ChildFund International

Midwife Training in Timor-Leste

By Dirce Sarmento

Maria in Training

Maria during the practical training session at the National Hospital, Dili.

It was her first midwife training session in more than 10 years, but Maria de Fatima Moniz made it clear she was up for the challenge. She seized a valuable opportunity this past June and participated in a two-week midwife training facilitated by ChildFund Timor-Leste and Instituto Nacional de Saude (National Institute of Health) in the Covalima district.

During her first week, Maria, 38, learned the “55 Steps” — guidelines used by midwives to ensure the safe delivery of newborns and appropriate care for pregnant women. The second week of training, based in Dili’s National Hospital, gave the group of 17 midwives the opportunity to use their practical skills while under close supervision.

“During this training, I felt very fortunate to be able to learn new knowledge about the 55 steps and safe deliveries,” Maria says.

With more than 15 years of experience caring for mothers and newborns, Maria will use the information she learned to improve the delivery process she practices in her community. She is the only midwife for five sucos (villages) in Covalima — a community of approximately 7,500 people — and works at the Tilomar clinic. Tilomar has no running water, so she has to ask families to bring their own to use during and after delivery.

“The problem we have now in our community is that we don’t have any materials for delivery, like baby napkins, and no sterile delivery set,” Maria says. Despite these challenges, Maria has successfully delivered countless babies at the clinic. She hopes that conditions will improve.

As a mother of four children, Maria understands how important it is to support pregnant women at each stage of their delivery. “After this training, I hope what I learned will help local women have clean and safe deliveries and that [maternal and infant] mortality in Timor-Leste will be reduced.” Since she began working at the clinic in 2000, she says, eight women have been taken to Suai hospital for caesareans, and two babies have died.

Tilomar Clinic

The Tilomar clinic was repaired by ChildFund’s local partner, Graca, in 2011.

In Maudemo suco, where Tilomar clinic is located, 48.7 percent of births from 2005 to 2010 were assisted by a skilled health provider. Comparing this to Timor-Leste’s countrywide average of 33.5 percent highlights how Maria’s hard work is making a real difference to women and children in her community.

With new skills and support through ChildFund Timor-Leste’s project, Improving Health Outcomes for Children in Covalima District, Maria can improve the level of care for pregnant women and newborns in Tilomar. “I am grateful for ChildFund helping us in Covalima. I hope we can improve the future of this cooperation, because we still confront problems implementing the safe delivery,” says Maria. “I hope next year ChildFund can support us to give us refresher training on safe motherhood and supervision.”

Italian Trainer Shares Soccer Secrets with Bolivian Kids

By Abraham Marca, ChildFund Bolivia

In ChildFund Bolivia, sports are used as a tool to teach children discipline, boost their self-confidence and promote integration. These days, one game in particular seems to be on everyone’s mind — soccer.

Davide Tibaldi

Davide Tibaldi played soccer with the children and taught them new techniques.

When Davide Tibaldi, a well-known trainer at the Italian Juventus Soccer School, visited one of our local partner organizations in Oruro, Bolivia, he created quite the buzz. He shared his coaching experiences with local trainers and spent time teaching soccer techniques to children enrolled in the Niño Quirquincho Feliz Project.

“Bolivia is a country with great human value,” Tibaldi says. “Children are educated, respectful, and they want to learn. They show great enthusiasm towards sports, and that’s a strength we must work with.”

Group Photo

Students from the Niño Quirquincho Feliz Project, their coaches and Davide Tibaldi pose for a group picture.

Tibaldi left Bolivia with a strong belief that children have enormous potential when given access to physical, team activities such as sports. He sees soccer as a huge motivator and promised to send study materials about the game to both children and their teachers. His contribution will mean so much to the students who participate in the program.

“I never thought this could happen to me,” says Alex, 17. “He is the coach that works with champions! It makes me feel important, respected and linked to my family. They all like soccer. We all play at home, even my mom!”

Tibaldi’s workshop taught Ruben, 13, new tactics to use in the neighborhood league he plays in after school. For Ruben, the league is a fun and positive way to spend his free time. “If you want to play soccer you must have a healthy body,” he says. “Soccer is healthy and fun and much better than hanging out with gangs or learning bad habits.”

Driven by Compassion: Pete Olson’s Race for Children

By Loren Pritchett, ChildFund staff writer

Pete Olson

Pete Olson

In the 30 seconds it took him to watch the ChildFund commercial, Pete Olson, Formula car racer, knew he wanted to sponsor a child. The decision was quick, but he was no stranger to speed.

Fast forward more than a decade later and, today, Olson is supporting his third sponsored child and racing in the name of children in need. Behind the wheel, he is in control but admits that compassion is really what drives him.

“It’s an incredibly rewarding experience,” he says. “You can change a child’s life and give them opportunities that many of us take for granted.”

Opportunities like getting a quality education and receiving proper nutrition are among those Olson knew as a small child, adopted into a loving family. He credits his own success to his adopted parents’ support and saw sponsorship as a way to share his good fortune. He began sponsoring as a student at Boston University.

“I felt that many of us there were privileged and lucky to have the opportunities that we did,” he says. “It was a point in my life where I started to feel it was important to give something back for all that I have been so grateful to have in my life.”

Olson maintained child sponsorships while earning two degrees, a regional racing license and pursuing his passion for speed. He excelled from motorcycles to professional karting and eventually found himself racing in China – thousands of miles from U.S. tracks but only a few hundred from his sponsored child, Trang.

“She writes a lot about her schooling, which she really seems to enjoy,” he says. “That makes me very happy as I think education is something that we tend to take for granted back home. In many other countries, children don’t have the same opportunities for education.”

Trang

Trang, 11, lives in Vietnam.

Trang, 11, lives in Vietnam. In some rural areas of the country, children are discouraged from attending school because their classrooms are too far away. Other areas of the region lack clean drinking water and have inadequate sanitation facilities. With Olson’s support, Trang is able to attend school regularly and benefits from the various ChildFund health and nutrition programs in her community.

Pete in Race Car

Olson races for children in  the Zhuhai International Circuit, Asia Formula Renault Series

With a desire to help more children like Trang, Olson now races in the Asia Formula Renault Series and does so for children in extreme poverty. The ChildFund logo that shines from the side of his red Formula car is an invitation to all of his fans – sponsor a child. And although he aspires to be the first American to win the series this year, he knows this is much bigger than winning.

“I’ve stopped keeping track of the wins,” he says. “No matter what’s going on in my own life, I know without a doubt that in another part of the world I am bringing joy and happiness to a child in need, enriching their life and providing them with opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have.”

Olson plans to visit Trang soon to learn more about her family, community and where she goes to school. In the meantime, he continues his race for children.

Are you a racing fan? Catch Pete Olson September 15-16, October 20-21 and December 8-9. Check your local listings to find out how you can watch the races. Or stay updated on Facebook or www.peteolson.com. To learn more about sponsoring a child, speed over to the ChildFund website.

Lefties: A Day Just for You

By Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

It’s International Left-Hand Day. Who knew? Not wanting to miss an opportunity, we did a quick check around the ChildFund Kenya office for our left-handed colleagues.

Esther Ndungu in our finance department and Eunice Kilundo in programs were good sports and agreed to share their stories.

How was it growing up using your left hand?

Left-handed woman

Esther

Esther: People used to imitate me; some would get very mad and say my parents failed to teach me how to use my right hand.

Left-handed woman

Eunice

Eunice: Throughout my school life, including college, my classmates teased and made fun of me by imitating me as I wrote and as I played (throwing a ball with “the hand”). They found it funny as I tried to write while seated at a right-hand desk. I could even catch some of them staring as I ate! I guess they thought I would miss my mouth or something.

What have you heard about left-handedness?
Esther: Left-handed are bright people and they are lucky. They think with both sides of the brain…that they are very smart. They die early….

Eunice: I grew up feeling different, strange. My unsuccessful attempt to “change my hand” frustrated me. By and by, my perception changed. I now find it humorous when people get surprised that I am a leftie! I try teaching them the “art” of throwing a ball, eating without missing my mouth. It’s nice to tickle people once in a while by doing something so natural to me… being me.

Any thoughts you have about being left-handed?
Esther: We are unique people in our own way.

Thumbs-upEunice: They can do anything and everything. Just try and find us the left (not right) scissors, enough lecture room seats and allow us to be. To my fellow lefties: Guys, take it easy and go for anything including the presidency: George H.W. Bush, Clinton, and Obama did!

Happy Left-Handers Day!

Partnering With Youth

By Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

In the spirit of this year’s International Youth Day theme, Building a Better World: Partnering with Youth, ChildFund Kenya invited its team of interns to share their thoughts on working with ChildFund this summer. The Kenya office provided various hands-on learning opportunities to help prepare these young people for future employment. Here’s what they had to say about their experiences.

Magdalene, APHIA Plus intern

Magdalene

Magdalene works with the APHIA Plus Program (AIDS Population and Health Integrated Assistance Plus) and has gained a new sense of professional confidence. “I have enjoyed the opportunity. The team has much trust and confidence in me. My supervisor has guided me well, and I am able to take up new challenges. It makes me feel so proud to be associated with ChildFund.”

Sammy - sponsor relations intern

Sammy interned with sponsor relations.

Sammy felt like a part of the ChildFund team from the very start. “The welcome was awesome! There’s awesome teamwork and the facilities are great. Being in ChildFund makes you grow in all aspects and my experience has been nothing but splendid.”

Elton sponsor relations intern

Elton busy at work in the sponsor relations department.

Elton enjoys the learning opportunities offered by colleagues in the SR department. “The first time I came here, there was a lot of work; being new at it, I wondered if I could perform. I was immediately trained, supported and encouraged. I enjoy the different lunch treats and our many health talks.”

Eric, from the IT department, sees beyond the technical side of his job and realizes the importance of philanthropic work. “ChildFund is an organization that touches lots of lives out there in a very positive way. I have always had a heart to help the needy in whatever way possible, even as a student. I think with the great support from local and international well-wishers, ChildFund can continue to greatly increase the realization of Kenya’s vision.”

Dephine, Finance Intern

Daphine working in the finance department.

Daphine was able to get a behind-the-scenes look while working in the finance department. “When we had a finance meeting, chaired by our finance director, it was so engaging and interactive. I had never attended such a meeting. It felt really good to be included, and I learned a lot regarding my job and building relationships with colleagues.”

When asked her thoughts on organizations partnering with young people, she said, “Youths should be given the opportunity in organizations that nurture their skills and talents. They should be involved in social activities that allow free interaction with their peers to help improve their self-esteem and desire to change their lives.”

And we agree.

As we get ready to celebrate International Youth Day, ChildFund Kenya will continue to motivate our young people in our office and in our programs to join conversations relevant to their daily lives, contribute to ideas that will solve global youth issues and celebrate the power of global collaboration.

Interning at ChildFund

by Mark Robinson, Communications Intern

I came to ChildFund unsure of what to expect from my first internship. We’ve all heard horror stories of interns who spent their summer filing papers and picking up packages. I didn’t want the best professional relationship I forged to be with the baristas at the nearest Starbucks. I wanted to get outside of my comfort zone. I wanted a chance to grow.

markinternblog

At ChildFund, I felt like more than just “the intern.”

I’m fortunate to have had the opportunity to come to work for 10 weeks as a respected member of the ChildFund communications team. Every project I’ve worked on has been purposeful. And aside from a now infamous assignment my mentor Cynthia Price gave me, I have been spared from doing too many “interny” tasks.

From day one, my mentors, Community Manager Virginia Sowers and Director of Communications Cynthia Price, took my goals into consideration and tailored my assignments to help me accomplish them. Because of their flexibility, I was able to focus on improving my multimedia skills. I researched podcasts and edited raw footage from Uganda into a video that was featured on ChildFund’s blog, Facebook and Twitter pages. My work has been showcased, not hidden away. But with all that said, I doubt when I look back at ChildFund that I’ll remember the work.

I’ll remember poking my head over ChildFund writer Christine Ennulat’s cubicle to chat about my most recent journalistic pursuits.

I’ll remember the shock I felt when I learned KISS front man Gene Simmons sponsors more than 140 children through ChildFund and the subsequent buzz around the communications pod after the episode of his reality show filmed in Zambia debuted.

I’ll remember the disbelief I felt when I found out my colleague and longtime ChildFund employee Alison Abbitt passed away following reconstructive knee surgery. We had spoken only days before.

While the extremes stand out, the small lessons I’ve learned here will not be forgotten and this, my first formal foray into the professional world, has prepared me in some ways for my next adventure: Botswana.

My next four and a half months will be spent studying journalism at the University of Botswana in Gaborone. It’ll be my first trip abroad, so my feelings about it fluctuate between giddy excitement and crippling nervousness on a day-to-day basis. I do now, however, have the comfort of knowing that a network of sympathetic world travelers is only an email away.

While I’m in Africa, I plan to freelance in pursuit of my career as a foreign correspondent. Who knows? Maybe one of my stories will find its way into ChildWorld.

Easing Transitions: Zambia’s Stepping Stones Program

By Christine Ennulat

The high school dropout is a familiar phenomenon. But an elementary school dropout? In developing countries, it’s a common problem.

“Your first-grade classroom may have 135 kids in it,” says Mary Moran, ChildFund senior specialist in Early Childhood Development. “Your second-grade classroom has 60, and by the time you get to fifth grade, you may be in a class of 10 or 12.”

ChildFund’s Stepping Stones program, in Zambia’s Mumbwa region since 2009, eases the transition between early childhood and primary school environments, helping more children stay in school.

Children at ECD Center

Children gather to start their school day at an Early Childhood Development Center in Zambia.

For a child who is moving to primary school, whether from home or one of ChildFund’s Early Childhood Development (ECD) centers, the change is often a shock. A typical primary school is a teacher-centered, highly structured setting with little individual attention and few to no materials with which to work or play.

The primary school teacher usually has little training in child development or in education methods for young children. Parents may have had no school experience at all, which means no understanding of the school process or how to support their children in it.

Stepping Stones connects teachers, parents and children. Teachers from ECD classes and first-grade classes collaborate on a plan for understanding each other’s practices and expectations. Groups of children and teachers may visit classrooms, or parents may take their children individually. Teachers from both settings spend time in each other’s classrooms. They’re also trained in how to engage with parents and families.

Parents @ ECD Center

Parents participate in a learning activity with their children.

Likewise, parents receive coaching on how to engage and interact with teachers, as well as to recognize when their children are under stress or having other difficulty. All adults work in concert on behalf of the children.

The Stepping Stones program supports children as they learn lifelong skills: resiliency, adaptation to change and how to recognize the differing expectations of people and environments. To help them, teachers are trained in social-emotional learning strategies, from understanding different learning styles to new ways to structure classrooms and schedules that help children prepare for change and provide them with a sense of control.

“We now know how to ask questions of children,” said one teacher who has participated in Stepping Stones. “I thought my role was to make sure the children know the information.” As they learned their new role as guides rather than givers of information, teachers also noted that children were more apt to both ask for help and share their enthusiasm for learning. The level of parents’ engagement was another pleasant surprise.

When the time came for a graduation ceremony to honor the transition, some of the preschool teachers literally handed the children over to the primary teachers as parents looked on. “In one case, a child told us that graduation was really important because he had his first taste of cake,” Moran laughs. “Another told us that what was so important to her was that her community gave them a book to write in, and it was the first time she had ever had a book.”

Child walking to school

A student walks to his primary school classroom.

On the first day of primary school, only one of the 143 children cried. But both the teachers and the parent were prepared to support the child. It took only a handful of days for him to find his footing.

Reducing Violence Against Children in the Caribbean

by Patricia Toquica, Regional Communications Manager, ChildFund Americas

banner for conferenceAs a member of the Global Movement for Children, ChildFund is actively participating this week in the Sub-Regional Meeting for Follow-up on the United Nations Study on Violence Against Children in the Caribbean, taking place in Kingston, Jamaica, May 14-15.

Marta Santos Pais, special representative of the U.N. Secretary-General on Violence against Children, and the Honorable Lisa Hanna, Jamaica’s Minister of Youth and Culture, are among the 150 delegates from CARICOM (Caribbean community) member-states, civil society groups and adolescents participating in the meeting.

The initial U.N. study— the most comprehensive global report on violence against children—was presented to the U.N. General Assembly in 2006. It includes several recommendations to protect children against all forms of violence. Sub-regional meetings are being held to monitor and assess progress.

Gelina Fontaine presents on ChildFund’s work to protect children.

Gelina Fontaine, ChildFund Caribbean program manager, presented on ChildFund’s life stages approach and programs to combat violence against children in Dominica and St. Vincent, as well as our active child advocacy work in the region.

speakers on stage

Paul Bode (l), regional director for ChildFund Americas, addresses the sub-regional U.N. meeting on violence against children.

Paul Bode, ChildFund’s regional director for the Americas, is moderating the discussion on information systems and research needed to support public policy strategies and plans to prevent violence against children.

For more than 10 years, ChildFund, as a member of the National Early Child Development Council and the Child Rights Committee, has been contributing to national policy discussion in the Caribbean. Our approach and experience in partnership with local public and private organizations has continuously influenced the National School Crisis Management Policy and the National Child Friendly Schools Approach in both Dominica and St. Vincent.

ChildFund Caribbean is also currently conducting a study on Family, Community and Gender-Based Violence in cooperation with the government of Dominica. We believe the results will contribute to improved public policy and prevention programs that address many forms and effects of violence against children.

Learn more about the Stop Violence in the Caribbean movement, and follow the discussion on Facebook and Twitter.

Innovate. Collaborate. Illuminate.

Guest post by Jen Butte-Dahl, Nokero

Jennifer Butte-Dahl is the head of alliances and the Bright Future Fund at Nokero International Ltd. Nokero (short for No Kerosene) develops affordable and environmentally friendly technologies that eliminate the need for harmful and polluting fuels used for light around the world, and then partners with local organizations to reach communities who need light most.

We can learn a lot from kids. In a phrase, they keep it simple. Kids don’t talk about building innovative partnerships, or crafting collaborative alliances. Kids find other kids who have similar interests, or have something they want or need, and they make friends. They play together, they learn from one another and they bring their diversity of talents together to shape the lives they live. My niece, Kaitlyn, is seven and a budding artist. She loves drawing little girl stick figures with skirts, long hair and high heels. Her best friend Sophie has a penchant for flowers and houses. They work together and fill countless sheets of construction paper with their vivid imaginations, creating colorful works of art together that are better than anything they could ever create on their own. And decorating many a fridge!

At Nokero, we are constantly working to hold ourselves to the lessons we learn from children. “Keep it simple” is one of our core values, and it touches everything we do, from designing new products to making new friends.

solar light

Nokero Ed

Today, we’re unveiling the Nokero Ed, a small solar light with a big mission: to change the lives of kids around the world who live without electricity. At the same time, we’re launching a friendship with ChildFund International, an organization with the drive and the know-how to help us get these little lights into the hands of children around the globe who need them. Our friendship is simple: we want the same things, and we each have something to bring to the relationship.

Boy studying by solar light

A light for studying.

It all began with an innovation. Steve Katsaros, Nokero’s founder and chief inventor, was visiting Kenya late last summer, and was inspired by the children he met. They were enthusiastic to learn, eager for knowledge and excited by everything new. In each village, he handed out a few solar lights and asked for their feedback. But it wasn’t necessarily their words that made the most impact. It was the groups of kids crowding around each light to read and do their homework after dark. Sometimes two or three at once, but more often five or six, or ten, or more. It was uplifting and heartbreaking all at once. There was never enough light to go around.

Youth studying by solar light

Students gather to share the light.

When considered next to the daily, and oftentimes enervating cost of kerosene fuel, solar light is clearly the economical choice. Yet even a modest upfront cost holds many families back from making the switch from toxic kerosene lamps to clean, safe and healthy solar light. So Steve set out on a mission: design for extreme affordability. Keep it simple. Remove the bells and whistles. Make a solar light that could help kids learn and would be economical enough for more families to afford. Once we had the prototype in hand, we knew we had a powerful difference-maker for children around the world. But we needed to reach them.

And this is where ChildFund comes into the story. As serendipity would have it, we saw a ChildFund billboard while standing at a bus stop in Washington, D.C. The public service ad simply stated their mission: ChildFund is dedicated to improving the lives of vulnerable children worldwide—and that is exactly what we were looking for. It really is the perfect friendship. We bring the technology; they help deploy it to the communities who need it most. ChildFund programs serve more than 13.5 million children in 31 countries around the world. The majority of those children either live in unelectrified communities, or their families cannot afford electrical power.

So now we’re working together to bring sustainable and nontoxic solar light to the millions of children around the world living without access to electricity. Together, we are illuminating lives. Funds raised through the Global Light to Learn Challenge will support ChildFund in bringing clean, healthy Nokero solar lights to schools in unelectrified communities. Students will be able to study and read after dark, by checking out a light each night (just as they would a library book). The lights will also be used in classrooms to teach students about science, technology, renewable energy and the power of the sun.

An innovative partnership? Definitely. A collaborative alliance? Sure. But at its core, simply a great friendship between two organizations that can now achieve more together than they ever could alone. Together, we are coloring the world brighter, and drawing little suns and smiley faces all over the place.

One Day Without Shoes

by Cynthia Price, ChildFund Director of Communications

My morning routine was thrown off a bit today.

Usually I stare at my closet deciding which pair of shoes to wear. It’s a good problem to have because it means I have a closet full of shoes.

Working for ChildFund helps me to count my blessings more frequently. Many of the children we serve in developing countries don’t have shoes. They walk barefoot and get cuts and scrapes, which often become infected. Many children get diseases from walking barefoot.

In some communities, children can’t go to school if they don’t have shoes. Or the long trek to school may simply be too far to walk barefoot.

Decorated feet

Creative!

Today at ChildFund we’re participating in One Day Without Shoes, which seeks to raise awareness about those who don’t have the luxury of shoes. We’ll spend the day at work barefoot. We’ll have activities. Employees will be invited to walk barefoot in a “Walk Box,” where they can experience how difficult it is to walk across pebbles.

When I first started talking about a day without shoes, I heard some interesting comments. “I’m not walking across the parking lot. There are stones.” Another person said, “Are you kidding? There are staples in the carpet.”

I would simply respond, “Isn’t that the point?”

We take for granted our ability to walk anywhere we want, thanks to the multiple pairs of shoes in our closets. Just for today, try going barefoot. Try following in the footsteps of their tiny feet – without shoes.

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