In the Field

A Closer Look at The Gambia

Feb. 18 is the 51st anniversary of independence in The Gambia, a small nation on Africa’s west coast that mainly relies on tourism for revenue. Its borders (other than the western coast) are surrounded by the much larger nation of Senegal. ChildFund has worked here since 1984. Our current focus is on early childhood development, training teachers and improving schools, and helping youth become prepared for successful careers. Below are a few pictures of Gambian people, and you can read more about their nation at the following links:

 

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Let’s Get Cooking!

Pique Macho Bolivia

In Bolivia, Pique Macho (meat, vegetables and hard-boiled eggs over French fries) is a favorite dish.

This week on our website, we have favorite recipes from our national offices in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Guinea, Honduras, India, Uganda and the United States. We hope you’ll give them a try, and we have a few more recipes below for dishes suggested by ChildFund staff members around the world. You may need to visit a specialty or international grocery store, or order an ingredient online, but don’t let that deter you. Maybe you’ll find a new favorite dish or learn something you didn’t know about your sponsored child’s home cuisine. Post a picture on our Facebook page if you decide to cook a new dish, and happy eating!

From Bolivia: Pique Macho, as seen in the picture.

From Sri Lanka: Semolina and Coconut Rock (sweet); Deviled Potatoes

From Timor-Leste: Koto, or Red Bean Soup, is akin to a familiar Portuguese soup and Brazil’s national dish, feijoada. Portuguese is spoken in Timor-Leste and Brazil, so it’s not surprising that the same recipes would pass through their populations, too, with adjustments for taste and ingredients’ availability. Because red (or kidney) beans are more common than black beans in Timor-Leste, cooks use them in their soup, and pork or beef can replace chorizo.

From Uganda: Beef and Groundnut (Peanut) Stew; Katogo. Katogo is a dish made with tripe or sweetmeats (also known as offal) and matoke, a green and savory banana similar to a plantain. Are you feeling adventurous?

 

Try Ecuador’s Quinoa and Cheese Soup

Quinoa and Cheese Soup, garnished with a bay leaf.
Quinoa and Cheese Soup, garnished with bay leaves.

Recipe from Veronica Travez, ChildFund Ecuador

Quinoa originated in the Andean region of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. It was an important crop for the Inca Empire, known as “the mother of all grains,” and was first cultivated more than 5,000 years ago. Most people assume quinoa is a grain, but it is actually a seed that provides essential vitamins, minerals and fiber that help regulate the digestive system. It does not contain any gluten. At 8 grams a cup, it is high in protein and is considered a complete protein because it contains all 9 essential amino acids.

The United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) declared 2013 the International Year of the Quinoa to raise awareness of how this crop provides good nutrition and increases food security.

Here’s a recipe for Quinoa and Cheese Soup, plus pictures of some of the ingredients. Please enjoy, and find more recipes to try here!

INGREDIENTS

1 cup dry quinoa

1 pound potatoes, peeled and diced

½ cup green onion, finely chopped

¼ cup diced carrot

1 tablespoon annatto seed oil

4 cups water

1 cup milk

1 cup queso fresco, crumbled or broken into pieces

Salt and cumin, to taste

Parsley or cilantro, to garnish

 

DIRECTIONS

Rinse the quinoa to remove its natural coating, saponin, which can taste bitter. Let it rest in some water for 15 minutes before draining. In a pot, heat the annatto (achiote) seed oil and the onions for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Pour in the 4 cups of water and bring to a boil. Then, add quinoa and carrot, and cook until the quinoa opens or thickens. Add the potatoes and cook until they are soft. Add the milk and the cheese and cook for 3 minutes, being careful not to scald the milk. Season with salt and cumin to taste. Garnish with parsley or cilantro. Serves 4.

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A New Outlook for Alhassane

By Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Alhassane says he never had any friends until this year.

“I was born as an albino person and the only one like this in the village,” he says. “Other children rejected me. When they saw me coming, they would move away from me. What hurt me most was when they said that I would infect them if I came close to them. I was so unhappy because none of the children in the village wanted me as a friend. I was often ready to fight anyone who teased me.”

But at a Child-Centered Space for children in Guinea, 12-year-old Alhassane made new friends — many of whom had been shunned after their loved ones were infected with the deadly Ebola virus. Now these children knew the kind of loneliness Alhassane had experienced his whole life, and it taught them greater understanding and empathy. You can see pictures from the center in the slideshow below and read more of Alhassane’s story here.

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Memorable Images of 2015

These are some of 2015’s most memorable photos taken by ChildFund staff members, local partner organizations’ employees and others — most notably Jake Lyell, a Richmond, Virginia-based photographer and videographer who lived for several years in Uganda and has traveled to numerous countries, including disaster zones, to provide ChildFund with video and photo documentation of our work. We appreciate everyone’s efforts. Read about some of the year’s most memorable people and stories here.

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2015 Highlights: Fighting Ebola, Speaking Out Against Violence

Timor-Leste Children against Violence

Student participants in Timor-Leste’s Children Against Violence program take flight! 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As editor of ChildFund’s blog, I’m taking a look back at a few of the past year’s highlights that reflect the triumphs and struggles in communities where we work. See some of the year’s most memorable photos here.

As 2015 began, ChildFund staff members and local partner organizations were fully engaged in starting and running Interim Care Centers (ICCs) in Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the worst recorded outbreak of Ebola was killing thousands and leaving children orphaned and vulnerable to neglect, sickness and abuse.

ChildFund’s ICCs — staffed by survivors of Ebola, in many cases — helped children who had lost parents and other caregivers by giving them safe spaces to stay during the required 21-day quarantine period while they were observed for symptoms. The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone recently recognized ChildFund’s work to educate children and family members and protect them from the further spread of Ebola.

Facinet Bangoura

Facinet Bangoura

This year, we’ve heard many personal stories of survivors and children touched by the deadly virus. You can read many of them here, but Arthur Tokpah’s interview with Ebola survivor Facinet Bangoura was particularly memorable for me. A young man from Guinea, Facinet contracted Ebola after performing traditional burial rituals for a relative who had died from the virus. He survived, but he explained to us how misinformation led many friends to shun him after he returned to his community. Today, Facinet is on a mission to prevent a further outbreak of Ebola.

Another of ChildFund’s heroes is Flavia Lanuedoc, a longtime staff member of our local partner organization in Dominica, which was hit with massive floods in August. A couple of months later, she shared with us her personal struggle after her house had been cut off from the mainland. Read how Flavia managed to do her job amid great adversity.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

We also can’t forget Momodou Bah, the ChildFund alumnus from The Gambia who is now his nation’s youngest elected official and a 2015 Mandela Washington Fellow, an honor bestowed on young African leaders annually by the White House. Momodou is a remarkable person who is doing a lot of good in his country, despite impoverished beginnings, and now he is back in contact with his former sponsor, Debbie Gautreau.

I also want to pay tribute to all of the people — especially the youngest ones — who spoke up about violence and the importance of giving children safe schools, homes and neighborhoods so they can grow up and achieve their potential. Their numbers are great, and some spoke out in spite of personal risk. Children performing short dramas about corporal abuse in Timor-Leste, a Brazilian girl traveling thousands of miles to speak about violence at a U.N. panel, Bolivian teens drawing maps where gang activity occurs in their community, children across Africa marching against forced marriage — all are examples of amazing commitment that demand respect and attention.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

On a global level, ChildFund Alliance’s Free From Violence campaign joined the voices of many people and organizations worldwide to advocate for the United Nations’ inclusion of a measure to end violence against children in its post-2015 agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals. This effort was successful, as child protection was prominently included in several goals adopted in September. We all hope to see a great deal of progress over the next 15 years and are ready to pitch in wherever we can.

Thank you for your support during 2015, and we wish you a wonderful new year.

Rita of Guatemala: A Student and a Teacher

Guatemala guide mother

Rita is a guide mother in Guatemala’s highlands, and she is learning to lead early childhood education programs in her community.

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

Rita’s first day as a volunteer is filled with bursting nerves, excitement, confidence and fear. At one point, she candidly admits that she wants to do a good job so that those who trained her would be proud of what she learned and how she is applying it.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

She joined ChildFund recently as a guide mother in the highlands of Guatemala. Over the next several years, she will take weekly classes on diverse topics such as parenting skills, children’s learning styles, nutrition, child rights, the importance of play and many more. She will then lead weekly community-based early childhood education sessions and will be a go-to resource for other mothers in her community.

Now 21 years old, Rita got married at age 17. She explains that her father died when she was in the fourth grade, forcing her to drop out of school to work on a small farm along with her mother and six siblings. This was the only way for the family to survive. She talks about the hardships of being a mother in a part of the world where women have little opportunity for education or work.

When asked why she wanted to be a guide mother, she lights up. Her answer is simple: “A better future for my children, so that they have chances that I never had. I want them to get an education and get whatever job they want.” She goes on to explain how important it is for her to learn and be a good model for her children, saying, “I didn’t get a chance to study, so this is also my turn to learn.”

With her 1-year-old daughter, Jocelyn, wrapped to her back with a perraje, a woven shawl, Rita stands in front of 15 eager children ready to play and learn. One of them is her 4-year-old son, Sebastian. Rita leads the class of 3- to 5-year-olds through various singing and coloring exercises, which translates into language acquisition and fine motor skills development. A smile of relief spreads across Rita’s face as the class ends and she knows that this session, the first of many more to come, has been a huge success.

Through ChildFund’s guide mother program, Rita is both the student and the teacher.

Harvest Time in Ecuador

Mother and daughter in Ecuador

“I like spending my time helping my mom in the garden, especially when it is harvest time,” says 6-year-old Samira of Quito, Ecuador. Photo by Veronica Travez, ChildFund Ecuador. 

United States Children’s Survey Shows Fear, Insecurity

police in Oklahoma

Children line up to meet a police officer and check out a squad car during ChildFund’s Just Read! Reading Festival in Oklahoma. Safety and security are on many children’s minds, according to our recent poll. 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

If you were president, what is the one thing you would do to keep children safe?

We put that question to 1,188 children and youth ages 5 to 18 in ChildFund’s U.S. programs in Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. When we take a look at their answers, the common denominator is fear.

What would they do as president? Most say they would keep children away from predators, bullies and strangers. Some would make children stay inside their homes, lock down schools, put stone walls around parks.

Some would even implant tracking devices under children’s skin and in their teeth.

More than 30 percent spoke about enforcing adult supervision, setting up alarm systems and giving children safe places to go.

Another 7.5 percent recommended keeping children isolated and restricting their movements or staying with their parents at all times. And 18 percent say they would create, change or enforce laws, mostly to keep children safer. Others would shut down the Internet or use technology to track down sex offenders and predators and keep them away from children.

Children usually are reflecting the concerns — voiced or not — of the adults around them.

Part of this sense of danger and insecurity is likely based on real problems in their communities; the children polled are from disadvantaged and poor areas, with more than 20 percent of the population under the national poverty line. High dropout rates, domestic violence and substance abuse are documented issues, along with other hardships associated with poverty.

“While children responded overwhelmingly that they feel the safest at home, we know that many homes are not safe environments for children in these areas,” says program director Julia Campbell. “In previous surveys and consultations with children, they are reluctant to talk about what goes on at home and mainly focus on the problems outside the home. Perhaps compared to the other choices, home still feels the most safe to them. It’s still what kids know best and what they prefer.”

But children also are reacting to perceived problems, too. They’re scared of being targeted by sexual predators, kidnappers and other villains around every corner. Dangerous people exist, of course, but are they as omnipresent as some of the children’s answers suggest?

We need to pay attention, even when what they say seems a little off the wall. Children usually are reflecting the concerns — voiced or not — of the adults around them. Just read some of their answers to “If I were president …”

I would make a small town and keep them in there. There wouldn’t be no bullying, no people trying to get them.

I would keep children safe by putting the schoolhouse on lockdown.    

If they are ages 6-13, they should not go places without parents guarding them.

NO Guns, NO Drugs.

Ban drugs and walking home alone from school.

I would make a stone wall around the park and only kids and their parents can go in.

I would make the parks safe 24 hours.

Make sure that the parents are good; they don’t get drunk and beat their kids.

I would keep children safe by keeping ISIS away from America.

Remove every website.

I would have a soldier at as many doors as possible, make it illegal for people to use motorcycles, make animal shelters that don’t kill animals, and make it illegal to smoke or drink.

Have an online school because a lot of children get kidnapped walking home after school.

There are a few light-hearted and optimistic answers, like the children who would ban homework on Fridays and establish four-day weekends, but the vast majority of the young people polled suggest fairly extreme solutions to the question of keeping kids safe. And as we know from working in countries with political strife and other dangers, it’s hard for children to concentrate on playing, making friends, studying and reaching their potential when they’re afraid.

But if we look back to the children’s words, we can find a few answers about how to ease their fears and help them feel safer and more confident. We just need to listen:

Make parents teach children what’s right and wrong and lead them on the right path.

Have a class where all children go and talk to a teacher to tell them anything that is going on with their lives.

Listen to what they have to say and look for the best solution for their problems.

Talk to them about all their insecurities and just tell them that everything will be all right.

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