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Seven Billion Liters of Clean Water

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Seven billion liters of water: That’s a big number, one that’s hard to imagine. But it has made the difference to at least 39,000 people who might have lost their lives to waterborne diseases over the past 10 years.

7 billion liters

Claudia’s family received CSDW’s 7 billionth liter of clean water. Photo courtesy of P&G.

In 2004, one of ChildFund’s partners, Procter & Gamble, started the nonprofit Children’s Safe Drinking Water program, which provides packets of water-purifying powder to families in the Americas, Asia and Africa who don’t have reliable access to clean water. Recently, CSDW passed the milestone of delivering its 7 billionth liter of clean water, to a family in one of ChildFund’s programs in Brazil. ChildFund has helped distribute the packets. Seven billion liters equal one liter of clean water for every single person in the world, and CSDW estimates that the program has prevented 300 million days of diarrheal disease and saved 39,000 lives.

The program is part of P&G’s Clinton Global Initiative pledge to help save one life an hour by 2020.To celebrate the milestone, P&G has launched a social media drive now through April 22 (Earth Day). Every time you use the hashtag #7billionliters on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram during this week, P&G will donate an additional liter of clean drinking water. They hope to provide 1 million more liters this week!

“This new program is one example of why ChildFund values its partnership with P&G,” says Anne Lynam Goddard, ChildFund’s president and CEO. “Clean water means a disruption of poverty. Thanks to our partnership with P&G, not only are we changing lives in Brazil, but in many countries around the world, from drought-affected areas of Kenya to areas impacted by natural disasters in Indonesia and Mozambique.”

 

The ‘Mama Effect’ on the World

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Have you heard the saying “When Mama ain’t happy, nobody’s happy”? The words are glib, but the sentiment behind them is right on target. A mother’s health and well-being have a huge impact on the future of her children and her community, both positively and negatively.

Consider a few statistics:

  • Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of an infant’s life, with continued breastfeeding up to the age of 2, would save about 800,000 children’s lives each year, according to the World Health Organization.
  • The children of more educated women also have a greater chance of surviving infancy and childhood. A 2010 study in The Lancet shows that for every additional year of school that girls receive on average after reaching childbearing age, there’s a corresponding 9.5 percent decrease in child mortality rates.
  • If women had the same access to seeds and farming tools as men do, agricultural output in 34 developing countries would rise by an average of 4 percent, which could mean up to 150 million fewer hungry people, according to U.N. Women.

This month, as we approach Mother’s Day, ChildFund is considering the “Mama Effect” — how mothers’ lives influence their children’s lives, both now and in the future. We are working in 30 countries worldwide to provide children and mothers with the tools they need to live healthy, independent and empowered lives. Find out how you can give a mother a helping hand. Your gesture can make a difference to a whole family, a community and even the world.

India mother and son

An Indian mother comforts her son.

Give a Gift That Grows

chicken with eggs

Ten-year-old Bisafikade of Ethiopia and his chicken. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Hooray, it’s spring! (For many of us on the East Coast and in the Midwest, it’s been a long time coming.) Let’s celebrate by giving gifts that grow, like chickens, goats and fruit trees.

Families in countries where ChildFund works have requested these as specific needs, among others. Livestock and plant seeds are gifts in more than one way, because they produce food that families can eat and sell. A pair of dairy goats provides milk, cheese and yogurt; fruit trees produce nutritious fruit and seeds that can grow into more trees. And chickens lay eggs, which frees up family income for other needs like education and health care.

These gifts often make a difference in a child’s ability to attend school or have proper clothing and shoes, because families can make income from selling surplus fruit, dairy products or eggs. Please consider giving a gift from our online catalog or by calling us at 1-800-610-9013. Thanks, and let’s enjoy the season.

 

Hope in the Form of a Goat

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

Read Nicole’s first post about her trip to Dominica, a Caribbean island nation where ChildFund works.

I often say that ChildFund’s work begins where the pavement ends, and this rang true in Dominica. Within a few blocks of a docked cruise ship, about 10 miles outside of the capital of Roseau, we parked the car and walked up a path of crumbling stones and packed earth.

Miranda and Lashana

Miranda and her 4-year-old daughter Lashana.

It was there that I met Miranda, 31, and her 4-year-old daughter, Lashana. Miranda and her five children, who are enrolled in ChildFund’s programs, live in a small two-bedroom home she inherited from her grandmother. The home is made of weathered wood panels atop cement blocks. There are gaps where the ceiling and walls don’t meet, and broken windows outnumber whole ones.

They have lived without electricity for more than five years, and their bathroom is in the backyard, with a pit latrine and a hose for a shower, plus a few panels of plywood and rusted metal sheets for privacy. Her three sons, aged 17, 14 and 12, share one tiny bedroom; her two daughters, aged 9 and 4, sleep in a twin bed in the hall outside of the bedroom that Miranda shares with Lashana’s father.

Miranda does her best for the family. She encourages her children to go to school so they will have more opportunities than she had. The school down the road is supported by ChildFund and embraces the child-friendly methodology (including alternative discipline, age-appropriate furniture, bright and engaging learning environments and parental engagement). We had visited the school earlier in the day to distribute sleeping cots for preschoolers and to see a renovated library where children can read, study and imagine.

Lashana suffers from asthma and other respiratory problems, which often forces her to return home early from preschool; she often falls ill if any of her classmates are sick. Miranda believes in the power of early stimulation and education, something ChildFund encourages throughout Dominica and in other countries, so she has educational charts at home to promote Lashana’s learning of the alphabet, numbers, vegetables and fruits.

Lashana and goat

Lashana and her goat.

Miranda doesn’t have a formal education, so her employment options are limited.

She takes on odd jobs, anything to provide for her family — cleaning homes, washing laundry by hand and so on. Miranda also keeps a small garden in the backyard to feed her family and sell the surplus produce in the market. But heavy rains this year ruined her crops and waterlogged the seeds. As a result, the family is having a hard time making ends meet.   This is why Lashana was all smiles as she told me her most exciting news: She recently received a goat from her ChildFund sponsor. Though Lashana knows it is her goat, she also realizes that this goat will help the entire family with milk to sell, and once they breed the goat, they will be able to supplement their income by selling the offspring.

The day-to-day life for this family is daunting, but they have hope. Sponsors help provide hope for many children through their support of ChildFund’s programs and the families themselves. Sometimes in the form of a goat.

Natural Beauty, Harsh Poverty in Dominica

Dominica scenery

The Caribbean island of Dominica.

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager 

The descent onto the mountainous island is one of beauty and circus spectacular. Our small propeller plane surfed the air currents tipping left, right, up, left, left, up, right, like a toddler taking his first clumsy steps while teetering on the brink of a near-certain fall. As the plane touched down, at the end of the runway was the ocean, waves relentlessly crashing into the rocky shoreline. 

Leaving the airport, I was immediately reminded of why Dominica is nicknamed the Nature Island. We passed over so many beautiful rivers and brooks that feed the rainforest canopy, which engulfed the taxi as we wound our way to my hotel, my home away from home for the week ahead. This country is nothing short of breathtaking. It is the perfect destination for hikers, divers and cruise enthusiasts. 

cruise ship

A cruise ship docks near the capital of Roseau.

In February, I spent a week in Roseau, Dominica, where ChildFund’s Caribbean national office is located. Dominica is about 1,400 miles southeast of Florida — past Cuba, past the Dominican Republic, past Puerto Rico.

Its beauty at first hides the harsh realities of poverty affecting the most vulnerable of the island’s inhabitants, particularly children. Seaside mansions built into the cliffs are brightly colored with Caribbean hues, as they obscure the shantytowns behind them, shacks constructed with plywood and rusted metal sheets. 

Here, children sleep many to a bed. Their fathers often have left the home, and their mothers barely eke out a living. Incidents of child neglect and abuse are high, while income levels are low. The cost of living is high, too. Despite the common view that the Caribbean is better off than other parts of the developing world, the harsh living conditions of children and youth in Dominica are on par with what I have seen in some of the most remote and impoverished parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

This is why ChildFund works here. This is why we do what we do. 

Tomorrow, Nicole reports on a family from Dominica.  

To ChildFund Volunteers: Thank You!

By Jennifer Hughes, Volunteer Program Senior Specialist

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.” — Aesop, “The Lion and the Mouse”

Thompson Square volunteers

ChildFund volunteers at a Thompson Square concert in California.

We’re in the midst of National Volunteer Week (April 6-12), a time to honor people who graciously give of their time, skills and energy. We at ChildFund feel lucky to have volunteers who appreciate the joy that comes from contributing their time to children in need.

Volunteering with ChildFund is not a new concept, but today we have more opportunities than ever before to volunteer. One way is through our LIVE! Artists series, which offers people the chance to talk to concert attendees about sponsoring children, often drawing on their own experiences. The 2013 Donny & Marie Osmond Christmas Tour drew in more than 1,000 volunteers across the United States, who shared stories about sponsorship and even found sponsors for children in countries where ChildFund serves.

“It meant a lot to me to be able to volunteer for ChildFund at an event! I actually helped to get children sponsored,” said Tiffany of Greensboro, N.C.  

Another avenue for volunteering is to “Paint Your Town ChildFund Green.” Have you tried it? It doesn’t take any real painting: just the willingness to put up posters in your town, creating awareness of how ChildFund helps children. Volunteers have posted more than 300 signs all over the U.S. If you’d like to participate, email me.

If you walk into our International Office in Richmond, Va., you might run into one of our volunteers. You will easily recognize them, because they are always smiling and lending a helpful hand. Having volunteers working in the office (who write thank-you notes and call new donors, among other duties) has been fun; they get to see the entire organization from the ground up, and we get to know them as well.

“As a volunteer with ChildFund International, I am intrinsically rewarded beyond my expectations,” said Patricia, a retired educator and volunteer in our International Office. “I feel fulfilled when I leave, having contributed in a unique way to the children that ChildFund serves. It has enhanced the rewarding feeling that I have as a sponsor. Providing for children is a global challenge, and I am amazed at all of the initiatives of ChildFund and pleased to be a part of this major altruistic endeavor.”

If you would like information about volunteering with ChildFund, please contact me at Jhughes@childfund.org, or if you are in the Richmond area, please give us a call at (804) 756-2772.

The Enormous Toll of Vector-Borne Diseases

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist 

One in a series this week for World Health Day (April 7)  

One bright morning, I was administering the English language section of a four-hour exam in a high school in Saint-Louis, Senegal. About halfway through the test, which divides high school graduates who go on to university from those who return to their villages to farm, I felt dizzy and feverish. 

malaria in Senegal

A malaria clinic in Senegal.

By noon, I was walking slowly across a quarter-mile-long cantilever bridge, clinging to the handrail. The bridge connects the island portion of the town to the mainland, where I lived. It felt as if a vise was crushing my head; I could barely see. 

Reaching the mainland, I sat down on a pile of rocks on the bank of the Senegal River, shaking uncontrollably in the intense sunlight. Eventually, a cool hand grazed my forehead. I heard a sharp intake of breath, then a familiar voice saying, in French, “malaria.” 

I stared at the child in front of me, unable to move or speak. 

“Miss Meg, it’s me, Amadou N’Diaye. I’m taking you home now.” 

He ran back to the street and flagged down a taxi. Together, Amadou and the driver lifted me inside. When we arrived at our apartment block, Amadou ran first to my Peace Corps colleagues, who carried me up the stairs and into bed. Then he found my French friend. “Bring your medicines, quick,” he told Christian. 

Christian’s cocktails of anti-malarial and tetracycline drugs worked. Three days later, I came out from under my mosquito net, no longer wanting to die. 

I’d slept under that net for nearly two years. And I’d taken tonic water daily for its quinine benefit, lit a mosquito coil in my bedroom each evening at sunset, and swallowed my weekly pills. But despite these precautions, on restless nights when I bumped up against my net, mosquitos feasted on my arms and legs. Anti-malarial drugs don’t entirely destroy plasmodium parasites, which carry malaria; they merely keep them under control. In those days, the West African breeds were increasingly drug-resistant. 

Now imagine what it’s like for children without bed nets or medication who are bitten every night of every rainy season by hundreds of mosquitos. 

mosquito bed net

A Gambian girl’s bed net helps protect her from malaria.

This year, World Health Day is turning its focus toward vector-borne infections; its motto is “small bite, big threat.” Epidemiologists refer to insects and snails as the vectors for parasites and viruses they transmit to our bloodstreams. 

Malaria is the world’s most prevalent vector-borne infection, but dengue fever, a mosquito-borne virus, is the fastest growing. In the countries where ChildFund serves, other parasitic diseases such as Chagas, from kissing bugs, and trypanosomiasis, from tsetse flies, threaten children’s health. Viral illnesses, including chikungunya (mosquitos), schistosomiasis (freshwater snails), and the hemorrhagic fevers — Yellow Fever (mosquitos), Rift Valley Fever (mosquitos) and Crimean-Congo Fever (ticks) — are less widespread but still deadly.

Urbanization, deforestation and damaging agricultural practices all contribute to the spread of malaria. Deforestation and urbanization also led to resurgences of Yellow Fever and the sudden emergence of dengue and chikungunya. 

Mosquitos breed in stagnant water, hiding in tall grass during the day and tracking their human targets nightly by the carbon dioxide we exhale. Although we can’t yet eradicate malaria, giving families access to medicated bed nets is a step in the right direction.

Uphill Climb to Provide Health Care to Rural Indian Families

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

One in a series this week for World Health Day (April 7) 

Saraswathi

Saraswathi and her baby at a parenting workshop in southern India.

On a hot afternoon in southern India, the atmosphere inside the small community center  was unbearably sultry. But for a group of women, the heat was not terribly bothersome, as they were in the middle of an informative and eye-opening session on child care and parenting skills. 

Led by Beula Ruth of the Kalaiselvi Karunalaya Social Welfare Society, one of ChildFund’s local partner organizations in the state of Tamil Nadu, the workshop was aimed at educating pregnant and lactating mothers about prenatal and postnatal care. 

“I had no idea about exclusive breastfeeding. I didn’t know that a child needs only breast milk for six long months,” says Saraswathi, a first-time mother of a 5-month-old baby. “This is something that I am hearing for the very first time.” 

Beula agrees and adds, “Every time, we come across some women who don’t have the basic knowledge on child care. This is why we continuously conduct such awareness sessions in our project area.” 

There has been substantial improvement to government health services in India, but a majority of people living in rural areas still don’t have access to health care.  And that’s where ChildFund comes into the picture, by working with the government and local partners to bring public health services to underserved communities.  

Here are some of the stark facts about the lives of rural Indians:

  • 66 percent of the rural population in India lacks access to preventive medicines
  • 31 percent of the rural population has to travel more than  18 miles for medical treatment
  • 10 percent of all babies die before their first birthday
  • 56 of every 1,000 Indian children will die before they turn 5
  • Only 35 percent of all Indians have access to improved sanitation facilities
  • Just 3.9 percent of India’s 2011 GDP was spent on public health

(Sources:  National Rural Health Mission, Government of India; WHO; Indiafacts.in) 

health camp in India

A doctor sees patients during a health camp organized by Pride India in the district of Raigad.

As part of our Early Childhood Development program, ChildFund and its partners in India conduct training sessions for mothers, discussing good nutrition (both for themselves during pregnancy and for their children under the age of 5), developmental benchmarks and preventive health care, among other issues.  

Last year, there were more than 9,000 training sessions across India, with more than 180,000 parents and other caregivers participating. As a result, more than 86 percent of births  occurred in hospitals or other health institutions, and more than 68,000 children have been fully immunized. 

“We make sure that all the communities have the access to government health facilities and if they don’t we bring those services to their doorsteps,” Beula says. “Our ECD workers and volunteers continuously monitor the health of children, pregnant women and new mothers and refer them to nearby hospitals whenever necessary.”   

Like Beula, Anita Ghalekar in Chochinde Kond — a remote village in Maharashtra State’s Raigad district — is a busy woman. Even after her retirement from ChildFund’s local partner Pride India, she is committed to maintaining access to health services for local families.     

health care in home

Anita Ghalekar monitors a boy’s growth in his home in the Raigad district.

Besides overseeing ChildFund’s home-based ECD intervention activities in her region, Anita leads 15 health camps, which provide workshops and care in individual villages. 

“We make sure that all the villages in and around our program area are covered under our programs designed to ensure basic health care of the people, especially children, new mothers and adolescent girls,” says Virendra Kulkarni, manager of Pride India. 

“And we implement these programs in such a way that the communities take ownership of them,” he adds. “For example, when we conduct health camps, villagers provide us accommodation, beds and other logistic support required. And this has helped us reach out to a wider population and implement our program successfully.”  

Dr. Vijay Kumar Singh, who led a health camp in Uttar Pradesh recently, says, “ChildFund is doing a great work. They are reaching out to people in those places where the government health service has not yet reached.”

ChildFund Assists Health Care Efforts in Mozambique

By ChildFund Mozambique Staff

One in a series this week for World Health Day (April 7)

Olga Jeje

Dr. Olga Jeje of Gondola, Mozambique.

Olga Jeje has worked in Gondola as a doctor since 2009, and she’s experienced firsthand the partnership between ChildFund and Mozambique’s health department, a collaboration that helps provide basic health services for children and families.

“At the health services department, we work in close coordination with ChildFund, which supports vaccination campaigns against polio and measles, and also in reaching children with supplements of vitamin A,” Olga notes.

ChildFund has supported doctors and other medical personnel with transportation and by facilitating their moves from one clinic to another. As a result, about 8,000 children have benefited in Gondola.

Another result of the partnership between ChildFund and the District Office of Health Gondola has been the distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito nets purchased by ChildFund supporters, benefiting more than 100 children who now have a better chance of avoiding malaria.

Talking to community members, many say that ChildFund’s contribution to local health services has meant a lot.  

“The presence of community health activists in the area, trained by ChildFund through the Community Caring for Children Programme, has been a great opportunity for us, because we now understand the benefits of taking our children to the health centers at the first signs of sickness,” says Julio Domingos, a community leader in Mazicuera. “We now know the importance of managing waste to avoid diseases, such as diarrhea, and we now know how important is to use a mosquito net in order to prevent malaria. We are now aware of the methods of how to prevent HIV and AIDS. We also see community activists paying visits to people living with HIV and AIDS, and we know that this gesture is very important for all of us.”

vaccination campaign

A vaccination campaign in a Gondola clinic.

Looking Back, Looking Forward

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

We’ve reached the final post of our 75th anniversary blog series: number 75. When this series started back in September 2013, I wasn’t sure this day would ever come, but it is here.

I’d like to take a moment to thank the ChildFund staff members who sat down for interviews, wrote stories, took photos, searched for archived photos and video, edited posts and made story suggestions. Your help was invaluable. Also, to all of the ChildFund Alliance leaders who contributed posts about their organizations’ work — thank you. It’s amazing that some of the countries where we worked decades ago are now strong and prosperous enough to help other children in need today.

During the series, we learned a great deal about the origins of ChildFund, which was called China’s Children Fund when it was founded in 1938 by Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke to help Chinese orphans. Over the years, our leaders and staff members — both in Richmond, Va. and abroad — have transformed our organization (renamed Christian Children’s Fund in 1951 and ChildFund in 2009) from a small but ambitious charity to a global aid organization that assisted more than 18 million people worldwide last year. 

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Some of the most memorable posts for me were about children and alumni who have seen great change take hold in their lives.

Gleyson, a young man from Brazil, wrote about his neighborhood, which was plagued with violence stemming from the drug trade. It also didn’t have running water. But he was sponsored and enrolled in a ChildFund-supported project that provided him with tutoring, study materials, extracurricular dance and art classes, and above all, a supportive environment.

Today, he writes, “I graduated with a degree in business administration, and I am a professional, registered with the Regional and Federal Brazilian Administration Councils and specializing in financial management and controllership. I recently purchased a car, and I’m currently employed in a company in charge of the administrative management of condos.”

We heard many encouraging stories like Gleyson’s. Manisha’s family was able to quit the bangle-making trade in Firozabad, India, finding more lucrative and less hazardous work; Nicky, a Zambian man, earned a degree in business administration and went to work for a bank. Many of the Chinese orphans who grew up in Hong Kong orphanages started by CCF have found professional and personal success, and an amazing number have formed their own charities to help other children. My colleague, Christine Ennulat, wrote an essay about how we can’t count the number of people that have been helped through ChildFund — because our actions have a ripple effect.

ChildFund will continue our work as we enter our 76th year, focusing on children and their families and giving support to communities in need — while providing training and resources through our local partner organizations, a process that lets communities determine their destinies. On the world stage, we are pushing for greater recognition of children’s needs as the United Nations sets its post-2015 development goals.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll leave you with a message from our CEO and president, Anne Lynam Goddard:

“Because nothing lasts forever, I never take for granted that ChildFund will continue for another 75 years. The decisions we make today will impact the ChildFund of tomorrow. We must continue to evolve as an organization, meeting the needs of children in a rapidly changing and complex world.

“Maybe one thing does last forever — the warm-hearted generosity of people who help children living in poverty. That part of our shared humanity is truly enduring.”

Indonesia 75th celebration

THANK YOU!

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