In the Field

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Learning a Better Way to Fight

Photo by Jéssica Takato, ChildFund Brazil

Brazilian girl

Thirteen-year-old Camilly of Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

When I visited ChildFund’s programs in Brazil earlier this year, girls and boys at a community center in Belo Horizonte were kicking and punching — while led by a teacher. They were learning basic moves in a martial arts class, and the teacher told me something interesting: Learning this ancient pugilistic art actually keeps kids from fighting.

And interest is growing. As more children learn Muay Thai and other martial arts, the center has begun offering a class at night for adults.

Camilly, 13, is one of several girls who take Muay Thai at the community center, and she is living proof that martial arts help people of all ages become more secure and confident, and less volatile. She’s practiced Muay Thai, also known as Thai boxing, since she was 10.

“I was very nervous and fought with everybody,” Camilly says, “but now that I do martial arts and play soccer, I’m getting better. In Muay Thai, we learn to have respect for others and not hit people outside of the fight. I changed a lot. I can settle things calmly, and I’m more patient.

“Now when something happens, I drink a glass of water, calm down, and everything is fine.”

Welcome to Jinja, Uganda

Photos by Gertrude Apio

Along with videos, ChildFund staff members also chose a winning slideshow as part of our 2016 Community Video Contest. The photos come from Jinja Area Communities’ Federation (JIACOFE), which serves the Jinja, Kamuli and Mayuge districts of Uganda.

According to Meg Carter, who runs the video contest (and is our sponsorship education specialist), “Jinja is the source of the Nile River, and it’s a beautiful area located on the shores of Lake Victoria and the Nile. It’s famous for whitewater rafting and bird-watching. I’ve been there many times, as it’s on the road from Busia (where I lived) and the capital, Kampala. It’s about two hours’ drive from Kampala.”

Thank you to Gertrude Apio for taking these photographs and ChildFund Uganda’s Sharon Ishimwe for gathering information for the captions. Now, meet some of the children of Jinja!

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A 360-Degree View of an Indian Village

It often takes a full day to fly from the United States to India, counting layover time, and that brings you just to the nearest large city. To reach Dhodlamitta, a village in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, you’ll spend several more hours on the road.

This summer, a team of filmmakers, plus ChildFund staff members from India and the U.S., traveled to Dhodlamitta for an unusual purpose: to create a 360-degree video that will give viewers the experience of visiting the village. Using the 360 GoPro camera and other elaborate gear, the crew takes us to homes, a school and fields where people labor under the sun every day.

Annapoorna is our narrator. She’s a former sponsored child who is now a teacher, a wife and a mother. When she was growing up, child marriage was very common where she lives —  and it still is in nearby villages. Sponsorship and ChildFund’s programs helped Annapoorna continue her education and finish university. She also is in a happy marriage that was her choice, and her daughter is thriving.

We hope you’ll take a look at the 5-minute video — and share it. Not everyone has the opportunity to fly across continents and oceans to Dhodlamitta, but we can offer you the next-best thing: an immersive virtual reality experience. You can also read more about Annapoorna and the making of the video.

A Glorious Moment of Silliness

This video — an honorable mention in ChildFund’s 2016 Community Video Contest — comes from the Lango sub-region in northern Uganda. Watch how three children have way too much fun knocking mangoes out of trees. Soon, we’ll feature the top three videos here, but you can see more honorable mention videos filmed by children and staff members at ChildFund’s local partner organizations, giving us a peek at life in communities where we work. Have fun! Have a mango!

In Pursuit of Excellence

Brazilian girl

Maria Antônia, at the community center run by our local partner in Crato, Brazil. 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Getting ready to watch the games in Rio? I sure am. To mark this special occasion, I’ve got a few pictures from my side-trip to southern Brazil (see below, in the slideshow), which followed a wonderful visit to ChildFund’s programs in northeastern Brazil. One of my favorite moments was meeting Maria Antônia, whom we featured last year on the blog. She’s the girl who spoke about violence against children at a side-event organized by ChildFund and other international nongovernmental organizations at the United Nations headquarters in New York City in March 2015.

One of my hopes was to meet Maria Antônia in person while visiting her hometown, Crato, to find out what she had done in the year after her trip to New York. With the help of my ChildFund Brazil colleagues and our local partner staff, she and I were able to meet. She’s now about to turn 16, and as you’ll read, she’s doing well in and outside of school. No surprise there. Maria Antônia is a young woman destined for great things.

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Get on the Dance Floor!

Brazilian children dancing

Forró dancing is a long-time tradition in northeastern Brazil, where it originated. Photo by Danielle Freire, ChildFund Brazil. 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

I wrote in May about children learning how to play traditional northeastern Brazilian rhythms on drums, but another important piece of the musical tradition there is forró dancing. My colleagues and I had a magical night in Oròs City, at a community center run by ChildFund’s local partner. Girls and boys from age 5 to young adulthood sang, played music and danced while wearing brilliant costumes they sew themselves, just like the ones you see in the picture above. On our website, take a look at our video, which captures some of the performances. Below are more pictures taken by Danielle Freire, who works for ChildFund in Crato, Brazil.

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Celebrating Our Own Heroes

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As usual, July 4 is the United States’ Independence Day, but this year, it’s also Zambia’s Heroes Day, which falls on the first Monday of July. Many countries celebrate holidays dedicated to heroes, whether military, political or humanitarian. Who are your heroes? They may be people you’ve never met or someone you’re related to. Maybe you have multiple heroes.

patricia capAt ChildFund, we hear from time to time about children and adults who take stands for someone else’s rights — a person who needs protection or could use extra support as he or she fights for what is right. It can be a lonely and scary feeling to be a hero, but we are thankful for people doing what they can to improve the world, despite personal risk.

In honor of Heroes Day in Zambia, please watch Jake Lyell’s video about Patricia, who was married at age 15. She is a hero in my eyes, and so are the people who helped her escape her marriage, which had already led to abuse and the end of her formal education. Questioning long-held traditions and creating awareness of early marriage’s harmful effects are bold stands in Zambia and many other countries. We need heroes willing to speak out for the rights of girls and women.

A Family’s Just Reward

On the ChildFund website, we have a story by Martin Nanawa (our communications officer at ChildFund Philippines) about a family from Manila, the nation’s capital. These six children have had a hard life, losing their father several years ago to a heart attack. Rachel, their mother, works as a laundrywoman, and until 2014, they lived in a shack under a highway bridge. Despite all of these trials, Rachel and her four eldest children have volunteered with ChildFund’s local partner, Families and Children for Education and Development. After losing their home and having few options, a friend who works at FCED nominated Rachel’s family for an award from a corporate foundation. They won, and the prize money has helped them move to a new, stable home.

“We never expected any reward for helping other people like ourselves,” Rachel says. “We volunteer because it’s fulfilling. Poverty doesn’t mean you have nothing to give.”

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Young Faces of Sao Geraldo, Brazil

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

On the last day of my trip to northeastern Brazil, my colleagues and I (an intrepid group of five, including my translator) went to a small community called Sao Geraldo. After driving all over creation the day before — through rain and mud, past itinerant donkeys — it was a relief to have just a 15-minute drive on paved roads in the sun.

After visiting a well-stocked playroom for children ages 5 and under at a community center supported by ChildFund, we walked to nearby homes to visit sponsored and enrolled children and their families.

Sao Geraldo is a brightly colored place, with yellow, turquoise, coral and white homes lining steep streets. Nearly every home was decorated with children’s artwork and family photos. But serious problems lie beneath the cheery exterior. Neglect and abandonment of children, as well as drug abuse and prostitution, are common here, we learned from our local partner’s staff. Parents, mainly mothers, are doing the best they can, but this is a community that relies on sponsorship and ChildFund’s support of the community center, which serves children and youth.

You can read more about Sao Geraldo on our website, but I wanted to share a few photos of the children we met. Many face an uphill climb because of poverty and few job opportunities in this region, but sponsorship and other kinds of support do make a difference in their lives, offering them hope.

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