This is my first day in school,” said Djenabou, age 14. “Ebola has done us wrong by keeping us out of school for six months. I was so scared when I used to come out to buy food. I thought everyone was going to die. But thank God that I am still alive and back to school again. I am very happy to meet my friends.”

While walking her 5-year-old daughter to school, Mrs. Diallo said, “Some parents are not ready to let their children come to school. Yesterday I was in the market, where I told some parents that schools have reopened. One of the ladies said that she was not yet ready to let her three children return to school unless people stop using non-contact thermometers at school. She mistakenly thinks this is a means of transmitting the virus to children.”

When you go around the areas where ChildFund works, you will notice practical measures have been put in place at schools and universities to protect teachers and students against Ebola and prevent its return. We have helped set up hand-washing stations and provided non-contact thermometers to 1,175 schools, reaching more than 500,000 students as of mid-February.

ChildFund Guinea is deeply engaged in the fight against Ebola and continues to provide training to local authorities, religious leaders, traditional healers and traditional birth attendants, all of whom are raising awareness about Ebola prevention measures in communities.

Below, take a look at a slideshow of images from Guinea’s schools.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s the Year of the Sheep!

Sheep

Lipasi holds one of her family’s sheep in Samburu County, Central Kenya. Photo by Jake Lyell.
sheep in Ethiopia

Hirut, 8, poses with a sheep at Mush Primary School in Ethiopia. Photo by Jake Lyell.

 

ChildFund’s roots are in China, where we were founded in 1938 to help Chinese orphans after the Japanese invasion of their country. Today, Feb. 19, is the Chinese New Year, and 2015 is the Year of the Sheep.

We figured it was a nice time to remind ChildFund supporters that you can help make a difference in a child’s life by donating a sheep (or two). Families who receive a sheep gain a source of milk and the possibility of increasing their income by selling wool and lambs. Thanks for considering the gift of a sheep, and gong xi fa cai!

 

Ebola Breakout Reveals Africa’s Nurse Shortage

Zambia e-learning studentsThe first class of e-learning students at Mufulira School of Nursing in Zambia.

Health care workers, international aid foundations and many other people worldwide have learned a great number of lessons from the Ebola breakout in West Africa. For one thing, the epidemic has exposed the severe lack of trained health care professionals in the region. In Zambia, on the other side of the continent, there is only one health care worker for every 1,500 people. Last summer, ChildFund and The MasterCard Foundation launched the Zambia Nurse and Life Skills Training Program, an e-learning opportunity for approximately 6,000 young Zambian adults to become nurses and midwives within the next five years. Today, in a Huffington Post article, ChildFund President & CEO Anne Lynam Goddard elaborates on the program and how it could be expanded to create a global impact.

Fatoumata’s Fight Against Ebola

By Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Fatoumata

Fatoumata, 25, is training with ChildFund Guinea, where she is part of anti-Ebola effort.

Fatoumata, 25, is in job training with ChildFund Guinea after completing her degree at university. Currently, she is involved in branding hand-washing kits with ChildFund’s logo before distributing them to schools. The kits, which consist of a rubber bucket, a chlorine solution and hands-free thermometers, are very important now that schools are reopening since the Ebola outbreak in Guinea has been contained. Fatoumata recently expressed what it means to her to be part of the fighting force against the Ebola virus.

“If Ebola was something visible that one could attack face to face, I could fight it with all my might until the last bit of the virus gets out of the country. I am happy to contribute to efforts in fighting against the disease.

“Many children are stigmatized today because of this deadly virus. Last month, when I had the opportunity to go into the field with the ChildFund Guinea team, I saw orphan children often rejected by their friends, only because either both or one of their parents died from Ebola. This condition calls for an approach that will facilitate their social inclusion.

“Also, children have stopped enjoying their educational rights during the past six months because schools were closed due to Ebola. They need to go to school and learn to prepare for their future. They need to have peace of mind at home and when they are playing with their friends. So, every possible measure needs to be taken to wipe away the virus.”

 

 

Zambia Video Wins ChildFund Contest

This video featuring Tinashe, a 10-year-old girl from Zambia, won first prize in ChildFund’s 2014 Community Video Contest for its heartfelt depiction of how crucial water is to life in Zambia’s rural Luangwa District. There, water is infested with crocodiles, making it dangerous to fetch water for cooking, drinking and bathing. Tinashe is part of the Mandombe community within the Luangwa Child Development Agency, which ChildFund has partnered with for a number of years.

Thanks and congratulations to Tinashe, ChildFund Zambia, the Mandombe community and the Luangwa Child Development Agency!

In Ecuador, a Family Sees a Bright Future

Paul and Robinson with their grandparents, Victor and Martha, at their home in northern Ecuador.

Paul and Robinson with their grandparents, Victor and Martha, at their home in northern Ecuador.

By Veronica Travez, ChildFund Ecuador

Paul and Robinson are two smart and happy brothers, 13 and 11 years old respectively. They’ve gone through hardships in their lives but still have a great deal of hope and enthusiasm for the future.

Because their mother died from health problems when they were very young, the boys live with their grandparents, Martha and Victor, in a community about 15 minutes from San Gabriel, Ecuador. In this largely agricultural area, most locals work as laborers on potato, bean or corn plantations and earn an average salary of $10 a day. Martha, 73, divides her days between farm work and caring for the boys and her husband. The family raises guinea pigs and chickens for additional income.

Paul and Robinson are enrolled in ChildFund’s Aflatoun and Aflateen community clubs, which offer children and youth educational workshops about saving money, spending responsibly and their rights. Martha attends family workshops that have helped her understand the importance of school and extracurricular activities like sports and cultural events.

Three years ago, the boys received sponsors, whose support has been very important to the family. On one occasion, Paul’s sponsor sent him $100, which he used to buy a bed, a mattress and a cabinet for storing his clothes.

“I feel very grateful that they support my little ones without having met them,” Martha says. “I always ask God to give the sponsors his holy blessings and to always take care of them, wherever they may be.”

Robinson_playing soccer

Robinson, playing soccer with friends. 

 

Victor and Martha at their home

Victor and Martha, the boys’ grandparents.

 

Paul riding his horse_lightened

Paul, riding his horse.

 

Honduras to Washington: A Sponsorship Story

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Bob and Margaret Erickson

Bob and Margaret Erickson, ChildFund sponsors.

In a small Honduran village in the mountains, 12-year-old Yunior writes letters regularly to Margaret and Bob Erickson, who live in Washington state, a continent away. They’ve sponsored him through ChildFund since 2005, when Yunior was only 3 years old. A lot has changed in that time, particularly his communication skills.

“He’s taking English classes now. He’s writing to us in English,” Margaret says with excitement. “We have no children, and we are going to try to set up something so he can go further in school. He’s a very important part of our lives.”

Ten years ago, the Ericksons decided to sponsor a younger child so they could follow him through his childhood, helping where they could. He’s the first child they’ve sponsored. Yunior’s mother had died, and his father’s family took him in, although his grandfather and uncle were only earning about $42 a month. Because Yunior was too young to write, his aunts and grandmother wrote letters to the Ericksons on his behalf.

photo of Yunior

Yunior’s smiling picture from Christmas 2014.

“I didn’t know what to call ourselves, but his aunt called us godparents,” Margaret recalls. In the passing years, Yunior has had happy and sad experiences; his grandmother passed away, but he also has succeeded in school. He’s now in seventh grade, and his favorite classes are math and English, Margaret says. She and her husband have sent money for Christmas, which Yunior often uses for practical purposes like clothes and shoes, and they also paid for a floor for the family’s house and a bed for Yunior, who had been sleeping on the ground.

“I’ve totally encouraged him to stay in school and do well,” Margaret says. “I’ve told him if he needs anything for school that he can’t afford, to let me know.”

Bob Erickson is a retired civil engineer, and Margaret was an internationally certified ophthalmology technician, setting up doctors’ practices remotely and often dealing with new eye diseases that immigrants carried to western Washington as they begin new lives in the United States. The couple has long had an interest in international travel and has visited the Panama Canal, the Falkland Islands and glaciers in a South American inlet.

Aside from receiving letters from Yunior, the Ericksons sometimes get photos from him. For years, he has posed for pictures with a grim look on his face, so Margaret asked him to smile in a picture this year.

“This Christmas, he gave us an awesome, big smile,” she reports. “He is a delight, and we truly love him.”

1 2 3 92

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 908 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter