History

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Looking Back, Looking Forward

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

We’ve reached the final post of our 75th anniversary blog series: number 75. When this series started back in September 2013, I wasn’t sure this day would ever come, but it is here.

I’d like to take a moment to thank the ChildFund staff members who sat down for interviews, wrote stories, took photos, searched for archived photos and video, edited posts and made story suggestions. Your help was invaluable. Also, to all of the ChildFund Alliance leaders who contributed posts about their organizations’ work — thank you. It’s amazing that some of the countries where we worked decades ago are now strong and prosperous enough to help other children in need today.

During the series, we learned a great deal about the origins of ChildFund, which was called China’s Children Fund when it was founded in 1938 by Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke to help Chinese orphans. Over the years, our leaders and staff members — both in Richmond, Va. and abroad — have transformed our organization (renamed Christian Children’s Fund in 1951 and ChildFund in 2009) from a small but ambitious charity to a global aid organization that assisted more than 18 million people worldwide last year. 

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Some of the most memorable posts for me were about children and alumni who have seen great change take hold in their lives.

Gleyson, a young man from Brazil, wrote about his neighborhood, which was plagued with violence stemming from the drug trade. It also didn’t have running water. But he was sponsored and enrolled in a ChildFund-supported project that provided him with tutoring, study materials, extracurricular dance and art classes, and above all, a supportive environment.

Today, he writes, “I graduated with a degree in business administration, and I am a professional, registered with the Regional and Federal Brazilian Administration Councils and specializing in financial management and controllership. I recently purchased a car, and I’m currently employed in a company in charge of the administrative management of condos.”

We heard many encouraging stories like Gleyson’s. Manisha’s family was able to quit the bangle-making trade in Firozabad, India, finding more lucrative and less hazardous work; Nicky, a Zambian man, earned a degree in business administration and went to work for a bank. Many of the Chinese orphans who grew up in Hong Kong orphanages started by CCF have found professional and personal success, and an amazing number have formed their own charities to help other children. My colleague, Christine Ennulat, wrote an essay about how we can’t count the number of people that have been helped through ChildFund — because our actions have a ripple effect.

ChildFund will continue our work as we enter our 76th year, focusing on children and their families and giving support to communities in need — while providing training and resources through our local partner organizations, a process that lets communities determine their destinies. On the world stage, we are pushing for greater recognition of children’s needs as the United Nations sets its post-2015 development goals.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll leave you with a message from our CEO and president, Anne Lynam Goddard:

“Because nothing lasts forever, I never take for granted that ChildFund will continue for another 75 years. The decisions we make today will impact the ChildFund of tomorrow. We must continue to evolve as an organization, meeting the needs of children in a rapidly changing and complex world.

“Maybe one thing does last forever — the warm-hearted generosity of people who help children living in poverty. That part of our shared humanity is truly enduring.”

Indonesia 75th celebration

THANK YOU!

Memories from a Childhood in Hong Kong

Ming Chik Chan sent a letter a few months ago to Steve Stirling, ChildFund’s executive vice president and chief administration officer. In these excerpts, Mr. Chan shares his story of leaving China for Hong Kong in 1949, during a time of political instability. He and his siblings were placed in orphanages affiliated with Christian Children’s Fund during the 1950s, which were led by Dr. Verent Mills, then CCF’s overseas director. As an adult, Mr. Chan has worked to help other Chinese children. The images in this post come from his letter.   

75th ChildFund logoTaking this opportunity (the 75th anniversary of ChildFund International) on behalf of my brother, my sister and my family; I would like to thank those who contributed to Christian Children’s Fund/ChildFund, and for those who labored to raise numerous children. Without such loving deeds, they would be lost and without hope. May our Lord bless them and their families for many generations to come!

Also, I would like to mention our PaPa — the Rev. Verent Mills — and Mrs. Mills, who inspired many of us. Our lives were revived by them and many others. We wish them to rest well in our heavenly Father’s bosom. 

During the change of government in China in 1949, my father passed away, and my mother left China for Hong Kong, leaving her three children back in the country. My uncles in Hong Kong requested that my mother get us out of China, and that was when we became refugees in Hong Kong. We thank our Lord that during that time, my mother worked as a housemaid for a family from England. Knowing that we had no place to live and no chance of being educated, the mistress of the house helped to get three of us to orphanages managed by Christian Children’s Fund. Not only we were provided with shelters and food, we were also provided with full-scale educations. 

Dr. MillsWe were taught to value life, to work hard and to respect others. 

My sister’s and my brother’s stories were about the same. We were admitted into CCF orphanages at different times and at different locations. Later on, my sister and I moved to Children’s Garden.

It was the second time I rode a train since I was born. I was 9 years old, and I remember this clearly. My mother was going with me, and I knew it would be a long ride. 

My mother took me to an orphanage far away in the new territory of Hong Kong. That place was called Taipo, a small city near the border of China. After getting off the train, we had to ride a bike, and it took another hour to get to a village. There, we were greeted by several men; later on I found out that they were the staff and principal of the orphanage. 

The name of this orphanage was called Agricultural Project; translated directly, it means the place where people learn how to farm. This project had a huge Chinese-style mansion, where most of the staff and girls of all ages stayed. There were two other old houses, one about 100 yards away up the hill where many of the boys stayed, and the other about 150 yards down the hill, where I was assigned to stay. Our canteen was a three-walled shack built next to a boys’ dorm. Classrooms were scattered around the compound built with mud bricks, wood planks and iron shingle roofs. 

boys weaving

I spent four years here, and during one of the typhoons that hit Hong Kong the hardest, many of the buildings were heavily damaged. I remember my dorm’s roof was yanked away by the typhoon, and all our belongings were wet. Immediately after this disaster, we were moved to a new orphanage built in Wukaisha, named Children’s Garden. 

Children's GardenChildren’s Garden turned out to be like a dream for all of us. This place was set up like villas, built with a huge auditorium, playgrounds, modern classrooms, paved roads and a full-scale infirmary. Each villa accommodated 12 to 14 kids, and we thought of this setup as our family, supervised by a house parent. There were 66 such villas in the time when I lived there. The school systems ran a full-scale program, with lessons from morning to late afternoon, including all kinds of sports and activities. We were also provided with Christian education. Children’s Garden was connected by ferry to a university on the other side of the harbor. 

This was the place where I grew up. I spent a bit more than four years there, and I left when I turned 18.

I migrated to the USA at the age of 32 with my family and worked in several U.S. corporations. At the age of 60, I took early retirement and volunteered in a Christian organization, setting up orphanages in China. From 2003 to 2012, we set up three orphanages, nurturing about 400 children to date. I retired from this organization on August 2012 after I suffered two light heart attacks.

Chinese children

To read more about ChildFund’s 75-year history and what we’re doing today, click here.

Phanny Takes the Wheel in Zambia

By Priscilla Chama, ChildFund Zambia

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today we meet Phanny, an automotive repair supervisor in Zambia.

“I never imagined when I was growing up that one day I would work as a supervisor in one of the prestigious companies in this country. I supervise a team of men who work in automotive repair, vehicle servicing and boat repair.  I owe my success to a man that sponsored me through ChildFund, and I’m really grateful. My life has turned around for the better, and I wake up every morning with a reason for living.”

Phanny at work

Phanny at her workplace, Autoworld.

These are the words of 28-year-old Phanny, a supervisor at Autoworld, which sells an extensive range of automotive, marine and lifestyle products in Zambia.

Phanny’s parents died when she was only four years old, and none of their relatives offered to take in Phanny and her 16-year-old sister after they were orphaned. So, the sisters remained in their parents’ home, and Phanny’s sister dropped out of school and resorted to doing odd jobs so that they could survive.

“My life before ChildFund was very difficult,” Phanny explains. “My sister only made enough for us to have a meal, I had no hope of ever starting school, and most of the time I joined my sister, washing people’s clothes and cleaning their homes for food.”

Phanny’s big breakthrough came when her sister heard about the ChildFund sponsorship program (then, Christian Children’s Fund) and the girls were immediately enrolled in programs at Tiyanjane Community Association.

“Being enrolled at Tiyanjane project was the biggest relief for us,” Phanny says. “The sponsor I was assigned to was very kind. In our letters, my sister explained that I came from a child-headed household, and he became like a father to me. He did not just send us money for my school but also inspiring letters and cards. I looked forward to receiving them every month.”

With support from her sponsor, Phanny sailed through primary school and qualified for secondary school with good grades.  She completed school in 2006 and decided to study motor vehicle engineering.

As you can see, I’m the only lady here, supervising a number of men. I feel like I’m living my dream.

In 2009, she started working for Autoworld as an assistant motor vehicle technician. She rose through the ranks through her commitment and love for the job. Today, she is the supervisor and still the only female at Autoworld’s downtown branch. She and her sister live together in a nice house, and Phanny’s sister no longer has to take odd jobs.

“As you can see, I’m the only lady here, supervising a number of men,” Phanny says. “My life has changed positively, and I feel like I’m living my dream. I have dreams of meeting my sponsor to thank him and tell him in person what his support has done.”

About her future plans, Phanny explains that she wants to further her education and open a garage of her own so that she can support other children in need in her community.

Staying in School Through Sponsorship

Reporting by Ya Sainey Gaye, ChildFund The Gambia

Kumba of The Gambia

Kumba, a young woman from The Gambia.

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Kumba, 24, was sponsored and enrolled in ChildFund-supported programs in The Gambia.

My experience with ChildFund has been a great one, and I would like to add some key memories about being sponsored. I received a lot of learning materials (pencils, erasers, rulers, crayons and books) and letters from my sponsor. Sometimes I use to share her letters with my family and classmates in school. One interesting letter that I remember receiving was with a photo of my sponsor with her three children: Grace, Lara and Sara. 

I was a brilliant child performing very well in school, but my parents were so poor that they could not support my education financially. So when I got a sponsor from ChildFund, and she started paying my school fees and providing me with learning materials, that’s when I realized that I could reach my dreams in the future. I have been supported throughout my education, and without ChildFund’s support, my life would have probably ended up in the streets.

Manisha: ‘Now, I have a vision for my life’

Interview by Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today, we hear from Manisha, a 17-year-old girl from India who has been sponsored through ChildFund since 2005. 

Manisha of India

Manisha, 17, has been sponsored through ChildFund since 2005.

I belong to a poor and humble family. I am studying in 12th grade, and my younger brother is in 7th grade. My father works as a supervisor in a glass manufacturing factory in Firozabad. He used to be the sole breadwinner for our family, but now my mother also adds to our family’s earnings by working with UNICEF as a community mobilizer. Both my parents are working hard to give us a decent life. We are now a happy family, and I love my parents the most.

But a few years ago, our family was not what it is today. My father was struggling to meet our basic needs. There have been times when my mother had to sleep with an empty stomach, as there was not enough food for all of us. Just to add to our family income, we all started making bangles at home.

I never liked that work of welding the ends of bangles together with the help of a gas stove. We used to sit for hours, welding and coloring the bangles in a very unpleasant atmosphere. Though I was going to school, I had to sit with my parents in sorting or coloring the bangles soon after returning home. I was unable to give much time to my studies. Both my mother and father were having health issues because of the smoke they were exposed to during the day-long bangle work. Even I had developed chest pains and was admitted to hospital several times. But we had no other option then but continuing this unhealthy work.

But things started to change when I became associated with ChidFund. I was enrolled in the Disha Children’s Program and also got a sponsor in 2005. Not only did I start getting the benefits of being a sponsored child, but our entire family benefited. Soon, my mother joined a self-help group promoted by the organization. Slowly, we reduced the bangle-making work at home, with my mother attending parenting sessions and supporting ChildFund field staff in encouraging other women to adopt best child-care practices. 

Manisha's youth club

Manisha’s youth club in Firozabad.

In 2010, my mother was selected as a community mobilizer with UNICEF India because of the training she received through ChildFund. Then, we completely stopped bangle-making at home, and my father joined a glass factory as a supervisor. It’s purely our family’s association with ChildFund that helped bring in these changes.

As a sponsored child, I am very active in all program activities conducted in our town. Earlier, I was a member of a ChildFund-supported children’s club. Now I am an active member of a youth club. We have been participating in various training programs designed to develop our skills and leadership qualities.

I was very quiet and shy as a child, but ChildFund’s activities have truly helped me to open up and express my thoughts clearly. I am now an educated and confident girl. I am well aware of my rights as well as my responsibilities. Now, I have a vision for my life – to become a doctor and serve the deprived and marginalized communities that don’t have access to quality health service even today.

Opening a Whole World Through Communication

Reporting by ChildFund Ecuador

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today we hear from Belen, an Ecuadoran teen who is sponsored through ChildFund and also enrolled in our programs.

Belen of Ecuador

Belen, making a presentation in Ecuador.

My name is Belen, and I am 16 years old. It makes me feel very good to know that somewhere in the world there is someone who cares about me and is interested in knowing how things are in my life.

My sponsor and I are in constant communication through the letters we send and receive. I love to receive letters from my sponsor. He lives in the U.S., and despite the fact that we do not speak the same language, thanks to ChildFund, the letters are translated, which makes our communication easier. 

ChildFund has given me the chance to participate in programs such as the Youth Communicators group, which has allowed me to grow as a human being through sharing experiences with other youth my age and to learn different things such as producing TV and radio programs and writing about youth topics in a local newspaper.

I also participated in summer camps in different communities, which gave me enriching life lessons because I had the opportunity to share time with young people like me and we learned new things that help us to develop our abilities. Positive things like these have helped me to progress in my life.

Thanks to my participation in ChildFund’s projects, I have learned to communicate better with my sponsor, family and friends, and I have learned about values such as respect, honesty, solidarity, punctuality, responsibility and others. I have learned to go for and build dreams, to strive for them and look toward the future.

Ester: Passing to Others What She Is Learning

By Sagita Adesywi, ChildFund Indonesia

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today we meet Ester, a tutor at a ChildFund-supported Early Childhood Development center in Dula Luri, East Sumba, Indonesia.

Ester of Indonesia

Ester, an ECD tutor from Indonesia.

I was a sponsored child since the third grade, and ever since, my life has been with ChildFund. When I graduated from high school in 2001, the director of ChildFund’s local partner organization here asked me if I was interested in teaching young children. At first, I was confused, as I had no experience in teaching, but I was happy that I was asked and felt that it was a calling to contribute to my hometown, so I said yes! I was trained for three weeks on early childhood development (ECD) curriculum, daily activity planning, teaching and learning themes and children’s personalities.

I practiced talking in front of the mirror at home what I had learned in the trainings. Sometimes, I gathered children in my neighborhood to practice teaching them. Many of them laughed at me.

After the trainings, we went around in Dulaluri, from house to house, assessing how many young children were in the area. In the beginning, we had about 60 children. Since we didn’t have a permanent building yet, we did the activities moving from one person’s house to another’s every couple of weeks. At that time, not many people understood the importance of early childhood development. So, sometimes, children just didn’t come. We would then go visiting their house to talk with their parents.

In just three years, ChildFund built us a permanent building and we didn’t have to move around anymore. I think that sometimes children do not get their parents’ full attention at home. While in the ECD center, they can be really close with us, learning and playing together. Children also bring home what they have learned.

The training I just had is about early childhood development and disaster risk reduction. When I thought about disasters, I only thought about earthquakes, wind storms and heavy rains. Through the training, I learned about the vulnerabilities and risks around us, such as how our broken floor and roof could be really dangerous for our children in the ECD center. If the broken roof falls apart, it would be a disaster! In heavy rains, the center’s gutters would be flooded. We need to make sure our children are not playing near the gutters, since they love to play in the rain outside.

Ester with children

Ester with children from her ECD center.

This training benefits us and the children. We learn how to teach children about hazards, such as playing with a knife or fire could hurt them. Children learn how to save themselves too when disasters occur and learn how to explain who they are if they are lost or separated from their families. They can say their names, the names of their parents and where they live. I never thought these were important things, but through the training, I understand how this can help the children get back to their families.

Some of the children come from far away to the center, crossing the main road with their parents or older siblings. We are worried for them. I want the parents to also learn about the hazards of the main roads.

 If we didn’t have the ECD center, our children would fall behind other children who receive these services. When I was a kid, I didn’t go to an ECD center, as there wasn’t one back then. I grew up shy. If I saw a stranger, I would run away. Children in our ECD center are more confident. They aren’t that shy when we have visitors in our center.

ChildFund has changed my life. I only wanted to be a good person and pay forward to as many people as possible what I have gained from ChildFund.

For a Young Dominican Woman, Dreams Come True

By Gelina Fontaine, ChildFund Caribbean

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today, we meet Alexia of Dominica.

So many people have dreams and don’t pursue them, but this is not so for 20-year-old Alexia. Born and raised in a little community on the outskirts of Roseau, the capital of Dominica, the talented and ambitious young woman was sponsored through ChildFund. Today, she is the first female police officer to emerge from her impoverished neighborhood.

Alexia of Dominica

Alexia, a Dominican police officer.

She is the oldest of six children of a single mother who sells food items and walks long distances during the day, making money to send her children to good schools.

“I always tell my younger brothers and sisters to learn well at school and follow their dreams, because if I can do it, they can do it too,” Alexia says.

Alexia, who has a charming smile, has always appreciated her mother’s efforts and made the best of her education. She first entered the culinary field, working as a cook at a rotisserie restaurant, before deciding to go to school to become a police officer.  

She currently serves on the Commonwealth of Dominica Police Force and is well respected in all parts of the island country. Alexia has worked as a patrol officer, a district officer and at the headquarters doing clerical duties. The journey continues for the young officer, and she has plans to further her studies in criminal justice so she will be better equipped to “protect and serve” her country and fellow citizens.

Alexia has inspired many young people, as well as adults, who have interacted with her; she is very polite and carries out her duty diligently. Her younger siblings all look up to her as their mentor and role model.

“I will always be grateful to the people at ChildFund,” she says. “They really encouraged me and motivated me to do well in life. They helped me with my school things, uniform and books and also helped my brothers and sisters.”

In Alexia’s spare time, she spends time with her siblings, encouraging them to take their education seriously and focus on the positives in life. She also motivates the youth in the community, reminding them that it does not matter where you are from, you can achieve your goals.

In Belarus, Oleg Reaches Beyond Perceived Limits

By Elena Karpenko, ChildFund Belarus

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today, we meet Oleg of Belarus, in Eastern Europe.

Belarus’ 119,000 children with special needs, including about 30,000 with disabilities, often have problems gaining access to good education and services. They also cope with deeply ingrained social exclusion.

Oleg

Oleg, a budding photographer in Belarus.

Oleg, a teenage boy who is affected by musculoskeletal issues, often felt like he couldn’t express himself. He wanted to show others that his life has meaning, but Oleg didn’t have the tools.

But life took a turn for the better when Oleg enrolled in a course offered by ChildFund Belarus called Leadership Without Limitations, part of a USAID-funded project, Community Services to Vulnerable Groups.

ChildFund achieved or exceeded all its annual targets, including improved capacity in 170 disability-focused organizations, more services for 535 children with disabilities, training for 257 parents and family members, incorporation of inclusive approaches in nine educational settings and other successful advocacy efforts.

Through the course, Oleg has learned how to take photos, which you see below.

birds in Belarus

One of Oleg’s photos.

His mother suggested a photography exhibit for the youth in his course, and ChildFund Belarus staff members embraced the idea. More than 120 people came to the event, which focused on organizations that help people with disabilities.

trees in Belarus

A towering forest in Belarus.

“I didn’t even think that the exhibition could change my life so much,” says Oleg. “If I hadn’t taken part in the course, I would never have come to the idea of exhibiting my photos.”

After the ChildFund event, he was invited to photograph a fashion show featuring children with disabilities, and those pictures were displayed in Oleg’s school. All of a sudden, people saw beyond Oleg’s disability: Here was a person with strength, talent and capabilities.

sunset in Belarus

A flaming sunset in Belarus.

Opening New Windows to the World

By Himangi Jayasundera, ChildFund Sri Lanka

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today’s subject is Kasun, a young man who lives in Sri Lanka.

75th ChildFund logoEighteen-year-old Kasun remembers a time when he was struggling to keep his eyes open, trying to finish his schoolwork after working late at his neighborhood diner. He had only a precious few hours of sleep before waking up at 4 a.m. to prepare for the diner’s breakfast rush.

After his mother died and his father abandoned him and his two sisters, life was not easy for the Sri Lankan teen. But he continued to work hard at school and tried to earn some money by working at night.

Being sponsored through ChildFund, though, gave Kasun support and the feeling that he was not completely alone as he continued to receive assistance for his education.

“I struggled through many obstacles to sit the GCE Ordinary Level Examination,” an exam secondary-school students take in Sri Lanka, Kasun says. “When I learnt that I had not passed the exam, I was so disappointed. I thought that was the end of the road for me.”

Kasun of Sri Lanka

Kasun is now an assistant cook at a Sri Lanka beach resort.

But an opportunity to attend a Vision Camp event organized by ChildFund Sri Lanka made Kasun realize that there were other opportunities available to him and that failing his exam was not the end of the world. Gradually his disappointment turned to hope. He was drawn by the many opportunities and ideas shared at the event and became interested in taking up a career in hospitality.

“I was so happy the day ChildFund Sri Lanka offered me training in the hotel trade,” Kasun says. He enrolled in a fully paid four-month vocational training program at Swiss Lanka Hotel School. “I finally felt that my life had a purpose,” he says.

While taking the course Kasun also began working as a trainee at South Beach Resort in the beach town of Galle. Upon successfully completing the course, Kasun now works at South Beach Resort as an assistant cook.

“The guidance I received was timely and invaluable, and I feel that I have chosen a vocation that I enjoy and in which I can succeed,” he says, smiling.

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