History

75 Years, by the Numbers

Seventy-five years is a long time, and ChildFund International has touched many lives over the years. Here are some of the numbers associated with our work, both current and historical. To pin this graphic, check out our Pinterest page. Click on the graphic to make it larger.

2013ByNumbersSlideWEB

 

A Memorable Conversation in Guatemala

Children in Guatemala

The best part of working at ChildFund, for many of our staff members, is to visit children at our programs, like this one in Guatemala.

We asked Lloyd McCormick, ChildFund’s director of youth programs, to tell us his favorite story from the field. He travels many weeks out of the year to our programs around the world.

75th ChildFund logoI was in Guatemala a few years ago assisting the Americas regional office, national office and the local partner organization in conducting a community consultation in a rural village in the mountains, a very beautiful place. It was held over two days, and during one of the first sessions, I started to interact with a boy about 10 or 11 years old. I don’t speak Spanish, so he was listening to me speak English to others around me that knew English. He was very intrigued by me speaking English, as were some other kids his age who were in the same session. After a bit, he started to address me in an imitation of what he thought English sounded like. It was actually just gibberish, but I immediately responded to him as if I understood exactly what he was saying. We then just got into a rhythm of a conversation with hand gestures, tones, and laughter — as if two old friends were having a great conversation.

Lloyd McCormick

Lloyd McCormick

The kids around him were flabbergasted that he seemed to know English and that we were having this conversation. The adults around us that knew English and Spanish just let us continue our “drama” and confirming that the other kids were so impressed their friend could speak English so fluently. After some time, we both just finally burst out in full laughter, and the gig was up. From that point on during the rest of the stay in the village, whenever this boy and I would run into each other, we would start our “English” conversation where we left off the last time, just enjoying a laugh and some simple fun. The whole thing continues to remind me how we can truly connect with children in different and simple ways.

South Korea: From Aid Recipient to Donor

By Je-Hoon Lee, President, ChildFund Korea

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Korea.

75th ChildFund logoIn 1948, the seed of love and sharing was sown for Korean children who were hungry and ragged, as China’s Children Fund began operations in Korea. That seed would take root and grow to become ChildFund Korea.

At the program’s beginning, 400 children lived in three orphanages started by Verent J. Mills, who was then CCF’s overseas director and later became executive director of the renamed Christian Children’s Fund. This support expanded during and after the Korean War, which raged from 1950 to 1953.

Dr. Mills in Korea

Dr. Verent Mills at a Korean orphanage in the 1950s.

During the period of political and social chaos before and during the war, CCF levied financial and human resources to rescue Korean children. In this age of instability, CCF did not leave the frontlines of child welfare but did its work quietly. For the next 38 years, CCF supported about 100,000 Korean children, allocating approximately $1 billion. Not only did the organization help war orphans at the beginning of its work, but it also helped children who were living at home with their parents.

In 1986, the Korean branch became independent from CCF because of high economic growth in the country, allowing it to become self-sustaining. The end of CCF’s economic support carries an important historical meaning in Korea’s development of child welfare. Since 1986, ChildFund Korea has been constantly changing and progressing as a nonprofit organization, providing sponsorship, foster care and child protection, as well as other necessary services for communities and families.   

With support from international organizations and the strong will and effort of Koreans, Korea has accomplished great economic growth. In the 1990s, Koreans formed a social consensus to help children in developing countries, prompting ChildFund Korea to work globally. Starting with Cambodia, Vietnam and Sri Lanka, we have supported children and families in 21 countries around the world since 1995.

South Sudan

ChildFund Korea President Je-Hoon Lee spends time with children in South Sudan.

To return the love and help that we have received at difficult times, ChildFund Korea took a further step by opening offices in South Sudan and North Korea. ChildFund Korea provided North Korean children with hygiene kits, nutritional food and clothing and built a bakery in Pyongyang that produced 10,000 loaves of bread every day from 2005 to 2009. Also, ChildFund Korea supported health care programs to reduce disease and improve the health of children in North Korea, and we continue to provide various services when possible.

During our global expansion, ChildFund Korea’s domestic programs shifted direction as well, adapting to changes in need and the social environment. As reported cases of physical and sexual violence against children increased, ChildFund Korea adapted the Child Assault Program from the United States and trained 259,559 students, teachers and parents at 600 schools, a total of 10,151 training sessions. So far, 603 CAP teachers have been certified.  

ChildFund Korea's Youngjin Park in Senegal.

ChildFund Korea’s Youngjin Park in Senegal.

In 2011, ChildFund Korea started an advocacy campaign called Nayoung’s Wish, named for a girl who lives with a disability after a sexual assault at the age of 8. ChildFund Korea submitted about 500,000 signatures to South Korea’s congress to promote the abolishment of the statute of limitations for sex crimes against minors and the disabled, which was pending in court at the time.

Finally, the statute was changed. ChildFund Korea has built on this success and is engaged in other advocacy campaigns related to school violence, bullying and child protection.

As we reach our own 65th anniversary, ChildFund Korea allocates more than 130 billion won (US$121 million) a year to support children, and we have more than 240,000 sponsors, 1,100 staff members and 70 program offices. ChildFund Korea has helped Koreans to be active participants in assisting children living in poverty and has strengthened the motivation of Koreans to support global programs, carrying on the legacy of Christian Children’s Fund.

We are honored to be a valuable member of Korean NGOs that emerged as donors after a time of being recipients of aid.

Ghana

Jung-eun Ok of ChildFund Korea plays with children in Ghana.

A Report From the Philippines

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As part of our 75th anniversary blog series, we take a look at ChildFund’s long history with the Philippines, as captured in a 1959 letter by Dr. Verent Mills.

75th ChildFund logoChina’s Children Fund continued to grow throughout World War II, assisting 45 orphanages by November 1944, only six years after CCF was started. At the end of the war in 1945, CCF founder Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke saw that the organization’s income exceeded the known needs in China. That’s when CCF began its work in other Asian countries, including today’s focus, the Philippines.

We began sending funds to orphanages in the Philippines in 1946 (in fact, on Feb. 7, our board voted to help Filipino children), and we still support children in the Philippines, with everyday needs and when disasters strike, including Typhoon Haiyan, which claimed thousands of lives and destroyed homes and livelihoods for millions.

historic Philippines

A local garden in the Philippines, circa 1970s.

Our support for children in the Philippines has deep roots. In August 1959, Dr. Verent Mills, who was then Christian Children’s Fund overseas director, wrote to Dr. Clarke from Manila during a visit to a cottage-style orphanage, Children’s Garden:

“Mrs. Pangindian and others were at the airport and we drove by the Methodist Church to pick up Dr. Mosebrook, who returned to Manila just two weeks ago. Then on out in the rain to Children’s Garden, where the little ones sang a song of welcome. The whole place looks so neat and clean and the shrubbery and flowers are beautiful. Everything is always kept in tip-top shape here and the children appear very happy. The same cottage mothers are there and they are very proud of their children.

1977 philippines

Local women display their handcraft work, one of our Philippines projects in 1977.

The new clinic and sickbay is near completion and will be quite an asset to them, for it is difficult to segregate the ill children in the cottages. As soon as the weather changes they intend to build the other cottage.

Dr. Perez, who sends her special greetings to you both, stated that as time goes on the needs are becoming more pressing than ever, due to inflation, and the cost of living is going up constantly. … There is more unemployment than ever and market prices of everyday commodities continue to rise daily.”

 Mills continues, “The relatives of many of the children we are helping are very grateful. Likewise, the local citizens are rallying around the project and helping equally as much as we are giving.  If Voluntary Agencies only had the wherewithal to do more we could accomplish so much good and create more goodwill between other countries and our own.”

undated Philippines photo

Many children remained in poverty and were on a waiting list for our Philippines orphanages in the 1950s.

In closing, Mills writes that there are more than 200 children on the waiting list for Children’s Garden and that Dr. Perez hopes that in 1960, the orphanage could take in some of these children if they can build three more cottages.

“Also Dr. Mosebrook has asked me if he can raise locally for building an additional cottage. Would we take on the support of the children at $10.00 per month? I told him we would. I thought it would be an encouragement and an incentive. Children’s Garden in the Philippines is but one of our many Homes of which we can be justly proud.”

Q&A with Americas Regional Director Paul Bode

Interview by Gretchen Reid, Communications Specialist

We recently interviewed Americas Regional Director Paul Bode about his three years at ChildFund and what he sees in our organization’s future.

75th ChildFund logoTell us a little about yourself.

I am from the Netherlands. I am the youngest of the family of six, and all my brothers and my sister continue to live there, and my three children have moved there also.

How did you become involved in this field?

When I was in high school, I had a keen interest in development issues, and my career choices were directed at this. I studied anthropology with specialization on rural development of Latin America and a minor in development economics. During my study, I did field work in Colombia, living in a small rural village. I returned there after graduation, working on monitoring and evaluation for a rural development project. In 1989, through an advertisement in a Colombian newspaper, I came to Plan International and worked 21 years for that great organization, most of that in Latin America and a couple of years as program director at their international headquarters in the U.K. I left Plan in 2009 and then came to ChildFund.

Paul BodeWhat are the most significant changes you have seen in your time here?

We are making good progress on the changes we set out in our global strategy. Most importantly, we are making advances in building a high-quality, high-impact program. Through our partnership initiative, we are really changing our communication with our local partners [i.e., the organizations that help ChildFund implement our programs in communities] and targeting their sustainability, and we have created a financial mechanism to support our work with them. On the resource mobilization side, we have made good progress in building new income sources in the regions we are targeting, especially the corporate sector.

What is your favorite place you have visited?

I am very lucky — I get to travel a lot and experience some beautiful places. Once, I visited a project site in Ecuador in the Andes and got this really beautiful view of the snowcapped Cotopaxi volcano. I put the picture on my Facebook with the words “another day at the office…”

What is your favorite quote and why?

I think about the great legacy that Nelson Mandela has left us and especially his words, “Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity, it is an act of justice.” That guides us in our work, and the need to emphasize that it is about realizing the rights of all children.

Paul Bode in Mexico

Paul speaks at ChildFund Mexico’s 40th anniversary celebration a few months ago.

Which world issue would you would like to see solved in your lifetime?

Poverty, without doubt.

What’s your best ChildFund story or memory?

When visiting the field, you come across some amazing young people who are really having a different perspective on the issues affecting their lives. Once, I participated in a community planning exercise in Guatemala. The facilitators were young people who worked with groups of adults. One of the groups was formed by adult men, farmers, rough guys accustomed to the hard work on the field to bring in the daily income for their families, guys to be respected.

The group was facilitated by a boy, a kid really, about 13 years old, and as they discussed the priorities for their communities, the men would come up with things like building a community center, improving the road and building a water system, all very valid and important things to do. However, the little fellow spoke to them and asked them if the issues of violence and abuse against boys and girls within the family, schools and wider community were not more important to be addressed.

It was amazing to see the confidence with which he spoke and how the men really listened to him and took his views on board. That was a great example of youth participation in practice.

Ireland: Thanks to the Staff, Sponsors and Children of ChildFund

By Michael Kiely, CEO, ChildFund Ireland

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Ireland.

75th ChildFund logoSeptember 2013 marked my 10th year as chief executive officer of ChildFund Ireland. Throughout the past decade I have been lucky enough to witness immensely positive changes throughout both our own organisation and the wider ChildFund Alliance. This piece is far too short to mention them all, so I will share highlights from the past decade.

On the sponsorship front, we worked hard to streamline sponsorship funds and focus on 11 countries, as compared to 27 in 2003. This means we now can really see an impact that Irish sponsorship funds have on ChildFund work in the field. I have always been a great believer in child sponsorship. On a personal level, I am proud to have helped form the Sponsor Relations Network, which brings even greater efficiencies for the Alliance, our national offices and our sponsors.

Michael Kiely and president of Ireland

Michael Kiely (left) speaks with Ireland Pres. Michael D. Higgins, a supporter of ChildFund’s work.

In terms of grants, ChildFund Ireland received its first grant of €95,000 from Irish Aid in 2003 for a 12-month project in Kenya. In the intervening years, our relationship with Irish Aid has grown, and we now have a four-year multiannual funding agreement that focusses on early childhood development in three countries in Africa, building on the sponsorship-funded programme in the same areas.

Our first forays into the online world came in 2004 with the launch of our first website. This year, we carried out a major overhaul of the site. Visual appeal and navigability have been greatly improved through extensive use of colour, animation and a more intuitive layout, and a whole host of new features have been added. Our social media presence has progressed from limited use of a single platform (Facebook) in 2010 to daily updates on Twitter, photo-sharing on Pinterest and engaging an active community on Facebook.

Michael Kiely in Zavala, Mozambique

Michael in Mozambique with Moses.

In just the last few months, we have introduced a digital newsletter to share our favourite articles with supporters on our email database and created our first Facebook advertising campaign in aid of the ChildFund Alliance Free from Violence and Exploitation campaign. The combination of all of these efforts has meant that traffic to our website has roughly tripled, and readership of articles has multiplied from a few hundred to several thousand per article.

The economic situation in Ireland is well-publicised and has impacted ChildFund’s supporter base. However, perhaps due to the nature of child sponsorship, our cancellation rate has been well below what might have been expected. We are embracing the challenge, and I am indebted to the hard work of my team and the loyalty of our supporters during this difficult time.

Moreover, our increasing public profile means we are well placed to take advantage of the coming improvement in national economic fortunes. I, myself, have enjoyed every year of my time at ChildFund Ireland, and I look forward to many more.

Slán go foill … (good-bye for now).

Strong Friendships Begin With Sponsorship

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Henry and Judi Ferstl began sponsoring two 5-year-old Brazilian children, Jovino and Suely, through ChildFund (then Christian Children’s Fund) in 1981. Henry was a dairy farmer living 45 miles west of Madison, Wisc., where he still lives. He hadn’t been to Brazil before, but he was curious about other cultures, and helping children appealed to him and his wife.

75th ChildFund logo“They’re so grateful to have somebody care about them,” he says. As the years passed and their sponsored children aged out of the program, the Ferstls kept sponsoring; they have helped 10 children in all, and in the past decade, they took on two more sponsorships. Today, they assist four children and write letters every two months on average. The Ferstls’ son is continuing the tradition by sponsoring a child in Timor-Leste.

“I’m a big gardener,” Henry says. Just sharing ordinary details about weather or the vegetables he grows in the garden are interesting to the children. “The kids are amazed,” he notes, especially when he sends a picture of snow or, say, a moving truck in the neighborhood.

Wisconsin to Brazil

A 2004 visit to Brazil (from left): Lidiane, Henry Ferstl, Neidiane and Judi Ferstl.

Henry says that he likes sponsoring through ChildFund because he knows where his donations go, and his assistance contributes toward children’s dreams.

“One girl wrote one time, ‘When I grow up, I’m going to sponsor a child, just like you sponsored me,’ ” Henry says.

Lidiane has a special place in the Ferstls’ heart; they started sponsoring her in 1995, and she’d aged out in 2006, but they maintain contact today, often through email. Lidiane attended college and started a clothing business in Brazil. She and her husband now have a daughter, and the Ferstls had the honor of choosing her name, Emily.

“She’s just a wonderful young woman,” Henry says of Lidiane. “It’s one of the great satisfactions. I learn as much or more as the children do. And that’s probably how it should be.”

2009 in Brazil

As the years continued, the Ferstls remained in contact with Neidiane (left) and Lidiane (second from left), as well as taking on new sponsorships, including Marielly (center). In 2009, they visited Brazil a second time.

A Q&A with Virginia Vargas, Mexico National Director

Interview by Sierra Winston, ChildFund Communications Intern

In our 75-post series in honor of ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we’re talking with several of our national directors who oversee operations in the countries where we work in Africa, the Americas and Asia. Virginia Vargas, national director of ChildFund Mexico, has been with our organization for 13 years and also served as Kenya’s interim national director for two months last year.

75th ChildFund logoWhat is your favorite thing about working at ChildFund?

I work for ChildFund because I am convinced that by developing capacities in children and youth, they will be able to break the generational cycle of poverty and achieve their full potential.

I also appreciate that we reach the most vulnerable and deprived children; we try to help those children meet their potential. I like to be part of a global organization known as a child development and protection agency.

Where did you work before ChildFund?

I worked for a cerebral palsy foundation as the director for its education programs.

Virginia Vargas speaks at ChildFund Mexico's 40th anniversary.

Virginia Vargas speaks at ChildFund Mexico’s 40th anniversary.

What is the most difficult situation you have encountered in your job?

The wonderful thing about the national director job is that every day is a different one. I always have to solve different problems, to make decisions, sometimes strategic and some operational. I always have in mind the communities and children we serve.

One of the most difficult tasks is to keep the “balance” among national office, local partners, the international office and the Mexican Board of Directors. As the leader of the organization in Mexico, I have the responsibility to take everybody in the same boat and to roll in the same direction.

What successes have you had in your national office?

Looking at the potential market for sponsorship in Mexico, during 2005, we started our fundraising. Today we have almost 7,000 Mexican sponsors. We developed a five-year business plan, and our goal is to have 15,000 sponsors by 2017.

What motivates you in life?

My motivation in life is to be able to support more vulnerable children; to give them hope, to help them to reach their dreams.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I like to read and go to the gym.

Who is your role model?

Gandhi, because he made a revolution in his country with no violence.

What is a quote, saying or belief that you live by?                                               

“I want to end my life with empty hands, not because I have nothing to give, but because I have given everything.”

New Global Strategy Focuses on Children’s Rights

By Florence Provendier, Executive Director, Un Enfant par la Main 

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of the 12 ChildFund Alliance groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from France. 

75th ChildFund logoUn Enfant par la Main was founded in 1990 by ChildFund International. Today, through sponsorships, we are supporting more than 7,000 children and almost 100 projects in 16 countries. 

After 23 years of work and engagement to help children who are impoverished, 2012 saw a dramatic change in our global strategy. We interviewed hundreds of sponsors, donors, volunteers, team members and other stakeholders in our organization to arrive at our key objectives of increasing sponsorships and funding, and to accurately measure the effects of our actions to promote children’s rights.

These objectives are based on our organizational values:

  • Solidarity: Building links between France and the communities we serve to enable children and their families to be self-sufficient. To reach this goal, we work with fellow ChildFund Alliance members to meet the true needs of families and communities.
  • Responsibility: In communities we serve, we seek to build awareness of the role community members have to play and their responsibilities. At the same time, we commit to evaluating the impact of our actions and being transparent.
  • Respect: Listening to and understanding sponsors to make their involvement easier; listening to and understanding supported children so that we may better meet their needs.

    Senegalese children

    Florence Provendier spends time with children in Senegal.

The first outcome of our strategy was the launching of a communication campaign called Aider un enfant, si ça compte pour moi, imaginez comme c’est concret pour lui. (Helping a child: If this matters to me, imagine how concrete it is for him.) The campaign focuses on the relationships between children and sponsors, highlighting the concrete effects of sponsorship on children’s lives. As the campaign launched, we also increased our digital presence with a new website, newsletter and increased social network engagement to reach our supporters.

As our organization makes strategic shifts, it is always with the desire to help more and more children to grow up and thrive in the best conditions and environment possible through sponsorship.

Love for Children Reaches Beyond Frontiers

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Japan.

By Takeshi Kobayashi, Executive Director, ChildFund Japan 

75th ChildFund logoLove reaches beyond national borders, as we know. In 1948, 65 years ago, when our grandparents were in their youth, Christian Children’s Fund (then known as China’s Children Fund) began assisting children in Japan, where postwar confusion continued. The situation of child-care institutions in Japan at that time was desperately severe. Most of the institutions could not provide children with nutritious food or clothes.

From Postwar Beginnings

The 1940s was a very difficult decade for Japan. There was World War II, and at its end in 1945, the country was in ruins. Many children lost their guardians and relatives. They were literally children living in the streets. CCF brought the love of people in the United States to these destitute Japanese children. CCF demonstrated that love can reach beyond international borders and save suffering children.

The Christian Child Welfare Association was established in 1952 with management assistance from CCF. One piece in a book called “Love Beyond the Frontier” about CCWA’s history attracted my attention. It was written by the director of a child care institution taking care of war orphans after World War II:

“In September of 1949, I received a notice that my institution would soon receive the first subsidy from CCF. Under the very difficult situation which we were in, this was a blessing shower from God. All the workers together with children, remembering sponsors of U.S., offered thanks giving prayers to God. With this donation, we were able to provide children with supplemental food, additional clothes and educational materials.” 

 

CCF Japan

A historical photo depicts a child-care center run by Christian Children’s Fund in Japan.

Assistance for Japan Meaningful in Several Ways

Japan was among the first recipients of CCF’s assistance. Moreover, ChildFund Japan is the first country office that became independent from Christian Children’s Fund in 1974, and in 1975, we started assisting marginalized children in the Philippines.

In 2005, we made an important decision to disunite from the Christian Child Welfare Association to focus on international development cooperation, although CCWA continues to serve children here in Japan. At that time, we joined the ChildFund Alliance as the 12th member organization. We were able to expand our assistance to children in Sri Lanka in 2006 in collaboration with ChildFund International, and in 2010, we began assisting children in Nepal through the sponsorship program. 

Sri Lanka

Takeshi Kobayashi with children in Sri Lanka during a recent visit.

As I look back, ChildFund Japan indeed demonstrates love beyond frontiers. Love that reaches beyond national borders is essential for assisting children in need around the world.

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