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How Food Brings Comfort

Uganda nutrition workshop

Food is an important part of community. Here, mothers prepare dishes at a nutrition workshop in Uganda. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Home from an afternoon at the beach, my brothers, sisters, cousins and I would sit crowded on the front porch, still in our swimsuits with our feet crusted in sand, eating ice cream made with heavy cream, sugar, eggs, vanilla and fresh peaches. My first summer living in Senegal, I found a cast-off barrel freezer, bought mangoes from the market and a block of ice and sea salt from the local fishery, then invited my friends to an ice cream party, which brought back those memories from the beach.

Food is far more than just nutrition; it’s also a universal symbol of hospitality. Sharing a meal creates community. Food comforts us when its scent or flavor triggers emotion and memory.

Comfort food is generational as well as geographical. Senegalese children take comfort in a knobby green fruit called corossol, with flesh the color, flavor and texture of custard. Ugandan children scoping out street food choose kabalagala, a deep-fried doughnut made of sweet fingerling bananas and cassava flour. And children in Guinea suck on small bags of frozen bissap, gingembre or pain de singe – hibiscus, ginger or baobab fruit juices.

Food shortages throw families and communities into crisis, and it’s mainly a distribution problem because we have enough food to feed everyone. Food shortages result from climate change, waste or spoilage, poor infrastructure, unstable markets, conflicts, politics and disease.

We rarely consider disease as a factor in hunger, but epidemics dramatically affect food availability. HIV and AIDS, by primarily killing adults between ages 25 and 45, leave the back-breaking labor of farming to the children and elderly. Annual bouts of malaria reduce a farmer’s capacity to plant and harvest. And the Ebola outbreak in western Africa threatens food security through human response.

Children_Guinea

A boy in Guinea eats a snack.

Ebola spread as people moved freely around the Western Guinean Lowland Forest that spans southern Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This shared ecosystem is home to ethnic groups whose family members extend across all three countries. Borders in the rainforest are unofficial and permeable. Initially, Ebola cases clustered in the triangle where Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia meet. But in time, as the infected sought treatment elsewhere, Ebola was transmitted to every district in Sierra Leone and to all but two of Liberia’s southernmost districts.

An early approach to limiting Ebola involved closing land borders. This tactic threatened thousands with starvation because more than three-quarters of Liberia’s produce comes from Guinea. Sierra Leone cannot cultivate enough crops to feed its population, either, and relies on trade with Guinea.

Also, Liberia quarantined towns and Sierra Leone locked down the country for a time. Because many western Africans lack a reliable source of electricity, they have no refrigeration and must purchase food daily. Otherwise, it perishes.

As World Food Day, Oct. 16, approaches, consider making a donation to our Ebola Response Fund, which will assist families affected by this deadly virus, both now and in the future.

In October, the blog is focusing on the harvest and traditional foods. Stay tuned this month for recipes from some of the countries where we work. 

How To Make Ethiopian Injera

Photos by Jake Lyell and words by Sara Woznicki, ChildFund Digital Marketing Specialist

This month, ChildFund is focusing on the harvest and traditional foods in the communities where we work, so check here often in October to find recipes and more. Today, we look at Ethiopia. The basis for Ethiopian cuisine is injera, a large flatbread that has a sponge-like texture similar to a pancake. Here’s more about injera and how it’s made:

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Notes from the Clinton Global Initiative Meeting

Anne Goddard and Bill Clinton

ChildFund President and CEO Anne Lynam Goddard and former President Bill Clinton.

 

 

It isn’t every day that you get to meet a United States president, but our president and CEO, Anne Lynam Goddard, attended the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting last week in New York City, convened by former President Bill Clinton.

On her Tumblr blog, she expresses hope and optimism about the future, despite such daunting problems as the spread of Ebola. The event, which draws business and nonprofit leaders from around the world, “reinforces my belief that if you get the right people working on a problem, anything is possible,” she writes. Read more of Anne’s reflections on the conference.

ChildFund Honored for Social Sustainability

ChildFund International’s corporate partner, Procter & Gamble Company, honored our organization with its 2014 Social Sustainability Partnership Award this week during the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in New York City. ChildFund President and CEO Anne Lynam Goddard accepted the award on ChildFund’s behalf. For seven years, ChildFund has helped administer the P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water program, which provides safe water for families living in poverty and people living with HIV and AIDS. Recently, a ChildFund-supported community in Brazil received the seven billionth liter of clean water.

“ChildFund values our partnership with P&G and the company’s support in bringing clean drinking water to people across the globe,” said Goddard. “Improving access to clean drinking water is one the world’s most important needs. We look forward to continuing our work with P&G to increase the availability and sustainability of clean drinking water in developing countries.”

7 billion liters

Claudia’s family received Children’s Safe Drinking Water’s 7 billionth liter of clean water. Photo courtesy of P&G.

Volunteer to Volunteer: Be an Advocate!

By Beth Meszaros, ChildFund Volunteer

Volunteer and advocate Beth Meszaros.

Volunteer and advocate Beth Meszaros.

Getting people to make donations to your charity of choice is never an easy task. You will send unanswered emails and hear polite noes in reply when you reach out to family, friends, colleagues. But don’t despair.

The best advice I can give you is to not only be a volunteer for ChildFund but, more importantly, become an advocate for ChildFund.

According to Merriam-Webster, an advocate is defined as “someone who publicly supports a cause or policy.” We should all be advocates or champions for children in need. I’ve made being an advocate for children and ChildFund part of who I am. I talk about my sponsored children and share my experiences every chance I get. I won’t say it’s easy, but through advocacy you can raise awareness about children in need and the incredible job ChildFund is doing to help them, and you can ultimately reach people who are willing to help. When I’m frustrated and feel like no one is listening, I just recall some of the words from my children’s letters. Things like “I love you” and “you’re part of our family.” These simple words remind me that they truly need and appreciate my help, and I go on to tell others about sponsorship.

Through advocacy, I have been able to find sponsors for several children in need, as well as one-time donations to ChildFund. I will keep on advocating for ChildFund and children all over the world because I have seen what ChildFund can do for children, and I have experienced what it feels like to help children and become a positive part of their lives.

 

Peace: The Cornerstone of Stable, Healthy Societies

Senegal children

Senegalese children march in a parade on the Day of the African Child in 2014.

Sept. 21 is the United Nations-designated International Day of Peace, celebrated throughout the world.

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

When I first moved to Senegal, I learned a local language. For official business we spoke French, but in the field we spoke Wolof, the language of teranga, kalante and jamm — hospitality, joking kinship and peace.

When greeting someone in Wolof, the answer is always “peace, only peace.” How are you, how’s your household, and your work, your farm, your herds, your day (or night), how’s the family (just double-checking) and, ending the ceremony, are you all in peace? Jamm’ rekk.

Life in Senegal was peaceful. Senegal’s first president, a famous poet and war hero, was Catholic and part of the Serère population in a predominantly Muslim, Wolof land. Léopold Sédar Senghor, who served as president from 1960 to 1980, transformed his nation into an exceptionally tolerant and democratic society. A visionary in human and economic development, Senghor led Senegal to independence.

Years later, I lived in neighboring Guinea, where joking kinship also reigns. Studying Pular there, I immediately recognized the ritual response: jam tun, only peace. Guinea’s recent history has been much more turbulent than Senegal’s, and the U.N. designated the country in its Human Development Index as one of the world’s 10 least developed.

Lacking peace, a country struggles to educate its children. It can’t provide health care, employment opportunities for youth, infrastructure or public services, safety and security, or a stable economy. Since a country and its peoples have no future without peace, peace is a human right.

Each summer, the Fund for Peace publishes a Fragile States Index (FSI), scoring countries on 12 socioeconomic and political indicators. Overall scores fall into four categories: Sustainable, Stable, Warning and Alert. A county’s FSI level often tracks closely to its HDI tier: Very High, High, Medium or Low.

The HDI measures health, education and income (adjusted for inequality) at a moment in time, while the FSI predicts future conflict. Factors such as the number of refugees, uneven economic development, the flight of educated citizens to other countries, economic decline and poverty, human rights and external influences are all taken into account to determine a country’s status in the Fragile States Index.

Over the past decade, Belarus and Indonesia — countries where ChildFund works — experienced the most notable improvements in the world. Senegal, on the other hand, shows the worst long-term performance. In 2007, Senegal was on par with Brazil. Then the country tumbled 55 places and, in the 2014 report, is now at the Very High Warning level. Why? Refugees from the conflicts in Guinea and Mali, emigration of Senegal’s educated populace, political competition and demographic pressures, such as drought, flooding, food and water scarcity and chronic malnutrition. Guinea, trapped at High Alert, is unlikely to improve. Ebola has devastated the nation’s precarious health system and damaged its economy.

Please consider sharing your peace with a child in Guinea or Senegal.

Ebola Update for West Africa

Liberia Ebola supplies

Supplies to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola virus enroute to Voinjama, Liberia.

 

ChildFund’s emergency management unit provided a status report late last week on the spread of the Ebola virus in our program areas in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Senegal, which has reported only one case so far. Read more here about Guinea, too. To help, you can make a gift to our Ebola Response Fund, which will help ChildFund support local efforts to control the virus’ spread and provide information and resources to communities.

Ebola, Guinea and ChildFund

Guinea Ebola prevention

A woman talks to her community in Guinea about preventing the spread of the Ebola virus.

Reporting by Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Ebola has sickened an estimated 4,200 people in Africa, and as of Sept. 9, 2,288 people have died from the virus, according to the World Health Organization. The spread of Ebola remains most serious in Liberia, where there have been the most deaths. Also affected are Guinea, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Senegal reported its first Ebola case last week, and officials in The Gambia are keeping close watch for cases, although none had been reported as of Sept. 9.

In Guinea, the situation appears to be stabilizing. As part of its strategy to fight the deadly Ebola virus, ChildFund Guinea identified and engaged community leaders to convey information to the public in three of Guinea’s affected communities.

Guinea healers and hunters

Traditional healers and hunters, who are helping the awareness-raising effort.

These 108 leaders include imams, priests, a pastor, traditional healers and hunters — all of whom are respected and have influence within their communities. In March, as the outbreak began, ChildFund Guinea’s office held training workshops on conducting outreach campaigns, as well as identifying and referring people with suspected cases of Ebola to health facilities.

As a result, community members have received important information about good hygiene and preventive measures from people they know and trust. The training has concluded, but information sharing continues through local groups and one-on-one discussions at Guineans’ homes and houses of worship.

To date, 35 traditional healers (10 in Kindia and 25 in Dabola) and 28 hunters involved in the project are actively continuing the efforts to contain the spread of Ebola in Guinea. These men are part of indigenous peoples, who trust them as caregivers of the land and of people. Because of their roles and influence, healers and hunters are critical to public awareness efforts.

This community-centered approach has created widespread trust and increased public support for the use of preventive measures.

The outreach campaign has yielded concrete results, as three people suspected of having the virus were referred to the Regional Hospital of Dabola. Unfortunately, these three patients died a few days later, but this intervention helped prevent further spread of the virus.

Since the end of March, no new cases have been reported in any of the communities where ChildFund works in Guinea. Nevertheless, community members continue to be vigilant and prepared to take action if they see anyone who has a suspected case of Ebola.

Read more about ChildFund’s efforts to prevent and contain Ebola in Guinea and other western African countries.

Guinea outreach on Ebola

Outreach efforts take many forms in Guinea.

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