In the Field

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Our Top 5 Posts from 2016

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In Zambia, two girls help prepare a meal. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

I think most of us can agree that 2016 has been an eventful year, both here in the United States and around the world. If you are a sponsor, you can take heart in the fact that your presence and support has helped a child and his or her family. If you’ve contributed to one of ChildFund’s other campaigns, like the one in Uganda that helps reunite families torn apart by AIDS, you’ve made an important impact, too. Your generosity matters in large and small ways.

Here are this year’s most popular blog posts (judged by the number of views as of mid-December). They cover many interests and multiple continents. Thank you for your support of children and families in need.

5. On the Migrants’ Trail

Julien Anseau, our global communications manager, wrote three pieces about refugees and migrants he met while on an assessment trip through Europe in January 2016. With the chaos and death toll in Aleppo making headlines now, Julien’s story is just as relevant today as it was in February.

4. Sarah’s Doll

Jake Lyell, who shoots videos and takes photos for ChildFund all over the world, met 11-year-old Sarah while interviewing families in Uganda who are part of the USAID-funded project DOVCU, which is keeping families together and reuniting other families struggling to support their children. In Jake’s video, Sarah, whose father is disabled and was considering giving his children to an orphanage, shows us how she makes her own doll. It’s a lighthearted moment, but it also shows children’s resilience in the midst of serious circumstances.

3. The Drought in Ethiopia

Jake also spent time in Ethiopia earlier this year to document the food shortage in the region of Oromia. This post shares the words of Halko, a mother whose four children were suffering from malnutrition — particularly her 3-month-old baby son, Fentale. At the end of 2016, the situation in Ethiopia is improving, but families still need help.

2. A Child’s View of Peace 

In a report by the Asia Pacific Regional Network for Early Childhood about children’s opinions on creating peace, we learned a lot. If nothing else, we hope your connection to ChildFund produces admiration and interest for the thoughts and voices of children. In some cases, they’re wiser than their elders. ChildFund writer Rachel Ringgold found some especially interesting quotes from children in Timor-Leste. Take a look!

1. ChildFund’s Community Video Contest

This is one of my favorite new traditions: Local partner organizations and children around the world submit videos each year for our Community Video Contest. Everyone wins — the amateur videographers, the children in the videos and all the viewers. In this post, Meg Carter, sponsorship communications specialist, explains how she and her team of judges chose the winner of 2015’s contest. You can see the videos from 2016 and 2015 on YouTube.

Finally, here’s a slideshow of my favorite photos this year. Thank you to Jake Lyell and all of the ChildFund staff members and local partner staffers who took these pictures!

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This will be the last blog post for 2016 and likely my final one, as well, since I’ll be leaving ChildFund in early January. Thanks for reading, and have a super 2017. Kate

Season’s Greetings from Honduras!

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Our Honduras staff asked 13-year-old Elizandro what he likes the most about Christmas. “The joy and the fun I have with my family,” he says, “and of course the tamales on Christmas Eve!”

Best wishes from ChildFund during the holiday season, and come back Dec. 28 to see our five most popular blog posts for 2016. Some of them may surprise you!

 

Your Christmas Cards — in Ethiopia

Photos from ChildFund Ethiopia staff

In Ethiopia, sponsored children received their Christmas cards recently. Mail means a lot to them, and we encourage you to correspond with your sponsored child, which helps build a significant relationship across the oceans and continents. Here are some tips on writing letters to your child, and please enjoy these pictures of Ethiopian children showing their Christmas cards!

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Anista, Five Years Later

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By Rachel Ringgold, ChildFund Staff Writer

It’s been five years since we met Anista. She’s a sponsored child who lives in Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka, and we took a peek into her daily routine when she was 9. Some things in her life haven’t changed much since then.

Anista still brushes her teeth in the morning to get ready for the day. Her sister, Stella, still washes up with her, out in front of the same robin’s-egg-blue house. To get to school, they still walk half an hour to school, down and then back up the sides of the same misty mountains covered with tea bushes.

But a lot has changed in the last five years, too. Anista is 14 years old now, and she’s at the top of her ninth-grade class. On this visit with the family, the kids were on summer break, so they were home from school. Anista drinks tea, washes up and plays with her sisters — their favorite game is jump rope.

rs38394_dsc_0364Anista also helps her mother, Slatemary, do chores around the house. Five years ago, Slatemary wasn’t at home. In fact, she wasn’t even in the country. She worked abroad for years as a housemaid in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Jordan. But last November, after not receiving a paycheck for several months, Slatemary returned to Sri Lanka — and she says she won’t leave again. “I want to be here,” she says. “I want to be home with my children.”

Slatemary, along with Anista’s father, has worked hard to give her family all she possibly can. Five years ago, Anista and her siblings didn’t have electricity or running water in their house, but now they do. And they have a TV, which is something else Anista and her siblings enjoy on days off from school — but they’re allowed to watch only educational shows, Slatemary says.

 

 

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And Anista has gone from being one of the little sisters to being the oldest child at home, as her two older sisters have jobs hours away in Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo. Watching the siblings, it’s clear Anista takes her role seriously — she keeps a watchful eye when her younger sister, Princey, climbs a tree, and she holds brother Kabilash’s hand as they descend the steep stairs from their village.

Slatemary says that what she truly wants from ChildFund is not physical or tangible. What she wants for her daughter is “good knowledge, a good attitude and to learn to be a good human being.” And, she says, “I don’t want my daughter to be like me — a tea plucker.”

It seems that Anista’s mother’s dreams are well on their way to coming true. Five years ago, when asked what she wanted to be when she grew up, Anista said she wanted to be a teacher. And her dream has grown since then. “I want to teach dance,” she says with a quiet determination.

We can’t wait to see it.

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Friends in Deed

Photo and reporting by Himangi Jayasundere, ChildFund Sri Lanka

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“I am thankful to have Darshika, who is my very good friend,” says Sasivini, 13, of Sri Lanka (at right). “Darshika is also 13 years old and studies with me in school. When something goes wrong at school, sometimes I quarrel with my classmates. When that happens, I feel lonely and isolated. But I am thankful for having a friend like Darshika, who intervenes and settles matters peacefully.”

Stay tuned for more stories about what children are thankful for.

Learning a Better Way to Fight

Photo by Jéssica Takato, ChildFund Brazil

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Thirteen-year-old Camilly of Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

When I visited ChildFund’s programs in Brazil earlier this year, girls and boys at a community center in Belo Horizonte were kicking and punching — while led by a teacher. They were learning basic moves in a martial arts class, and the teacher told me something interesting: Learning this ancient pugilistic art actually keeps kids from fighting.

And interest is growing. As more children learn Muay Thai and other martial arts, the center has begun offering a class at night for adults.

Camilly, 13, is one of several girls who take Muay Thai at the community center, and she is living proof that martial arts help people of all ages become more secure and confident, and less volatile. She’s practiced Muay Thai, also known as Thai boxing, since she was 10.

“I was very nervous and fought with everybody,” Camilly says, “but now that I do martial arts and play soccer, I’m getting better. In Muay Thai, we learn to have respect for others and not hit people outside of the fight. I changed a lot. I can settle things calmly, and I’m more patient.

“Now when something happens, I drink a glass of water, calm down, and everything is fine.”

Welcome to Jinja, Uganda

Photos by Gertrude Apio

Along with videos, ChildFund staff members also chose a winning slideshow as part of our 2016 Community Video Contest. The photos come from Jinja Area Communities’ Federation (JIACOFE), which serves the Jinja, Kamuli and Mayuge districts of Uganda.

According to Meg Carter, who runs the video contest (and is our sponsorship education specialist), “Jinja is the source of the Nile River, and it’s a beautiful area located on the shores of Lake Victoria and the Nile. It’s famous for whitewater rafting and bird-watching. I’ve been there many times, as it’s on the road from Busia (where I lived) and the capital, Kampala. It’s about two hours’ drive from Kampala.”

Thank you to Gertrude Apio for taking these photographs and ChildFund Uganda’s Sharon Ishimwe for gathering information for the captions. Now, meet some of the children of Jinja!

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A 360-Degree View of an Indian Village

It often takes a full day to fly from the United States to India, counting layover time, and that brings you just to the nearest large city. To reach Dhodlamitta, a village in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, you’ll spend several more hours on the road.

This summer, a team of filmmakers, plus ChildFund staff members from India and the U.S., traveled to Dhodlamitta for an unusual purpose: to create a 360-degree video that will give viewers the experience of visiting the village. Using the 360 GoPro camera and other elaborate gear, the crew takes us to homes, a school and fields where people labor under the sun every day.

Annapoorna is our narrator. She’s a former sponsored child who is now a teacher, a wife and a mother. When she was growing up, child marriage was very common where she lives —  and it still is in nearby villages. Sponsorship and ChildFund’s programs helped Annapoorna continue her education and finish university. She also is in a happy marriage that was her choice, and her daughter is thriving.

We hope you’ll take a look at the 5-minute video — and share it. Not everyone has the opportunity to fly across continents and oceans to Dhodlamitta, but we can offer you the next-best thing: an immersive virtual reality experience. You can also read more about Annapoorna and the making of the video.

A Glorious Moment of Silliness

This video — an honorable mention in ChildFund’s 2016 Community Video Contest — comes from the Lango sub-region in northern Uganda. Watch how three children have way too much fun knocking mangoes out of trees. Soon, we’ll feature the top three videos here, but you can see more honorable mention videos filmed by children and staff members at ChildFund’s local partner organizations, giving us a peek at life in communities where we work. Have fun! Have a mango!

In Pursuit of Excellence

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Maria Antônia, at the community center run by our local partner in Crato, Brazil. 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Getting ready to watch the games in Rio? I sure am. To mark this special occasion, I’ve got a few pictures from my side-trip to southern Brazil (see below, in the slideshow), which followed a wonderful visit to ChildFund’s programs in northeastern Brazil. One of my favorite moments was meeting Maria Antônia, whom we featured last year on the blog. She’s the girl who spoke about violence against children at a side-event organized by ChildFund and other international nongovernmental organizations at the United Nations headquarters in New York City in March 2015.

One of my hopes was to meet Maria Antônia in person while visiting her hometown, Crato, to find out what she had done in the year after her trip to New York. With the help of my ChildFund Brazil colleagues and our local partner staff, she and I were able to meet. She’s now about to turn 16, and as you’ll read, she’s doing well in and outside of school. No surprise there. Maria Antônia is a young woman destined for great things.

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