Gifts of Love and Hope

Goats Contribute to a Brighter Future

Fernanda and her goat

Fernanda and her family’s goat.

By Silvia Ximenes, ChildFund Timor-Leste

Nine-year-old Fernanda’s family tends a garden in Manatuto, Timor-Leste, with corn, long beans, bananas and cassava that feed Fernanda and her four siblings, with enough left over to sell and make a small income. Now, they have a goat too, which they received earlier this year.

“We don’t have a rice field, as most people do, but only a small plot of land for vegetables,” says Fernando, Fernanda’s father. “We only do farming in which the production is very low and not enough to sustain family needs. We really wanted to do some other things in order to support family’s income, like buy goats, but we have no money. So we are lucky and happy to receive the goat.”

Fernando’s family is one of 10 families who received a goat this past spring. Fernanda and her siblings enjoy taking care of the 10 goats, which are kept in the same field. “After school I pull out the goats, feed and give them drink and let them eat the grass,” says Fernanda, who wants to become a teacher.

“Once our goat has multiplied, then I will sell some to buy my children’s school materials — such as books, pens, uniforms, et cetera,” says Fernando.  “Moreover, we will also have some for family consumption.”

It is quite rare for families in Manatuto to include meat in their meals, as it is too expensive and in limited supply. “We can only eat goat’s meat when there is a cultural event or ceremony, which probably happens about two to five times a year,” Fernando says.

“With respect and happiness, I want to thank the donors who provide us goats,” he adds. “We will take care of them.”

Fernando hopes his children will have a promising future. “I want them to have a good education and later to have a job, so they can have a better life. I will keep supporting them with my own efforts to help them realize their dreams.”

How Climate Change Affects Timor-Leste

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

When I grew up near Lake Erie in Ohio, I lived on the north coast; or, taking a Canadian perspective, the south shore. As an adult, I moved to England’s south coast, then the west coast of Africa, and finally, the east and west coasts of North America.

family farm in Timor-Leste

Most of Timor-Leste’s residents are subsistence farmers, growing crops for their families to live on.

Water attracts people. It’s no coincidence that oceans, blood and amniotic fluid all share the same concentration of salt.

Worldwide, three out of five people live in coastal areas, and 50 million call tiny islands home. Although Small Island Developing States (known as SIDS) produce less than 1 percent of global greenhouse gas, their inhabitants suffer most from climate change. Of the 51 countries classified as SIDS, 12 are also among the least developed — including Timor-Leste, where ChildFund works. It gained its independence from Indonesia in 2002.

More than half of Timor-Leste’s population lives in poverty. The United Nations predicts its population will triple to 3 million by 2050, and the country faces a temperature increase of 1.5 degrees Celsius (3.4 degrees Fahrenheit) over that time, according to a 2012 report from the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

We must account for climate change as we address poverty, simply because of its impact on the availability of water and food.

About two in three Timorese people already suffer from food insecurity; half of Timor-Leste’s population is under age 15, and malnutrition affects half of the children under age 5. In Timor-Leste, the hungry season lasts from October through February — until maize, the primary crop, is ready for harvest.

Although 85 percent of Timorese practice subsistence agriculture, the country cannot meet its nutritional needs, partly because insects, fungi and rodents ruin a third of the harvest during storage. Crops suited to the Timorese climate — such as rice, maize, wheat, barley, arrowroot, cassava, sweet potato, potato, cowpeas, red beans, peanuts and coconuts — provide acceptable caloric intake but insufficient protein. For its population to survive, Timor-Leste imports food and exports coffee.

Pedro and his chicken

A gift of chickens can help children get the nutrition they need to develop into healthy adults.

So, what happens if Timor-Leste gets hotter and more crowded? Interactions between carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and water are complex. The so-called “CO2 fertilization effect” benefits certain crops, such as rice, sweet potatoes and peanuts. Others, however, experience harm, especially maize and cassava. Too much carbon dioxide causes cassava leaves, an excellent source of protein, to become toxic.

Warmer temperatures cause crops to mature faster but at reduced yields. Peanut harvests, for example, could shrink by one-fifth. Warmth also favors pests, so incidence of insect damage and fungal diseases will increase. And farming requires rainfall at crucial stages. If Timor-Leste doesn’t receive enough — or gets too much — rain, the crops currently cultivated there may no longer thrive.

Coffee beans are especially vulnerable to heat, and if they don’t adjust to higher temperatures, farmers will move their plants up the central mountain, increasing deforestation and soil erosion.

Climate change also puts Timor-Leste at greater risk of floods, landslides, cyclones and drought — disasters that already affect the country. Grain yields decreased by 30 percent in 2007, due to a drought caused by El Niño, a disruption in the Pacific Ocean related to unusually warm temperatures. Climate models indicate a high likelihood of another El Niño event in 2014.

Climate change is a serious concern around the world, and it often seems like too great a problem for one person. But if each one of us does our part, we can make a difference; you can help improve the diets and incomes of families in Timor-Leste by making a gift of goats, cows or chickens.

The Impact of Goats in Guinea

DialloReporting by Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

ChildFund Guinea’s staff met with Mamadou Aly Diallo, coordinator of the Denkadi Federation of Dabola, a local partner organization that has provided support with distribution of goats, sheep and other items to 135 families living in need in Guinea. The goats were purchased by ChildFund supporters in the Gifts of Love & Hope catalog. Here is an interview with Diallo (pictured at left):

Please tell us about this project.

Diallo: We participated in a project that allowed us to support 700 children with school supplies and 135 families with goats and sheep for breeding; fertilizers, seeds and insecticides for gardening, and we also provide household latrines.

 

Goats in Guinea

Guinean families with their new goats.

What benefit will the goats and sheep give these families?

Diallo: Families that receive goats have the potential to improve their lives. We thought it was beneficial to focus on this potential by providing them with the necessary skills, knowledge and animals that will permit them to take charge of their future.

In our communities, the populations are basically local farmers. Those who have the means purchase cattle that they use to cultivate land on a large scale, yield more products and generate more income. But poorer families cannot afford to rent or buy cattle.

However, there is a barter system that exists in these communities, giving people the opportunity to exchange goats or sheep for cattle; at least four sheep or goats equal one cow. Nevertheless, the idea behind providing goats and sheep to families is not limited to obtaining cattle. In a short time period, they can cultivate a herd of goats or sheep, which are easier to sell in local markets for quick income, allowing them to gain confidence and recognition in their villages. That’s why we thought that goats and sheep could be a solution for the short or long term.

 

goats getting immunized

Goats get immunized to keep them healthy.

How did the project work? 

In 2013, we identified 135 extremely poor families who use traditional tools and bare hands to do their farming work, have only two small meals a day and whose children are not enrolled in school but rather work on their farms. Initially we provided a total of 200 animals (140 sheep and 60 goats) to 100 families (one pair per family). Later in September, the remaining 35 families received 140 sheep for breeding (two pairs per family).

Before delivering the animals to the families, the Federation signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Animal Husbandry. They immunized these animals and administered de-wormers.

 

What is the current state of the first 200 animals given to families?

Diallo: According to the Department of Animal Husbandry, 75 percent of the animals have reproduced. We are told that the children of these families play happily with the young animals, cherish them and also learn to care for them. We are hopeful that in a few years’ time, these families will be financially independent enough to plow their land, pay school tuition for their children and meet their basic needs.

Give a Gift That Grows

chicken with eggs

Ten-year-old Bisafikade of Ethiopia and his chicken. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Hooray, it’s spring! (For many of us on the East Coast and in the Midwest, it’s been a long time coming.) Let’s celebrate by giving gifts that grow, like chickens, goats and fruit trees.

Families in countries where ChildFund works have requested these as specific needs, among others. Livestock and plant seeds are gifts in more than one way, because they produce food that families can eat and sell. A pair of dairy goats provides milk, cheese and yogurt; fruit trees produce nutritious fruit and seeds that can grow into more trees. And chickens lay eggs, which frees up family income for other needs like education and health care.

These gifts often make a difference in a child’s ability to attend school or have proper clothing and shoes, because families can make income from selling surplus fruit, dairy products or eggs. Please consider giving a gift from our online catalog or by calling us at 1-800-610-9013. Thanks, and let’s enjoy the season.

 

Make a Resolution to Help a Child

By ChildFund International staff

Drawing from USA.gov’s list of popular New Year’s resolutions, we’ve come up with ways to give a child something he or she needs. This may even keep you on track toward reaching your goals. 

1. Eat healthy foods – If you’re committing to eat healthier this year, consider making a donation to start a vegetable garden for families living in Ecuador. Each family will receive fruit and vegetable seedlings and agricultural supplies to grow and improve their own gardens. 

dream bike

Mangala receives her Dream Bike from ChildFund India in Maharasthra.

2. Lose weight – You’ve joined the gym, and those cycling classes are brutal, but providing a bicycle for a young girl in India or Sri Lanka will help ease a child’s pain. Many girls walk long distances to school, which can be unsafe and often leads to their dropping out early. While you sweat it out in class, just think of how happy you’ve made a child who now can get to school on time. 

3. Quit smoking – According to the American Lung Association, the average retail price of a pack of cigarettes in The United States is $5.51. For less than one pack of cigarettes a day, you can sponsor a child and change his or her life forever by providing him or her access to an education, better health care and other basic needs. 

4. Get a better education – Most Americans would agree that having access to a good education is important to becoming self-sufficient and improving your quality of life. As you set out to continue your education this year, consider donating to our scholarship fund for girls in India. 

5. Take a trip – Now that you’ve kicked smoking, sponsored a child and saved money, you definitely deserve to take the trip that’s been on your bucket list. Why not visit your sponsored child? If you can make the trip, ChildFund staff will arrange a visit. You can see the world and view firsthand how your contribution is helping your sponsored child.

sponsor visit in Guatemala

Lester (center) spends time with his sponsor in Guatemala.

Happy 2014, and good luck keeping your resolutions!

Last-Minute Shoppers, Take a Breath

the gift of a goat

Perina, 8, and her family in Zambia have benefited from the gift of a goat. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Many of us are in a big rush to finish our Christmas shopping, decorating or holiday meal-planning. Let’s all slow down and take a moment to think about our blessings — and the millions of children who go without nutritious food, education and clean water. Instead of driving to the mall one more time, consider purchasing an item from our Gifts of Love & Hope catalog in the name of a friend or family member.

For $150, you can feed 25 orphans in Kenya for a week. In several countries, families have requested chickens; for $29, you can provide a family with three chickens. In the Philippines, children lost their homes and all their belongings in Typhoon Haiyan last month. We’re still collecting funds to help families rebuild in these communities, and your assistance is greatly needed.

All of the gifts in the catalog are items requested by the families we serve, and they fit different budgets and priorities. Best of all, you can print out a personalized card to your loved one so he or she will know how this gift is helping a child in need. Thank you for considering these children during the holiday season.   

On Giving Tuesday, Give a Girl a Dream Bike

By Christine Ennulat, ChildFund Senior Writer

Giving Tuesday is a day dedicated to giving back.

giving tuesdayAnd today, we will be doing our part by trying to reach a goal of providing bicycles to 1,000 girls who live in rural villages in Sri Lanka and India — so they can continue their path toward education and economic independence.

In developing countries the world over, girls are up at the crack of dawn, getting ready to leave for school. They have to be, because their morning ritual includes a long, long walk — two miles, three miles or more.

A Year Ago

In Sri Lanka, Sanuja’s trek to school is a gravel road through a deep wilderness, especially scary in the dark. But she has no choice if she is to take advantage of the evening classes her school offers to help children make up ground lost while Sri Lanka’s schools were closed during the recent civil conflict. So, Sanuja leaves the class early or skips it entirely to be home before dark.

In rural India, snakes or scorpions often block Shakuntala’s path to school. Sometimes streams rush down from the hillsides and across the way during the monsoons. Her classmate Hirabai once faced a pack of wild boars.

Both girls remember stopping to help friends who had hurt themselves on the poorly maintained roads, and being late for it. At their school, when anyone is late for any reason, they are made to stand outside of class for an hour.

Dream Bike in India

A girl and her Dream Bike in India.

Today

Sanuja’s attendance at school and her special classes is now regular and punctual, and her grades have improved dramatically — with the gift of a Dream Bike.

Shakuntala, who wants to become a teacher and support her widowed mother, and Hirabai, who aspires to be a police officer, feel much more confident that they’ll be able to achieve their dreams, thanks to the gift of a Dream Bike.

As we focus on giving gifts during the holiday season, consider the girls of India and Sri Lanka who could live happier lives with greater educational and job opportunities, better health and economic freedom. Donate a Dream Bike.

Are You Ready to Give a Goat or a Duck?

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Some of you are already getting ready for the holiday season, and so are we at ChildFund. But instead of stocking stuffers, we’re thinking about livestock, as well as other gifts that families in need have requested.

Our Gifts of Love & Hope catalog has been updated this fall with new items that will go a long way to help children pursue an education, provide families with extra income and protect the health of infants and expectant mothers. As always, the catalog includes gifts that have been requested by the families we serve around the world, so we are fulfilling specific needs. Let’s take a look at what’s available in the catalog!

Farm Animals

rabbit

Rabbits are an important gift that help families bring in extra income. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Goats were our most popular item in the catalog last year, with nearly 1,000 goats going to families in need. You can still give a dairy goat for $99, or you can choose to provide three goats or a whole herd. Children need milk and other dairy products, and the gift of goats, which can provide a source of income, also can lead to greater prosperity for families and access to education for children and youth.  

Ducks and rabbits also are helpful gifts, and they too provide greater self-sufficiency. Also, children can help with the care and feeding of these animals, which provides a sense of purpose and responsibility.

Nutritional Needs

Families in Sierra Leone can harvest rice quickly when generous donors provide high-yield rice seeds for $73 or include farming tools with the gift of seeds for $269. This will make a significant difference in the lives of children who otherwise may suffer from undernutrition. In Honduras and Bolivia, families have asked for eco-friendly stoves to replace fireplaces that pollute their homes with smoke and toxic fumes, often causing asthma and other respiratory ailments.

Water Resources

water filter in Indonesia

In parts of Indonesia, water is contaminated with volcanic ash and other toxins. A water filter is very helpful for families.

A lack of clean water is a persistent challenge in many of the communities ChildFund serves, causing disease and even limiting educational opportunities. As we’ve observed in the communities we serve, when a school doesn’t have a source of clean water nearby, children spend less time in class or may not go at all. In the catalog, we offer water filters for families in Indonesia for $74, so children can drink water free from volcanic ash and other toxins. For a drought-stricken community in Mozambique, you can purchase a share of a water-catchment system that will help 8,000 schoolchildren have greatly improved access to clean water.  

Healthy Mothers and Babies

In many of the communities we serve, expectant mothers face extreme challenges. Sometimes they have to travel a long way for prenatal care, and some don’t have the resources to go to the hospital to give birth. In Maluso in the Philippines, there is no birthing center, and the closest hospital is 18 miles away. So, ChildFund is working to fund a center where women can have their babies safely. With your donation, we’ll be able to purchase a delivery table, a scale to measure infants and baby thermometers to make a local health post a safe place to give birth.

We have many more gifts that may appeal to you, and they definitely will do a great deal of good for children and families who are living in poverty. Thanks for your consideration during this holiday season.

Giving Girls the Support They Need

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Today we celebrate the second International Day of the Girl Child, declared by the United Nations General Assembly to recognize girls’ rights. In 2012, the day focused on ending child marriage, and this year’s theme is related: Innovating for Girls’ Education.  

Years ago, when I began working in the developing world, I thought I knew the reasons behind girls’ early marriage and lack of education. But the longer I lived there, the more I discovered complexity and nuance. We still struggle to end child marriage and educate girls.

Imagine for a moment you’re a teenaged girl living in a developing country.

Your name means beautiful.

Guinean students

These girls are part of the student government in their primary school in Guinea.

At the beginning of each school year, your brothers move to the district capital to board with distant relatives. While they learn math, chemistry and physics, you pound rice in a mortar and pestle, cook meals over a three-stone fire, and tend the family’s garden, goats and chickens. Each week on market day you harvest avocados and mangoes to sell in the open-air market, bartering for whatever you can’t grow — rice, flour and oil.

You carry water home from the river in a basin on top of your head, moving slowly to avoid spilling the precious liquid. In sunny weather, you wash laundry by hand, laying clothes out on bushes to dry.

Each day, you gather branches from the forest, carrying them tied in a bundle on your head. At home you chop the wood into equal lengths to feed between the stones of your cooking fire.

In the evenings you prepare snacks to peddle in the streets: grilled peanuts, popcorn and ginger juice. Hearing the generator at the local bar shut off, you stack bowls of your mother’s specialties on your head and hurry to meet the village men as they celebrate the latest soccer match.  You offer fried plantains, sweet potatoes and cassava, crisp with fragrant peanut oil.

This month, you turned 15. Soon, you expect to marry a man at least twice your age. Within another year, you’ll carry your first baby on your back. You hope your husband will allow you to return to school or learn a trade.

Long ago, your older brothers passed their high-school leaving exams. The eldest studies engineering at university. The second graduated from teacher-training college, and the third works at a nearby government office — one of the few salaried occupations in your country.  

Your parents rejoice in their sons’ academic success; it brings your family a measure of economic security — an excellent return on investment. Your family will prosper.

You and your older sister completed primary school with certificates of merit, exceeding your community’s expectations. Your family speaks of you with pride. Your domestic skills attracted the attention of respectable families in the village, and your father now has several alliances to consider. Whomever he chooses as your husband will pay a substantial dowry.

Had you stayed in school, your marriage options would be fewer. An educated girl sparks no interest among village men. After a certain age, a girl cannot marry and enjoy the security of a husband. Your mother argued for you to leave school — like your sister before you — to prepare for marriage. Your father sadly agreed.

You are his favorite, the child he carried, running for miles to a hospital, as you convulsed with malaria. An old man now, he fears he can no longer protect you.

You will be beautiful on your wedding day.

Please help us celebrate International Day of the Girl Child with a Dream Bike for a schoolgirl in India or Sri Lanka, or a year’s scholarship for a girl in Ethiopia.

girl_child_graph

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