Gifts of Love and Hope

Give a Gift That Grows

chicken with eggs

Ten-year-old Bisafikade of Ethiopia and his chicken. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Hooray, it’s spring! (For many of us on the East Coast and in the Midwest, it’s been a long time coming.) Let’s celebrate by giving gifts that grow, like chickens, goats and fruit trees.

Families in countries where ChildFund works have requested these as specific needs, among others. Livestock and plant seeds are gifts in more than one way, because they produce food that families can eat and sell. A pair of dairy goats provides milk, cheese and yogurt; fruit trees produce nutritious fruit and seeds that can grow into more trees. And chickens lay eggs, which frees up family income for other needs like education and health care.

These gifts often make a difference in a child’s ability to attend school or have proper clothing and shoes, because families can make income from selling surplus fruit, dairy products or eggs. Please consider giving a gift from our online catalog or by calling us at 1-800-610-9013. Thanks, and let’s enjoy the season.

 

Make a Resolution to Help a Child

By ChildFund International staff

Drawing from USA.gov’s list of popular New Year’s resolutions, we’ve come up with ways to give a child something he or she needs. This may even keep you on track toward reaching your goals. 

1. Eat healthy foods – If you’re committing to eat healthier this year, consider making a donation to start a vegetable garden for families living in Ecuador. Each family will receive fruit and vegetable seedlings and agricultural supplies to grow and improve their own gardens. 

dream bike

Mangala receives her Dream Bike from ChildFund India in Maharasthra.

2. Lose weight – You’ve joined the gym, and those cycling classes are brutal, but providing a bicycle for a young girl in India or Sri Lanka will help ease a child’s pain. Many girls walk long distances to school, which can be unsafe and often leads to their dropping out early. While you sweat it out in class, just think of how happy you’ve made a child who now can get to school on time. 

3. Quit smoking – According to the American Lung Association, the average retail price of a pack of cigarettes in The United States is $5.51. For less than one pack of cigarettes a day, you can sponsor a child and change his or her life forever by providing him or her access to an education, better health care and other basic needs. 

4. Get a better education – Most Americans would agree that having access to a good education is important to becoming self-sufficient and improving your quality of life. As you set out to continue your education this year, consider donating to our scholarship fund for girls in India. 

5. Take a trip – Now that you’ve kicked smoking, sponsored a child and saved money, you definitely deserve to take the trip that’s been on your bucket list. Why not visit your sponsored child? If you can make the trip, ChildFund staff will arrange a visit. You can see the world and view firsthand how your contribution is helping your sponsored child.

sponsor visit in Guatemala

Lester (center) spends time with his sponsor in Guatemala.

Happy 2014, and good luck keeping your resolutions!

Last-Minute Shoppers, Take a Breath

the gift of a goat

Perina, 8, and her family in Zambia have benefited from the gift of a goat. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Many of us are in a big rush to finish our Christmas shopping, decorating or holiday meal-planning. Let’s all slow down and take a moment to think about our blessings — and the millions of children who go without nutritious food, education and clean water. Instead of driving to the mall one more time, consider purchasing an item from our Gifts of Love & Hope catalog in the name of a friend or family member.

For $150, you can feed 25 orphans in Kenya for a week. In several countries, families have requested chickens; for $29, you can provide a family with three chickens. In the Philippines, children lost their homes and all their belongings in Typhoon Haiyan last month. We’re still collecting funds to help families rebuild in these communities, and your assistance is greatly needed.

All of the gifts in the catalog are items requested by the families we serve, and they fit different budgets and priorities. Best of all, you can print out a personalized card to your loved one so he or she will know how this gift is helping a child in need. Thank you for considering these children during the holiday season.   

On Giving Tuesday, Give a Girl a Dream Bike

By Christine Ennulat, ChildFund Senior Writer

Giving Tuesday is a day dedicated to giving back.

giving tuesdayAnd today, we will be doing our part by trying to reach a goal of providing bicycles to 1,000 girls who live in rural villages in Sri Lanka and India — so they can continue their path toward education and economic independence.

In developing countries the world over, girls are up at the crack of dawn, getting ready to leave for school. They have to be, because their morning ritual includes a long, long walk — two miles, three miles or more.

A Year Ago

In Sri Lanka, Sanuja’s trek to school is a gravel road through a deep wilderness, especially scary in the dark. But she has no choice if she is to take advantage of the evening classes her school offers to help children make up ground lost while Sri Lanka’s schools were closed during the recent civil conflict. So, Sanuja leaves the class early or skips it entirely to be home before dark.

In rural India, snakes or scorpions often block Shakuntala’s path to school. Sometimes streams rush down from the hillsides and across the way during the monsoons. Her classmate Hirabai once faced a pack of wild boars.

Both girls remember stopping to help friends who had hurt themselves on the poorly maintained roads, and being late for it. At their school, when anyone is late for any reason, they are made to stand outside of class for an hour.

Dream Bike in India

A girl and her Dream Bike in India.

Today

Sanuja’s attendance at school and her special classes is now regular and punctual, and her grades have improved dramatically — with the gift of a Dream Bike.

Shakuntala, who wants to become a teacher and support her widowed mother, and Hirabai, who aspires to be a police officer, feel much more confident that they’ll be able to achieve their dreams, thanks to the gift of a Dream Bike.

As we focus on giving gifts during the holiday season, consider the girls of India and Sri Lanka who could live happier lives with greater educational and job opportunities, better health and economic freedom. Donate a Dream Bike.

Are You Ready to Give a Goat or a Duck?

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Some of you are already getting ready for the holiday season, and so are we at ChildFund. But instead of stocking stuffers, we’re thinking about livestock, as well as other gifts that families in need have requested.

Our Gifts of Love & Hope catalog has been updated this fall with new items that will go a long way to help children pursue an education, provide families with extra income and protect the health of infants and expectant mothers. As always, the catalog includes gifts that have been requested by the families we serve around the world, so we are fulfilling specific needs. Let’s take a look at what’s available in the catalog!

Farm Animals

rabbit

Rabbits are an important gift that help families bring in extra income. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Goats were our most popular item in the catalog last year, with nearly 1,000 goats going to families in need. You can still give a dairy goat for $99, or you can choose to provide three goats or a whole herd. Children need milk and other dairy products, and the gift of goats, which can provide a source of income, also can lead to greater prosperity for families and access to education for children and youth.  

Ducks and rabbits also are helpful gifts, and they too provide greater self-sufficiency. Also, children can help with the care and feeding of these animals, which provides a sense of purpose and responsibility.

Nutritional Needs

Families in Sierra Leone can harvest rice quickly when generous donors provide high-yield rice seeds for $73 or include farming tools with the gift of seeds for $269. This will make a significant difference in the lives of children who otherwise may suffer from undernutrition. In Honduras and Bolivia, families have asked for eco-friendly stoves to replace fireplaces that pollute their homes with smoke and toxic fumes, often causing asthma and other respiratory ailments.

Water Resources

water filter in Indonesia

In parts of Indonesia, water is contaminated with volcanic ash and other toxins. A water filter is very helpful for families.

A lack of clean water is a persistent challenge in many of the communities ChildFund serves, causing disease and even limiting educational opportunities. As we’ve observed in the communities we serve, when a school doesn’t have a source of clean water nearby, children spend less time in class or may not go at all. In the catalog, we offer water filters for families in Indonesia for $74, so children can drink water free from volcanic ash and other toxins. For a drought-stricken community in Mozambique, you can purchase a share of a water-catchment system that will help 8,000 schoolchildren have greatly improved access to clean water.  

Healthy Mothers and Babies

In many of the communities we serve, expectant mothers face extreme challenges. Sometimes they have to travel a long way for prenatal care, and some don’t have the resources to go to the hospital to give birth. In Maluso in the Philippines, there is no birthing center, and the closest hospital is 18 miles away. So, ChildFund is working to fund a center where women can have their babies safely. With your donation, we’ll be able to purchase a delivery table, a scale to measure infants and baby thermometers to make a local health post a safe place to give birth.

We have many more gifts that may appeal to you, and they definitely will do a great deal of good for children and families who are living in poverty. Thanks for your consideration during this holiday season.

Giving Girls the Support They Need

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Today we celebrate the second International Day of the Girl Child, declared by the United Nations General Assembly to recognize girls’ rights. In 2012, the day focused on ending child marriage, and this year’s theme is related: Innovating for Girls’ Education.  

Years ago, when I began working in the developing world, I thought I knew the reasons behind girls’ early marriage and lack of education. But the longer I lived there, the more I discovered complexity and nuance. We still struggle to end child marriage and educate girls.

Imagine for a moment you’re a teenaged girl living in a developing country.

Your name means beautiful.

Guinean students

These girls are part of the student government in their primary school in Guinea.

At the beginning of each school year, your brothers move to the district capital to board with distant relatives. While they learn math, chemistry and physics, you pound rice in a mortar and pestle, cook meals over a three-stone fire, and tend the family’s garden, goats and chickens. Each week on market day you harvest avocados and mangoes to sell in the open-air market, bartering for whatever you can’t grow — rice, flour and oil.

You carry water home from the river in a basin on top of your head, moving slowly to avoid spilling the precious liquid. In sunny weather, you wash laundry by hand, laying clothes out on bushes to dry.

Each day, you gather branches from the forest, carrying them tied in a bundle on your head. At home you chop the wood into equal lengths to feed between the stones of your cooking fire.

In the evenings you prepare snacks to peddle in the streets: grilled peanuts, popcorn and ginger juice. Hearing the generator at the local bar shut off, you stack bowls of your mother’s specialties on your head and hurry to meet the village men as they celebrate the latest soccer match.  You offer fried plantains, sweet potatoes and cassava, crisp with fragrant peanut oil.

This month, you turned 15. Soon, you expect to marry a man at least twice your age. Within another year, you’ll carry your first baby on your back. You hope your husband will allow you to return to school or learn a trade.

Long ago, your older brothers passed their high-school leaving exams. The eldest studies engineering at university. The second graduated from teacher-training college, and the third works at a nearby government office — one of the few salaried occupations in your country.  

Your parents rejoice in their sons’ academic success; it brings your family a measure of economic security — an excellent return on investment. Your family will prosper.

You and your older sister completed primary school with certificates of merit, exceeding your community’s expectations. Your family speaks of you with pride. Your domestic skills attracted the attention of respectable families in the village, and your father now has several alliances to consider. Whomever he chooses as your husband will pay a substantial dowry.

Had you stayed in school, your marriage options would be fewer. An educated girl sparks no interest among village men. After a certain age, a girl cannot marry and enjoy the security of a husband. Your mother argued for you to leave school — like your sister before you — to prepare for marriage. Your father sadly agreed.

You are his favorite, the child he carried, running for miles to a hospital, as you convulsed with malaria. An old man now, he fears he can no longer protect you.

You will be beautiful on your wedding day.

Please help us celebrate International Day of the Girl Child with a Dream Bike for a schoolgirl in India or Sri Lanka, or a year’s scholarship for a girl in Ethiopia.

girl_child_graph

Literacy Plays Critical Role in the Fight Against Poverty

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

When you were young, did your parents read you bedtime stories?

One summer my youngest sister lived with me. She was 18, between high school and college. My daughter was 6. Every night, I read the two of them bedtime stories. Together, we finished the Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Hobbit and the entire Chronicles of Narnia.

Sept. 8 is International Literacy Day, a time to recognize how crucial literacy is to social development, along with the intrinsic benefits of reading and writing.

mother and children reading

This family in Timor-Leste participated in a family literacy program supported by ChildFund.

Children in developing countries often don’t share the experience of bedtime reading. At night, when families sit together in the darkness, parents sometimes tell stories — folk tales or oral history about ancient gods and kings, proud empires and illustrious ancestors. But many of these adults are illiterate, and books are scarce in their countries. Electricity, if it exists at all, is unreliable. On the equator, days are short. The sun rises at 6 a.m. and sets at 6 p.m. every day, regardless of the season.

In some countries where ChildFund works, there are no bookstores or public libraries; lack of demand results in no supply. Whatever reading material is available is far too expensive for all except the very wealthy. In the end, there is no culture of reading.

Even school classrooms often lack textbooks. Teachers lecture from hand-written notebooks — signed and stamped by the government ministry. They write on the chalkboard, and children copy into their own notebooks. Transcription errors handed down over the years create some misconceptions.  

Research shows that, during story time, children bond with their parents, learning to read by matching the colorful pictures in their books to the storyline. Children also learn to think critically by observing the characters’ behavior. Bedtime stories begin a lifetime of reading.

Literacy is a fundamental human right. According to UNESCO, it’s the foundation for lifelong learning. It transforms lives, empowering people to improve their health, education and income. Without literacy, social and human development stalls.

girl reading

Ishara enjoys a moment with a book in Sri Lanka.

UNESCO’s theme for International Literacy Day 2013 is Literacies for the 21st Century. In the United States, elementary school children learn computer-literacy skills, which are considered critical to success in modern society. Yet most of my 19-year-old information technology students in Guinea had never seen a computer.

Our measures for literacy in developing countries are limited to basic book-literacy. In Afghanistan, only 12 percent of youth attend secondary school. Of all of the countries we serve, Ethiopia has the lowest youth literacy rate — 63 percent for males and 47 percent for females. Only 16 percent of Ethiopian youths attend secondary school.

In many African countries, achieving literacy in their country’s official language (English, French, Spanish, Arabic or Portuguese) doesn’t occur until secondary school. Elementary school children are mostly taught in their local languages. They may not be able to write letters to their sponsors without assistance.

Please help us build awareness on International Day of Literacy with a donation of storybooks, a scholarship for a girl, or bicycles to help young girls attend school safely.

An Ethiopian Girl Gets Closer to Her Dream

The United Nations declared Aug. 12 as International Youth Day in 1999, so ChildFund is taking this week to focus on challenges that especially affect teens and young adults, as well as celebrate young people who are showing strong leadership in the countries we serve.

Reporting by ChildFund Ethiopia

Mekdes, an 18-year-old girl from Ethiopia, received a one-year scholarship in March 2012 through ChildFund and our Twitter followers to mark International Women’s Day. We checked back with her in July 2013 to see how she was doing. 

“I trained in hair dressing for six months and graduated in September 2012,” Mekdes reports. “I started working in one hair salon in our village four months ago, earning a monthly salary of 600 birr [approximately US$32] that enabled me to fulfill our basic needs and cover the medical cost for my grandmom, who has asthma. I have also bought a cell phone for myself and also started to fulfill my needs, such as clothing and shoes.”

Mekdes of Ethiopia

Mekdes has graduated from a cosmetology program and is now working toward having her own business.

Mekdes was chosen as a scholarship recipient for a Twitter campaign ChildFund launched in honor of International Women’s Day. She had encountered many hardships, having lost her father at a young age; her mother couldn’t take care of Mekdes on her own. She also had to drop out of secondary school despite having good grades after her grandmother lost her job. When we met her last year, Mekdes had to work as a hairdresser and a day laborer, but today she has the hope of one day owning her own business.

She has passionate feelings about International Women’s Day because it demonstrates that all women have the potential to be productive and involved in community development. Mekdes also explained that since women are vulnerable in many ways and are sometimes affected more by poverty, the need for supporting them in their pursuits is important.

“In the future, I have a plan to get further training in a boys’ beauty salon, and I have a plan to open my own beauty salon,” Mekdes says. “After fulfilling the income need, which is a priority for us to survive, I will continue my education. I would like to thank ChildFund for helping me to be successful in my life.”

Kin Is the Focus on International Day of Families

 By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Think about your most important memories. Who figures in them? Your family, most likely.

Indian family

Neetu (center) and her family in India.

So what makes a family? The United Nations defines family in residential terms: a household of people related by blood, marriage or adoption, making common provisions for food, shelter and other essentials of survival.

The U.N. designated 1994 as the Year of the Family, and since 1996, it has recognized the International Day of Families, celebrated annually on May 15. This year’s theme is “Advancing Social Integration and Intergenerational Solidarity.” In other words, bringing many kinds of societies and different generations together, including vulnerable groups, so they have a voice in political, social, cultural and economic decisions.

Honduras family

Oscar and his family in Honduras.

By nature, families make long-term commitments. Parents care for children and, in turn, adult children support ill and elderly parents. Especially in developing countries, families share resources across generations. Families also decide together about major purchases, work division and savings.

What Households Look Like

Marriage, childbearing, adoption, death, migration and divorce directly affect households. Income and other socioeconomic variables affect fertility rates and — over time — the number of children. Other factors such as delayed marriage, reduction in child mortality rates and housing shortages can lead to an increase the number of adult children living at home.

Ethiopian family

Lemlem (center) and her family in Ethiopia. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Large households with many children correlate with low personal income and, on a national basis, high fertility rates correlate with low gross national product (GNP).

In the countries we serve, three-fourths of households include two spouses, although in Sub-Saharan Africa, one-third of families have a single parent or a single grandparent as head of household. In Kenya, where elderly widows often raise grandchildren orphaned by AIDS, more than a third of households are female-headed.

Effects of Migration

Youth migration poses another challenge to family structures. In Africa, rural poverty and youth unemployment is reaching crisis proportions, affecting communities we serve in Ethiopia, The Gambia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mozambique, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Uganda and Zambia.

In 1950, only 11 percent of Africans lived in cities, but by 1996, nearly a third had migrated from rural areas in search of jobs, social mobility and other opportunities. The U.N. projects that half of all Africans will live in urban areas by 2025. Family ties still survive because city dwellers often send money home, but distance and poverty can shred such bonds.

As we acknowledge the fragility of families, we also celebrate their inherent strengths — loyalty, support and shared history. We invite you to invest in training for young adults and single mothers through a gift to our Family Livelihood fund.

This Mother’s Day, Consider Helping a Mom

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund staff writer

Having children is hard work, no matter where you live and what kind of assistance you have available. But think of a mother living in a developing country. She may not be able to give birth in a hospital, and she may lack the proper nutrition that both she and her baby need to survive. As we prepare to celebrate Mother’s Day, here are some ways to show your appreciation for mothers who are striving to raise children in difficult circumstances. You even can give a gift in your own mother’s name if you’d like.

A Ugandan mother brings her child to a nutrition day in Budaka District. Photo by Jake Lyell.

A Ugandan mother brings her child to a nutrition day in Budaka District. Photo: Jake Lyell.

The Mama Kit, available through ChildFund’s Gifts of Love & Hope catalog, has supplies for a pregnant woman in Uganda to use during and after delivery, and qualified health professionals provide education for women to ensure safe birthing experiences. This is important because Uganda has a high infant mortality rate of 64 deaths for every 1,000 live births (2012), according to the CIA World Fact Book.  For $35, an expectant woman and her baby have a better chance to survive.

Another item in the catalog is medicine for children and mothers in Liberia, protecting them from parasites, malaria and low hemoglobin levels. For $50, you can help stock ChildFund-supported clinics, which are run by trained community health volunteers. Health posts bring vital medication and education to communities that would otherwise go without.

Vietnamese girls and mother

A Vietnamese mother and her two daughters.

The catalog features other gifts that make for great Mother’s Day presents. Mothers in Vietnam will benefit greatly from a small micro-loan of $137, which will allow them to start their own agricultural businesses. The income they earn provides food, clothing and educational opportunities for their children. In Honduras you can buy books for first-grade classrooms for only $9. When children learn how to read, the whole family benefits.

Mothers around the world want the best for their children. This Mother’s Day, consider helping a mom.

The Mama Effect

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 755 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter