Programs

If You Can Read This, You Are Ahead of 757 Million Adults

8 yr old Urmila from India enjoying reading her fav story book.

Urmila, 8, of India, reads one of her favorite books. 

By Janella Nelson, ChildFund Education Technical Advisor

Imagine not being able to sign your own name or your child’s name. What if you couldn’t read a doctor’s instructions on your child’s medicine? This is the situation for millions of youth and adults around the world. According to the United Nations, approximately 757 million youth and adults are illiterate, with women and teenage girls making up two-thirds of this number. In the United States, 32 million adults can’t read, states a 2013 report from the U.S. Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy.

Illiteracy is linked to poor outcomes in education, health, nutrition, sanitation, economics and even peace; areas with higher rates of illiteracy have higher rates of crime and conflict. Reading is a skill that carries you throughout life. In their early years, children learn to read, but quickly there is a transition, and then they must read to learn.

In their early years, children learn to read, but quickly there is a transition, and then they must read to learn.

Children growing up in poverty face several factors that prevent them from learning to read. Parental illiteracy, of course, is a major factor because they can’t teach their children a skill they don’t have, and illiterate adults often have a smaller vocabulary than their more educated counterparts do. In some countries, schools teach reading in a language foreign to the children, who may speak a local dialect or indigenous language at home. This, too, places children at a serious disadvantage.

ChildFund’s education programs put a special emphasis on learning to read in the grades one through three, because we recognize that learning to read early is essential to get children on the right track to continue their education. In several countries in Latin America, ChildFund has established “reading corners,” giving children dedicated time and books to read. In the Philippines, ChildFund has produced local storybooks, trained teachers in reading instruction, and hosted an eight-week summer camp for children who were struggling readers at school. In Afghanistan, ChildFund is developing radio stories to encourage parents to support their children’s reading habits at home, and also providing community reading clubs.

In September, we are celebrating literacy. This month, celebrate your ability to read this article while remembering the 757 million people who still need our support. Increasing literacy for children, youth and adults around the world benefits everyone.

Tomorrow, we’ll feature children who told us about their favorite books and stories, as well as how you can help encourage literacy worldwide.

 

Richmond 2015: Welcoming the World

Photographs by Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

This week marks the arrival of the UCI Road World Championships in Richmond, Virginia, home of ChildFund’s headquarters. It’s a time of excitement for the city and for our organization, which is the elite cycling event’s Charity of Choice. As you may be aware, we are promoting our Dream Bike campaign in connection with the races, and we’ve received support from the TWENTY16 women’s professional cycling team, which pledged to donate 10 Dream Bikes. This team includes Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong, who finished fifth yesterday in the elite women’s individual time trials. Because Dream Bikes help girls achieve their life goals, we went to see these athletes from around the world chase their dreams through Richmond’s streets. Congratulations to all, and enjoy the pictures!

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Mobile Banking Promotes Financial Security in Kenya

Mobile banking, or allowing funds to be sent electronically to a “mobile wallet,” may not spring immediately to mind as a major opportunity in developing countries. But in Kenya, a mobile banking project launched last November has helped families receive financial aid more quickly, efficiently and, most important, safely. In this video produced by our corporate partner Standard Chartered Bank, which created the Straight2Bank Wallet service, a Kenyan girl named Beatrice and her family talk about how they’ve used financial support through ChildFund to purchase her school books and uniforms, and ChildFund’s global treasurer, Sassan Parandeh, discusses its advantages in terms of security and broad social and economic change.

A Solution for Much-Needed Clean Water

Video by Jake Lyell

We hope you’re having a great holiday weekend. Are you spending some time in the pool, like millions of Americans do during the Fourth of July? Take a moment and think about water a couple thousand miles away. It’s very hard to find clean, drinkable water in many developing countries, but a lot of people are working on the problem.

That’s why our corporate partner Procter & Gamble’s Children’s Safe Drinking Water program is so important. For a decade, P&G has provided their Purifier of Water packets to children in vulnerable communities around the world, including in seven countries where ChildFund works. In just a few minutes, a child has clean water to drink. Watch this video and see!

This Father’s Day, Help Families Start the Reading Habit

siblings reading in the U.S.

Three siblings read at a ChildFund-supported program in the United States. 

Reading habits usually develop within families. Mom and Dad read to a child at bedtime, or an older sibling shows a younger one how to sound out words, or Grandma pulls a book of fairy tales off the shelf. In some homes, though, there are no books. Even in the United States.

That’s why ChildFund started the Just Read! program in some of the most marginalized areas in the country: Native American reservations in Oklahoma and South Dakota, African American communities in Mississippi and Hispanic communities in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. You can learn more about the project and also donate age-appropriate books on our Amazon wish list. For Father’s Day, please consider helping a family develop the reading habit.

Share the Story and Help a Child

Children playing in an ECD center from Bolivia

 Children playing at an Early Childhood Development center in Bolivia.

ChildFund’s president and CEO, Anne Lynam Goddard, wrote about the importance of child protection for the Huffington Post this week. You can take a simple action – sharing this story via social media – and help children who are vulnerable to violence. Anne’s post is part of the Relay for Kids project, a partnership of SOS Children’s Villages, Johnson & Johnson and the Huffington Post, and each time you share her story on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and other social networks from now through April 24, Johnson & Johnson will donate $1 per action to support children worldwide who are affected by crisis. Thanks for your help.

Preparing for the Storm: Disaster Risk Reduction for 2015-2030

 

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By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

At ChildFund, we have spent many hours helping children and families cope with the aftermath of wars, disasters and other traumatic events. For the past 25 years, we’ve raised funds specifically for emergency relief and often remain in affected communities for months or even years, helping people recover financially and emotionally.

Hand in glove with disaster recovery is preparation for future emergencies, such as earthquakes, typhoons and droughts. To help communities be prepared, ChildFund supports disaster risk reduction efforts in several countries, including Indonesia and the Philippines, which are prone to destructive storms.

In March, ChildFund Australia’s international program director, Mark McPeak, led ChildFund’s delegation to the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan, an internationally significant gathering. At the end of the meeting, world leaders from 187 countries signed the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, 2015-2030, which sets seven global targets for the next 15 years. They include lowering the number of people killed or harmed by disasters; reducing economic loss, damage to infrastructure and disruption of basic services; increasing the number of countries with disaster risk reduction strategies and enhancing international cooperation to implement these goals.

McPeak notes in this piece for Devex that these targets are admirable, but right now, they are nonbinding and unfunded, which leaves them less potent than they could be. However, the door has not closed on discussions about funding and requiring governments’ participation, with opportunities ahead in the United Nations’ other conferences this year: the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in July, the global U.N. summit in September and the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris in December.

ChildFund’s chief goal at Sendai was to get other participants to understand and recognize the value of child and youth participation in disaster recovery and preparation.

“Children and young people are normally seen as helpless, passive victims of disasters,” McPeak writes. “During and after emergencies, the mainstream media, even many organizations in our own international NGO sector, portray children and young people as needing protection and rescue. Of course, children and young people do need protection. When disasters strike, they need rescue and care. But what such images fail to show is that children also have the capacity — and the right — to participate, not only in preparing for disasters but in the recovery process.”

To make his point, McPeak presented information about youth who took part in disaster risk reduction efforts in 2011 in Iloilo and Zamboanga del Norte provinces in the Philippines, spreading awareness in eight communities. A year and a half later, this work paid off when Typhoon Haiyan struck just north of the area, and local governments were more prepared than in previous storms. More people in vulnerable areas were evacuated, and Child-Centered Spaces were up and ready to help children soon after the storm passed.

You can read more about ChildFund’s disaster risk reduction programs, including our work in Indonesia, Zambia and the Philippines

Mamta’s Path to Becoming a Teacher

In this video, Mamta talks about how the Udaan scholarship available through ChildFund India has helped her overcome financial challenges to attend university to become a teacher. Her parents are illiterate, and many of her friends in her village dropped out to get married, so what she is doing is remarkable.

“I want to teach other girls to continue their educations so they’ll be independent, like me, and have a good life,” Mamta says. Video by Jake Lyell.

 

Oh, the Places We Go: A Reading Journey

 By Christine Ennulat, Content Manager

One of my favorite things about becoming a mother was the whole new world of children’s books I staggered into — with my kids tumbling into it with me when they were little and then, before long, actually leading me through it. It brought back, again and again, waves of nostalgia for all that books had meant to me in my own childhood. My children are older now, but those days are on my mind again as I learn about how ChildFund’s Just Read! program is helping hundreds of children in some of the United States’ poorest communities find the magic of reading for pleasure.

Boy with books

Kid #2, amid the household books, at 18 months.

One thing I’ve learned that I didn’t know: Reading for pleasure trumps socioeconomic status as a determinant of how well kids do in school. (The magic of reading for pleasure, indeed!)

I don’t remember much of my own early childhood experience with books. My parents came to the U.S. from Germany just a couple of years before I was born, and my main memory of any book from that time was Heinrich Hoffmann’s Der Struvvelpeter, a German collection of alarming cautionary tales that included one about a boy who refuses to cut his hair and fingernails (yikes!) and another about a boy who won’t stop sucking his thumb until one day a man wielding giant shears appears and … well.

Honestly, I couldn’t get enough of those gruesome tales. “Pleasure” probably isn’t an accurate description of what they gave me … but I’m not sure pleasure is necessarily that simple. What I can say is that I took to reading in search of similar wild thrills and imaginative flights. But even more, I was searching for myself.

As a weird, lonely kid, I recognized myself in moody Meg Murry, of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, and in Milo, the initially reluctant protagonist of Norton Juster’s The Phantom Tollbooth (after whom I named Kid #3). And always, always there was Beverly Cleary’s Ramona, and her blue-haired doll with the most beautiful name in the world, Chevrolet, and the Dawnzer, and “BOINNNG!” Oh, the courage of Ramona. I wanted to be Ramona.

Later, I would — and still do — recognize my own heart in Austrian poet Rainer Maria Rilke’s exhortation, in his Letters to a Young Poet: “Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books that are now written in a very foreign tongue. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer.”

As my own children grew, I delighted alongside them as they found their own ways down their own rabbit holes toward who they might become. My oldest fell in love with Tamora Pierce’s Alanna books, in which a girl becomes a knight in her kingdom, and her Dane books, with a heroine who converses with animals. Kid #3 couldn’t get enough of Al Perkins’ Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb, which my whole family can still shout-chant from memory to this day, and through which music grabbed hold of him for the first time. (Kid #4 now says he hated that book because, as he learned to read from it, he had to face silent Bs—“thum-BUH,” he says. He became a Calvin and Hobbes guy.)

It was magical for me to be along for this ride, vicariously experiencing their journeys through silliness, love, terror, beauty and more.

Children need these flights of the imagination, these adventures beyond their everyday circumstances. When they use their imaginations, they flex their abilities to think creatively, and that’s key to not only learning but also taking aim at what they want to accomplish in their lives.

Reading is a way toward experiencing difficult feelings in manageable ways, which prepares a child for facing difficult situations in real life. Reading is also a way toward relief of stress — which is rampant and nearly constant for families living in poverty — and a way toward a loved one’s lap.

And reading is a way toward laughter. (I am convinced that laughter has an important role in the fight against poverty.)

Years ago, my neighbor said to me, after having accomplished some crazy plumbing repair without help, “If you know how to read, you can do anything.”

I second that sentiment … and offer a tweak: If you know how to read, you can be anything.

When children read, even amid the most challenging circumstances, they really can.

You can help change a child’s life by donating to ChildFund’s Just Read! program

Riding Toward a Dream

By Himangi Jayasundere, ChildFund Sri Lanka 

Today, which is known as Black Friday in the United States, is a great opportunity to think about sharing our good fortune with children in need. Dream Bikes allow children — especially girls — to get to school safely and quickly. 

Piyumi on her Dream Bike

Piyumi rides in her Sri Lankan village.

An impatient Piyumi, waiting for her father to take her to school, used to be a regular sight. Her teacher scolded her many times for being late, which she often was: Her long trek from home to school was more than two miles each way, on foot unless she could catch a ride on her father’s bicycle. Some days she stayed home because it was too difficult to get to school.

But today, she no longer has to catch a bicycle ride with her father or walk down village paths in Mahakalugolle, Sri Lanka. Piyumi, an 11-year-old sixth-grade student, has her own bike, thanks to a ChildFund donor.

Piyumi has been in ChildFund’s sponsorship program for more than five years. Last year, she sat for Sri Lanka’s Year 5 scholarship exam and passed with high marks, which made her school proud.

So, along with the bicycle, Piyumi also received school materials, a school bag and shoes from ChildFund donors, to recognize her hard work and achievements.

“Some days, I had to wait till my father finished his work to come to school,” Piyumi says. “But now soon as I get ready, I can come to school on my own. My brother also likes my new bicycle.” Sometimes he rides with her.

“I feel better knowing that Piyumi is on a bike on the journey back home,” her mother says. “I feel that she is safer.”

 

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