In the Field

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Drawing a Line on Violence and Alcohol Abuse

Video by ChildFund Bolivia

In La Paz, Bolivia, members of the Avance Comunitario Youth Club are talking about alcohol abuse and gang violence, two serious problems in their community. In the video, one girl points to bushes where gang members hide from police lights. If you were to draw a map of your neighborhood, the way these teens did, what kinds of dangers would you draw? By creating awareness of community issues, the members of the youth club — one of several supported by ChildFund and our local partner organizations in Bolivia — are leading the way toward solutions.

The Water Story of a District in Uganda

Photos and captions by Sharon Ishimwe, ChildFund Uganda

In the Kyankwanzi District of central Uganda, clean water is now available — in some places. The pictures here show the stark differences between villages with boreholes, water tanks, tip-taps and purifiers, and those that lack these resources. ChildFund Uganda, in partnership with corporate donor Procter & Gamble and local partner organization Community Effort for Child Empowerment, has worked to provide families with access to clean water. Those affected by HIV and AIDS are in the most need. Without fresh water in or near their homes, people are at greater risk of contracting waterborne diseases and are forced to walk great distances to bring home water.

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“We Live for Our Children”: Creating Opportunity in Ethiopia

Ethiopia livelihood program

Adanech, with her 2-year-old son, Yohannes, is making a living by selling handmade textiles.

By Julien Anseau, Global Communications Manager

Adanech has never lacked ambition — just opportunity. Before ChildFund started working in her community, her family, like many others, scraped every day to make ends meet. Today, the Ethiopian mother owns a business, employs five people and is looking to grow her enterprise further. “More importantly, my children are healthy and in school,” she says.

Adanech first learned of ChildFund’s Yekokeb Berhan program a little over a year ago and signed up for training in business development and micro-enterprise. “Before, we had no money,” she says. “It was a real struggle to make just enough money to live. I had a small weaving business, and I wanted to learn how to make a success of it.” She became involved in a savings group and was able to access a small loan on favorable terms.

The PEPFAR/USAID-funded Yekokeb Berhan program has worked in Ethiopia since May 2011 to put in place a child-focused social welfare network that allows all children, including the most vulnerable, to thrive. Focusing on HIV-affected communities, Yekokeb Berhan aims to reach 500,000 highly vulnerable children throughout the country and is a collaboration among Pact, Family Health International (FHI360) and ChildFund International, along with many local partner organizations.

Adanech took out a loan of 10,000 Birr (USD $500) to get started and has not looked back since. Now, after household expenses such as rent and food, staff wages and loan repayments, Adanech and her husband, Meteke, still have 3,000 Birr (USD $150) at the end of the month that they can save or invest in the business.

“Life is so much better now,” says Meteke. “We live for our children. We can send them to school. And they are healthy.” He adds, proudly, that their 9-year-old daughter, Bizuayhue, dreams of becoming a doctor and helping the family, and that 2-year-old Yohannes is “happy running around for now.”

Adanech’s community of Zenebework is one of the poorest in Addis Ababa. Most residents are migrants from poor rural areas, attracted to Ethiopia’s rapidly growing capital city by better job prospects. The city dump is nearby, and families scavenge for food and anything they can resell. The HIV infection rate is among the highest in the country, and a high proportion of children grow up in broken homes.

Yet Adanech is upbeat: “Life is also changing in the community. Life can change if you are given the opportunity. People here have never been scared of hard work. From the moment they wake to the moment they sleep, people here are working. They just need the opportunity to work smarter.”

 Zenebework, Addis Ababa

“People here have never been scared of hard work. From the moment they wake to the moment they sleep, people here are working. They just need the opportunity to work smarter.”

At 28, Adanech is full of ambition. “I am looking to hire five more employees and buy a singeing machine to make more elaborate patterns on my fabrics, which I would then sell at a higher profit. The machine costs 10,500 Birr [USD $510], which is a lot.” For now, she sells her textiles at the local market, but she aspires to sell to merchants at Merkato, Africa’s largest open-air market, and in Bole, an upscale area in Addis Ababa.

“Sometimes, all people need is an opportunity,” says Meteke, 31. “Before, we did not have the money to grow our business. No one would give us a loan other than loan sharks, who asked for 100 percent interest. Now our loan repayment, including interest, is 450 Birr [USD $22] every month, which is manageable.”

Yekokeb Berhan’s livelihood support is important, says Abraham, a program officer for ChildFund’s local partner called Love for Children and Family Development Charitable Organization, which implements the program. “Giving families opportunities to earn a decent living is the most sustainable approach to helping them meet the needs of their children.”

He adds, “Ethiopia is seeing rapid economic growth, which is great. But with growth comes increasing inequality. I am proud of being part of this program, because I can see the changes in the lives of children who would otherwise have been left behind.”

Washing the Germs Away

In La Paz, Bolivia, children are learning how to wash their hands thoroughly, as you can see in this video from the field. On March 22, we celebrated World Water Day, which highlights water’s important role in health, sanitation, agriculture, industry and education. When clean water is hard or impossible to access — as it is for 748 million people worldwide, according to the United Nations — the most vulnerable among us, including infants and children, tend to get sick and lose time at school, become malnourished and even die from preventable diseases. Making water available in communities and showing families how to protect themselves from diseases are two of ChildFund’s most important goals. Learn more about how you can help.

A Mother’s Letter of Love

antonio 2

Antonio and his mother, who is reading a letter she wrote to him while she was pregnant.

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

A highlight of any trip to the field is the opportunity to cuddle and smile at chubby-cheeked babies. It always renews and refocuses ChildFund staff members from all over the world. There are few things more life-affirming than the innocence and love that spring forth in an infant’s gurgles and giggles.

But the sobering reality in rural Cochabamba, Bolivia, which a ChildFund team recently visited, is that both infant and maternal mortality rates are high. Many mothers never get to hold their babies in their arms, and some even lose their own lives, leaving their other children orphaned.

Yet there are signs of hope in Bolivia. In response to the high rates of infant and maternal mortality, the national government offers mothers small stipends to attend monthly prenatal appointments, screenings and checkups. They also offer incentives for giving birth in government treatment centers with trained health care providers.

ChildFund’s role in this effort is to offer prenatal appointments and tracking through our local partner organizations at zero cost to mothers. But, more than just checking the physical development of the babies and the vital statistics of the mothers, we also support the mother’s attachment to the baby within her — an emotional bond that, the doctor there explained, is as important as physical development.

Nicolas and his mother.

Nicolas and his mother.

That’s where a mother’s letter to her unborn child enters the picture, expressing her love, hopes, concerns and excitement in an early-pregnancy activity that ChildFund supports. Later, using life-sized dolls, mothers practice breastfeeding positions, diaper changing and infant massage. Often, they open up about other concerns in their lives.

During our visit, we met two babies born to mothers who had gone through ChildFund’s prenatal program. Nicolas is 4 months old, and Antonio is 18 months. Their mothers shared the letters they had written so many months earlier.

A letter to Nicolas: Dear son, I anxiously await you as my third child, even though I am afraid of the moment when I will give you life. But don’t worry. I will give you everything of me so that everything will be OK, my little love, and I will meet you with all of the same excitement as your older brothers. I only ask the almighty God that you are healthy and strong, because you are the light in our lives and we are all very happy to have you, my baby. Come and fill our home with love. More than anything, your dad will jump for joy when he sees you and has you in his arms.

A letter to Antonio: With much love for the baby that I am anxiously waiting to arrive, so I can know you in person and feel your little body. I hope it will be a great moment when I have you in my arms because I will fill you with kisses.

Learning About Life in Guatemala’s Mountains

A Guatemalan family
A Guatemalan family in their home.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer, with photos by Carlos Gonzalez, ChildFund Guatemala

Last month, ChildFund’s Board of Directors and members of our executive team traveled to Guatemala, where they spent time in the field visiting ChildFund-supported projects and sponsored children, many of whom live in tiny homes carved into the sides of steep mountains.

“It’s part of the journey, finding out how everybody lives,” said Scott Lemler, ChildFund’s vice president of information technology. “They literally are farming on the side of a mountain.”

Scott joined other members of ChildFund’s executive team this week to report back on the trip to Guatemala at our International Office in Richmond, Va., for a Lunch & Learn session. Every couple of years, the board travels to a different country to see our work firsthand. Some of the most interesting stories this time came from the group’s visits to youth projects, which promote job training, entrepreneurship and an understanding of their rights.

Jim Tuite, vice president of finance and operations/CFO, met Alfonso, who is attending school and supporting his five younger siblings by making and selling doughnuts. Alfonso, whom Jim called the “Doughnut King,” is part of the ChildFund-supported My Chance program, which helps youth — many of whom have recently graduated from high school — create business plans and build their skills to run successful enterprises.

“One girl sells handicrafts,” Jim said. “One guy was developing modern Guatemalan linens for women.” Still others have started a bakery, an organic taco stand and an imported skin cream business. Many of the families the team met rely on multiple jobs to make a livelihood, much as economists encourage investors to diversify their portfolios, Jim noted. That way, if one income stream ends, a family has a backup source of money.

Cheri Dahl, interim vice president of global philanthropy and communications, met Alex, a young man who has been sponsored since 2003. He’s also a participant in My Chance, and he sells traditional medicinal herbs, a hot commodity in the region, where it’s difficult to get health care. Along with Cheri were board members who work in marketing and lead businesses in the United States, and one asked if Alex had a printed business plan.

“He brought out a business plan that would rival anything any of us have ever done,” Cheri told the Lunch & Learn group. Aside from his herbal business, Alex teaches middle school and is getting ready to attend college.

ChildFund President & CEO Anne Goddard noted that despite the successes the group saw in Guatemala, extreme poverty still keeps many people from achieving their full potential and provides a powerful reason to emigrate, a risky proposition. In October 2014, about 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product came from immigrants sending money home, often from the United States.

“The immigrant is somebody who is admired,” Anne said; she even saw a statue honoring immigrants during the trip. Aside from financial issues, violence in the home and streets is a major reason many Guatemalans wish to leave the country, she added.

Despite such challenges, the Guatemalans who met the board members and executives often expressed pride in their communities and wished to make life better there. A mother of three children, two of whom are sponsored through ChildFund, asked Cheri to deliver a message to our U.S. audience: “Can you get more sponsors?”

Learn more about Guatemala, and consider sponsoring a child there.

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Indian Cricket Captain Makes a Pitch for Reading

India book bagsChildren in Karnataka, India, receive book bags from ChildFund filled with age-appropriate — and fun — books to encourage reading for enjoyment. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Reporting by ChildFund India

Last month, former Indian cricket team captain Anil Kumble helped launch a reading campaign with ChildFund India, presenting tote bags filled with books to children in Karnataka, a state in southwestern India. Each bag contained books appropriate for different ages, from 6 to 14, and the program aims to provide books to nearly 115,000 underserved students in 14 Indian states this year, with more to come in the next three years. ChildFund India also has plans to set up 30 community libraries throughout the country.

“If you want to get more knowledge, it is important to read books,” Kumble said. “A culture of reading picked up at this age will continue forever.” The campaign focuses on providing access to literature, creating a supportive environment and removing barriers to reading. To address poor electricity in rural areas, families will receive solar-powered lamps with chargers that can also be used for cell phones and flashlights.

By giving children the opportunity to own books other than school textbooks, it is hoped the “Books, My Friends” program will inspire them to become lifelong readers for fun and enjoyment.

ChildFund Mexico’s First Local Partner Graduation

ceremony in Oaxaca, Mexico

Our graduation ceremony at Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca in Mexico.

By Valeria Suarez Suchowitzki, ChildFund Mexico

ChildFund works with hundreds of local partner organizations around the world, providing funding and other support while they run programs that help children and families in need. Sometimes a day comes when a local partner is self-sustaining and no longer needs ChildFund’s support, which allows us to move on and continue our work in communities that need more help.

Recently, that day came to Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca, our local partner in Oaxaca, Mexico. We’ve worked in this community for 25 years and have seen great progress during that time. When we first arrived, the community water supply was rationed and untreated, 70 percent of the families didn’t have electricity, and children suffered from intestinal infections and diarrhea.

native dancers in Oaxaca

Native dancers perform at the ceremony.

Now families have fresh tap water and a sewage system. Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca started a kindergarten, following teaching methods and knowledge built in partnership with ChildFund. Of the children that were enrolled in ChildFund-supported programs, 65 percent have finished a technical or college degree. Parents have improved their incomes, and children have a safe and inviting community space where they can participate in recreational and development activities that help to develop their skills, abilities and confidence.

This was the first local partner graduation in Mexico, where ChildFund began work in 1973, so this event was even more significant than usual.

After a year of planning and preparation, we held a graduation ceremony in September at Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca, attended by community members, ChildFund Mexico staff members (including our national director and the president of our board). We celebrated the community’s accomplishments with stories and memories. It was with great pride that we noted that some of the former sponsored children were now part of the organization’s staff.

On Saturday morning, the big celebration began. It was a day full of joy and festivity. The founder of Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca opened the event followed by testimonies from a former sponsored child and a mother of another child who served on the administration and parents’ committee. This was followed by a speech from ChildFund Mexico’s national director, along with the presentation of an award in recognition of all they had done. A mariachi band played, too. Finally, children and youth groups presented some dances and theatrical pieces.

When the celebration finished, ChildFund Mexico staff began the long trip back to Mexico City. But the journey reminded us of just how far Colonias Unidas de Oaxaca had come over the last 25 years. We were bursting with satisfaction, pride and happiness as we know that there is a new future for them, a future built on a strong partnership that has prepared them to continue working to benefit their community for many years to come.

Food Friday: Brazil’s Feijoada

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Brazilian cuisine is a mixture of many cultures: Native tribes and descendants of African slaves and European immigrants.

Today, local ingredients known to the original native populations are still key to Brazilian cuisine: root vegetables such as cassava and yams, fruit such as açaí, cupuaçu, mango, papaya, guava, orange, passion fruit and pineapple. Rice and beans are popular throughout the country. Seafood and dried meats (carne de sol or carne seca) are eaten along the coast, where ChildFund’s programs in Fortaleza are located.

Feijoada, Brazil’s national dish (pronounced fay-jwah-duh), is a stew made with dried, salted and smoked meats, along with rice, leafy green vegetables and black beans. Brazilians use the black beans originating in South America and various types of pork. Although there’s no one definitive recipe for feijoada, it’s traditionally served with farofa (toasted cassava flour).

Feijoada

Brazil’s feijoada, with greens and rice. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

 

INGREDIENTS:

8 ounces of carne seca (or replace with unflavored beef jerky)

8 ounces of dried black beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup onion, chopped

1 bay leaf, crushed

½ teaspoon sea salt

8 ounces linguiça calabresa sausage (or replace with mildly spiced pork sausage)

8 ounces pork loin

1 cup white rice

1 pound chopped kale or collard greens

1 cup cassava flour

2 tablespoons butter

2 oranges, sliced thinly

DIRECTIONS:

Soak carne seca overnight. In a separate bowl, soak dried black beans. In the morning, drain and cut the meat into small chunks. Rinse and drain the beans.

Heat olive oil in a kettle. Add onion, bay leaf and sea salt. Sauté until onions are soft; then add sausage, cut into chunks. Cook for several more minutes. Add pork loin, cut into chunks, along with the carne seca, black beans and enough water to cover the stew. Bring to a boil, cover the kettle and reduce heat. Let simmer until beans are tender, adding water whenever necessary.

In the meantime, prepare rice. Sauté kale or collard greens in olive oil until tender.

Prepare the farofa by sautéing cassava flour in butter for about 5 minutes, or until the flour turns golden brown. Serve the beans over rice, with greens on the side. Garnish with orange slices and hot sauce. Sprinkle farofa over the top.

Serves 8.

In October, ChildFund’s blog has been celebrating the harvest and traditional foods of the countries where we work.On Fridays, we’ve been sharing recipes, which you can see here (or find all of the Harvest Month posts). 

Learning About the Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

This gallery contains 5 photos.

As Harvest Month comes to a close, some ChildFund employees took part in an Ethiopian tradition: the coffee ceremony. Many Ethiopians roast coffee beans and brew coffee three times over a fire, then serve it in small cups with a snack of nuts or popcorn. Our ceremony was a little less labor-intensive, using a coffee pot instead of a fire, but it was still highly social. Here are some pictures from our coffee ceremony and three more photos taken by Jake Lyell in Ethiopia.

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