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Creating Positive Change in Schools

Children playing a game

Children play a game with volunteers in Banten, Indonesia.

By Sagita Adeswyi, ChildFund Indonesia

In Banten, Indonesia, teachers sang about how much they would miss ChildFund and its corporate partner, Krakatau Posco, as a six-month pilot project to improve their schools was coming to an end.

“Please don’t go, ChildFund,” sang the teachers. “Please don’t go, Krakatau Posco.”

Guru Naik of ChildFund Indonesia

Guru Naik, national director of ChildFund Indonesia, gives teachers certificates.

March marked the end of Sekolahku Asik, Indonesian for “My School is Really Cool.” The project was a joint initiative between ChildFund Indonesia, Krakatau Posco, an Indonesian company, and the Community Chest of Korea to support Indonesia’s government in improving the quality of basic education.

“The Sekolahku Asik program has improved the schools’ infrastructures, teaching skills of the teachers, students’ engagement and employees’ participation in education,” says Min Kyung Zoon, president of Krakatau Posco.

The program was implemented in three elementary schools as a pilot in Cilegon, Banten, and 35 teachers from 13 schools in the region received training in interactive learning. Children attended consultation events to express what they wanted their schools to be like, voicing their views through drawing, writing and storytelling.

The schools received minor repairs, and employees of Krakatau Posco had the opportunity to volunteer at the schools, teaching children how to plant trees, wash their hands properly and how to dispose of organic and inorganic waste. More than 500 children benefited from the experience.

The schools now have better and cleaner restrooms, organized libraries with more books and fresh coats of paint on the walls.

new library

A new library at Tegal Kidongdong Elementary School.

“My school was quite dull,” says 12-year-old Novalina. “The restroom was dark and dirty. Sometimes I felt scared when I went there. I joined the competition with other students to tell what we want to be improved in our school. Now, my school looks really nice and much cleaner. We chose the color for the walls, too.”

Teachers, too, were pleased with the program: “We really like the training, as it has enhanced our knowledge and skill in an interactive teaching method,” says Tati Fatayati. “This brings changes to the students; where they might have been feeling bored with the teaching process in the class, now they feel it is more fun and interactive.”

Now that the pilot stage has ended, ChildFund and Krakatau Posco are working together to continue the program at the three schools, as well as other schools, this year.

Sekolahku ASIK

Children enjoy their refurbished schools.

Breastfeeding: ‘A World-class Intervention’

Senegal breastfeeding

At a malnutrition recovery workshop for children under 2 in Mbour, Senegal, mothers learn about the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for their children’s first six months.

By Christine Ennulat, ChildFund Staff Writer

This week, ChildFund joins organizations worldwide in celebrating World Breastfeeding Week, highlighting the benefits of breastfeeding, which could save the lives of as many as 1 million babies a year. In ChildFund’s work to ensure healthy beginnings for the youngest, breastfeeding is crucial.

Throughout the world, ChildFund-trained volunteers are working to educate families about the benefits — for both mother and child — of what the organizers of World Breastfeeding Week call “a world-class intervention.”

Senegal malnutrition workshop

Saly dances with a child attending a malnutrition workshop in Mbour, Senegal.

“Breastfeeding gives the child all the nutrients he needs,” says Saly, a community health volunteer in Senegal, to the dozen mothers seated around her on a large straw mat in a courtyard’s dappled shade. “We should consider breastfeeding even after six months, up to two years.” The women, each with a child at her breast, listen carefully. One rocks side to side. Another stares at her nursing baby, holding folds of colorful fabric away from a cheek that should be rounder than it is. Another gently jounces her little girl, who has fallen asleep and hangs limp in her arms.

Under a USAID-supported community-based health program led by ChildFund in Senegal, Saly is helping lead a nutrition and recovery workshop in her community. The participants are mothers with children under 2 whom health volunteers have identified as malnourished. Held for 10 days in a row, the workshops include growth monitoring, individual counseling and nutrition education delivered along with song and dance and a meal. “We gather the children with their mothers to teach the mothers how to help their children overcome the malnutrition,” says Saly. “When they return home, they will practice what we teach them here.” Education and support about breastfeeding is a central piece of what these activities provide the mothers who attend.

Breastfeeding is a key ingredient in preventing and treating malnutrition, but its benefits go beyond simply providing nutrients.

In many of the communities where ChildFund works, it is news to most mothers that breastfeeding within hours after birth confers antibodies that lay the foundation for a newborn’s immune system. “It’s like a vaccine for the child,” Saly says. Immediate breastfeeding benefits the mother as well, causing a hormonal shift that spurs her body to finish the process of childbirth and release the placenta.

And breastfeeding’s benefits are more than merely physiological. Saly explains, “There is a close relationship between the child and the mother during this time, because breastfeeding develops affection between the child and the mother, and it can help the mother to teach the child many other behaviors. Sometimes the child is making gestures and the mother is correcting. This is a kind of communication.”

A mother’s responses to her baby during feeding can dramatically boost brain development. So, it makes sense that breastfeeding is also associated with a three-point increase in children’s IQ.

Breastfeeding is indeed a world-class intervention: Exclusive breastfeeding from birth until six months is the single most effective intervention for preventing child deaths.

It’s surprising, then, that only 39 percent of women worldwide practice exclusive breastfeeding for their children’s first six months.

Why is that the case? The fact is that while breastfeeding may be natural, it’s not always easy. What does it take? Primarily, mothers need information and support to make breastfeeding happen. Families, health workers and volunteers, and communities at large, also need information so they understand both why breastfeeding is important and what their role is in supporting nursing mothers.

That’s why ChildFund would like to see breastfeeding goals become a global priority in international development. We invite you to add your voice to global discussions about breastfeeding, whether through social media, a note to your policymakers or just a conversation with a friend.

Or, the next time you see a mom snuggling her baby close in this very special, powerful way, give her a smile and a nod. She’s doing a good thing.

A Fresh Water Source Opens in an Ethiopian Community

water source

A dedication ceremony at a new fresh water source in Ethiopia.

Reporting by ChildFund Ethiopia

A water project in Ethiopia, which is estimated to benefit more than 16,000 people, was completed and dedicated in June after numerous technical and administrative challenges.

ChildFund Ethiopia worked with local partners in the Oromiya region of Ethiopia to provide fresh water to community members. Lacking a nearby source of clean water has been a terrible hardship to families. Before, children and women walked three to five hours to get water, which sometimes was polluted with bacteria that causes serious illnesses. Children also would be tardy to school or sometimes drop out because of the constant journeys for water.

At the dedication ceremony, Victor Koyi, ChildFund International’s east and southern Africa regional director, spoke about the need for sustainability and noted that the community will be responsible for maintaining the water source. Both community members and local government officials expressed their commitment to manage and maintain this new resource.

 

Planting, Harvesting, Eating in Brazil

community garden

Antônia, of the city of Francisco Badaró, state of Minas Gerais, in Brazil.

By Luza Marinho, ChildFund Brasil

Helping children grow up healthy and strong is a full-time job, and in Brazil, it means sowing the seeds for community gardens. ChildFund Brasil and its partner organizations are working with families in several communities to plant gardens and grow vegetables for everyone’s nourishment, especially children.

PROCAJ, one of ChildFund Brasil’s local partner organizations in the Jequitinhonha Valley, has 57 families participating in the project Planting, Harvesting, Eating. They grow vegetables for their households at the children’s community center, and the rest of the crops are sold, generating income for the families.

gardening in Brazil

“Today we ate freshly baked vegetables and helped in feeding the kids at school. They have vegetables on the table every day,” says Maria, 68.

For many mothers involved, the project goes beyond physical nourishment; Uca says she has seen her self-esteem grow stronger as well. “Before the garden, I took anti-depression medication,” she says. “Today I don’t need it.”

Maria adds that the community gardens have also changed to how the community sees the families: “We were discredited; they used to say that we didn’t like working, that we just liked to plead. PROCAJ gave us confidence, believed in our efforts and our willingness to grow and succeed in life.”

pineapple

Giving Delayed Learners a Boost in India

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

At Avadi Municipal Middle School in Thirvalluru, India, the story of the animal kingdom is literally painted on the walls. Each day, students entering the school are greeted by a massive mural, a colorful landscape with wild animals in their environment.

On another wall of the fourth-grade classroom are posters demonstrating fruits and vegetables and their importance in our daily diet.

computer in Indian school

Students have access to computers at school now.

“These are things our students get to see every day,” teacher P. Jayanthi says. “They not only see those paintings and posters but learn a lot from them. Now, it is easy for us to teach our students through these materials.”

The paintings and other learning materials were made available to the school by ChildFund India under its Enhanced Education Quality Improvement Program (EQuIP). Supported by the Caterpillar Foundation, this program is being implemented in about 100 primary and middle schools around Chennai, the capital city of the southernmost Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

The three-year project, which started in September 2011, seeks to make comprehensive quality improvements in 100 schools in Villivakkam and Ambattur areas of Thiruvallur and Chennai districts of Tamil Nadu. These schools are run by the government and most students are from impoverished homes. Many are from the first generation of their families to attend school, so they may lack full support at home. So far, the project has reached more than 4,800 students.

“These wall paintings and hangings have made our task fairly easy. They not only help the classroom look great, but also help us in a great way to engage children in learning activities continuously,” says Mercy, a teaching assistant.

“All the classrooms of our school have some kind of thematic wall paintings, and we have observed that the paintings have helped gain students’ focus and increase learning,” she adds. “This has helped us greatly in teaching slower learners or those who take a longer time to grasp any subject material. We are thankful to ChildFund India for this support.”

School Management Committee

The School Management Committee.

Under EQuIP, schools were provided with learning modules specially designed for delayed learners, as well as workbooks, whiteboards, pencils, art materials, science sets, ceiling fans, round classroom tables and computers, among other resources. ChildFund has also appointed teachers trained to work with delayed learners.

The project has the following key objectives:

  • Improve the physical environment to make it more conducive for learning.
  • Promote an interactive and participatory learning environment.
  • Increase community involvement in and support for high-quality education initiatives.
  • Increase awareness regarding education initiatives and their importance among stakeholders.

“Many slower learners suffer from low self-esteem and lack confidence,” says teacher N. Nalini. “You can address this not only by praising small achievements but also by personalizing lessons.

“I always keep this in mind and encourage them to work on their learning abilities. I encourage children to use our learning materials to observe, predict and solve problems. I invite them to tell stories and revise lessons on a regular basis. They like the attention given to them.” When the project started last year in this school, about two dozen children were designated as delayed learners. Now, 20 of these students have improved dramatically and are at par with their peers, she adds.

Eight-year-old Pallikondal had a problem in identifying animals a year ago. But today, she says, “I know everything about these animals in this painting,” pointing to the elephants.

School Management Committee member M. Laxmi is pleased about the progress her three grandchildren have made at school. “They are all doing well in their studies. I am very happy.”

pallikondal

Pallikondal, 9, shows us an elephant on the classroom mural.

Making a Mexican Dream Come True

Chucho and his bakery colleagues

Chucho (left) started the Nheki Bakery in his Mexican community.

By Esperanza Soto Aburto, ChildFund Mexico

At the age of 12, Jesus — or Chucho, as he’s known to friends — was part of the Organization Hñañhu Batsi, a community group in Mexico. He played soccer and was part of a team that won a regional tournament.

Today, as an adult, he has worked with teens who belong to the same organization, a local partner with ChildFund Mexico.

“I was looking for the kids to bring out their character, and teaching them teamwork,” Chucho says. But it was also important for him to open a business, making good on what he calls his “Mexican Dream,” which has special significance since he immigrated to the United States when he was 15, returning later.

With other young people in his community, Chucho began to figure out what the needs of the community were, and there were no bakeries.

That’s how the Nheki Bakery was born; nheki means “me too” in Chucho’s native language, Hñañhu.

“At first I wanted to name the bakery ‘I undertake,’ ” Chucho says, “but there is no translation of this word to Hñañhu, so I named it Nheki: ‘I want, I can, me too!’ ”

They started making doughnuts, biscuits, bread, buns and other pastries, sweetening them with agave honey produced in the community. The yeast and jams also are made locally.

The bakery has been open for almost a year, and Chucho and his colleagues are considering opening more bakeries in the region. ChildFund Mexico is now a trading partner, buying bread from the Nheki Bakery for children enrolled in the Early Childhood Development programs. Chucho realized that there is work to do in his community, and with a lot of effort and sweat, there’s always a chance to create opportunities.

Bikes Equal Freedom

Are you watching the Tour de France this month? Some of us at ChildFund are, and although we love the competition among professional cyclists, the Tour also makes us think about what other purposes bicycles serve. They provide a way to get to and from school safely, as well as a tool for fun, exercise and fresh air. What do bikes mean to you?

 

bike-collage-pic

Photos from Benin, Cambodia, Honduras, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.

Dominica Launches National Effort to Curb Sex Abuse

Dominica faces a sex abuse crisis, but its government is working with NGOs and communities.

By Gelina Fontaine, ChildFund Caribbean Program Manager

In Dominica, everyone is affected by child sexual abuse in some way. With a population of just 73,000 people, the Caribbean island saw more than 700 reports of abuse between 2009 and June 2014. That’s one in every 104 people.

If there isn’t a case of abuse within his or her immediate family, a Dominican resident — child or adult — likely has a friend, a cousin or a neighbor who has experienced it. That’s why the island’s national government, along with entities like ChildFund, is taking action to stem the tide of abuse, which most often takes the form of incest or sexual exploitation of boys.

In June, ChildFund and other nonprofit organizations created the 13-member Dominica NGO Coalition for the Protection of Children and Youth. Members include the National Council of Women, the Caribbean Male Action Network, the National Youth Council, the Dominica Association of Disabled Persons and others.

ChildFund currently serves as its secretariat and has funded the establishment of the coalition and its advocacy efforts. The coalition’s vision is for a Dominica where children and youth are free from all forms of violence, which reflects ChildFund Alliance’s global campaign to include this goal on the United Nations’ Post-2015 Agenda.

Every two weeks, the NGO Coalition meets to discuss incidents of child sexual abuse and updates on earlier cases, calling on the police, Dominica’s Ministry of Social Services and the Social Welfare Division, medical personnel and concerned families to make sure that survivors are able to receive the support they need, particularly when they pursue justice.

Meanwhile, ChildFund has worked with communities to address another side of this serious problem, with the Shine a Light project, which focuses on ways to prevent gender-based violence. In addition to other programs, we are working with boys and young men so they’ll make healthy choices while showing respect toward their female peers.

ChildFund Caribbean also has worked to make communities aware of the huge presence of abuse through radio, TV, print and online media — as well as on a grassroots level, promoting weekly conversations among children, youth, parents and other community members. These meetings give participants a chance to discuss the effects of abuse and possible solutions.

In coming weeks and months, coalition members will advocate for critical reforms needed in the legal system, child care institutions, mandatory reporting requirements and other protective measures.

In Senegal, Mobilizing Communities to Fight Violence Against Girls and Women

In 2012, ChildFund launched a program called Shine a Light in four countries, thanks in large part to a major gift from a concerned donor. The project’s goal is to raise awareness of gender-based violence, assist child survivors of sexual abuse and help communities develop child-protective systems and responses. In four blog posts, we have learned about the progress made in the countries; today, we focus on Senegal. To read the rest of the series, click here. If you want to help women and girls gain greater independence and empowerment, we have some ideas.

By Danielle Roth, Technical Coordinator for Youth Programs

Senegalese children experience gender-based violence at home and school and in their communities, which amount to an overall environment of pervasive fear and persecution, particularly for girls. A recent study found that in Senegal, 74 percent of schoolgirls have been sexually harassed, 22 percent have experienced an attempted rape, and 8 percent have been raped. Other studies have shown that the people likely to perpetrate this violence are often known to the victim — a classmate, a boyfriend, a neighbor or a teacher.

Senegalese girl

Most Senegalese girls are personally affected by gender-based violence.

Gender-based violence, or GBV, is a problem of substantial proportions. It is also an issue with deep roots embedded in socio-cultural norms and community dynamics such as expectations around masculinity and femininity, power dynamics within the household and rigid gender roles. ChildFund is working with Senegalese communities to help them respond to and prevent GBV.

So, what exactly are we doing?

ChildFund works in the Tattaguine and Kolouckmbada areas of the Mbour district to address GBV against children and youth 6 years and older, through a community-led and action-oriented approach known as the community action cycle. This method of community mobilization includes four steps: 1) forming groups, (2) self-diagnosing challenges in the community, (3) developing action plans and (4) carrying out action plans.

From January through June 2014, six child protection groups, composed of community members themselves who are vulnerable to GBV and including both young people and adults, met to discuss some of the most pervasive GBV issues in their communities. These groups then developed their action plans, which outlined key steps they wanted to take in partnership with their communities to address these issues.

The groups chose to focus on community mobilization and advocacy with authorities around rape, early and forced marriage and early pregnancy. An example of the successful work of one group involves a case of forced marriage. A young woman, aged 14 — we will call her Mawa — was forced to leave school when her mother received a pre-dowry gift.

Mawa says, “One day, around 8 p.m., while I was learning my lessons in my mother’s room, she called me to introduce me to two young men. She told me with a very low voice that I should be very kind with one of the men because he had come to ask me for marriage. When I told her that I did not want to get married — I am a student and I want to stay at school — she told me that if I did not love the guy and if I refuse this marriage, she will no longer support me.”

Mawa was left with no choice. To prepare her for marriage, Mawa’s mother withdrew her from school and sent her to the capital, Dakar, to work as a housemaid.

When the youth group in her village learned of Mawa’s situation, they brought the case to the newly formed child protection group. The group then met with Mawa’s mother to negotiate for her return under circumstances that the mother would find amenable but that also recognized Mawa’s human rights.

Mawa had no idea that all this was going on. “One Sunday, my mother called and asked me to come back to my town to resume my studies,” she says. “It is then that I learned that it was thanks to my village child protection committee that I was able to return home.

Cases like Mawa’s are not uncommon in Senegal, and that is why child protection groups like the one in her community are so important. To deepen this vital work, ChildFund will continue to support the child protection groups through another community action cycle.

 

Reflections of Life in Kenya

Reporting by ChildFund Kenya

Children enrolled in ChildFund’s programs near Nairobi participated in an art exhibition featuring photos and paintings they made, often depicting their surroundings.

 

Weslyne

Weslyne and his photo.

Weslyne, who is 13, shows a photo he took of the Dandora dump near his home. Covering an area of 30 acres, the dump accepts about 850 tons of solid waste generated daily by the 3.5 million inhabitants of the city of Nairobi, Kenya. The dump, which is the largest in Africa,was once a quarry that the City Council of Nairobi sought to use temporarily. But it still exists, 40 years later, despite having been declared full.

Residents have to live with the stench, trash and dirt. Waste pickers pounce on trash once it is offloaded by incoming trucks. Birds, pigs and people scavenge heaps of rubbish for food, scrap metal, polythene bottles and bags, which are often sold. Weslyne explains that the dump also attracts children and youth who would rather scavenge than go to school. His photo shows a boy drinking water from a bottle that was probably scavenged from the trash.

Dennis and his painting.

Dennis and his painting.

Dennis, 14, also lives in Dandora. He explains that many children in his school smoke. Because of lack of parental guidance and peer pressure, boys will begin to start smoking to “fit in, be cool and be adultlike.”

 

Regina and her photograph.

Regina and her photograph.

Regina, 14, comes from Mukuru’s fuata nyayo (the Swahili term for outskirts). Mukuru is a slum on the eastern side of Nairobi. It is one of the largest slums in the city, with a population of around 700,000. Mukuru is sub-divided into eight villages and is located in the middle of the main industrial area of the city, bordering the Nairobi River. It is characterized by congestion, narrow alleys, poor drainage, lack of sanitary facilities and open sewers. Regina explains that her photo shows children walking alone and dangerously close to the edge of the river.

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