Success Stories

‘When I Met Irene, I Knew …’

Reporting by ChildFund Bolivia

Snapshot of a struggling family in Bolivia: The father works on faraway farms and returns home only occasionally. The mother sells vegetables in the local market during the morning and part of the afternoon, leaving her children in the care of the eldest, who is 10. The youngest, Irene, is 5 months.

In 2006, the government of Bolivia instituted a new program, called Zero Malnutrition, with the goal of eradicating malnutrition in children under age 5. Knowing of ChildFund’s vast experience in child development, the Bolivian Ministry of Health and Sports invited ChildFund to implement a child development component through Zero Malnutrition in rural Oruro, the region where Irene’s family lives.

ChildFund’s contribution was to train “guide mothers,” volunteers who monitor and support the development of the children in their communities. ChildFund taught the guide mothers how to use our child development scale to screen children and identify specific developmental needs. They also received training in ways to work with parents to help them support their children’s development.

Maria was one of those guide mothers. She visited Irene.

Four children standing

Irene and some of her siblings.

“When I met Irene, I understood my mission,” she says.

On that first evaluation, Maria found that Irene had diarrhea, an acute respiratory infection, acute malnutrition, anemia and visible signs of emaciation, and that she was under both height and weight for her age.

Trained to recognize danger signs, Maria reported the case to the local health center, and staff from there soon performed a field visit. They provided Irene’s mother with medicine as well as an orientation on how to treat Irene.

Maria also evaluated Irene’s development and found she was not progressing in all areas as she should.

Toddler seatedWithin a year, after continued visits from Maria and with appropriate care, Irene was a healthy 18-month-old. She was still small for her age, but her weight was appropriate for her size. She also had caught up with her peers in three of five developmental areas.

Maria says the work is hard, but when she sees families in her community who have so little, she’s inspired to give her best efforts to teaching them what she’s learned about how to keep children on track and healthy.

From Violent Past to Youth Mentor

By David Hylton
Public Relations Specialist

Denzel will speak in New York on Oct. 19 as part of the United Nations' International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Denzel will speak in New York on Oct. 19 as part of the United Nations' International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

A 16-year-old Dominican boy who overcame a violent and hopeless past through a program sponsored by ChildFund International will share his transformational story at the United Nations next week. The event is part of the commemoration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty and the world body’s continuing observation of the 20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Denzel Matthew is one of five children from an impoverished family in the Caribbean nation of Dominica. His troubled life centered on his involvement with a spate of violent activities until a photography course brought him purpose and direction. He will take part in two U.N. events on Monday, Oct. 19.

The first, “Children and Families Speak Out Against Poverty,” takes place 1:15-2:30 p.m., in Conference Room 2, U.N. Secretariat Building. This commemoration is organized by the International Movement ATD Fourth World, the NGO Subcommittee for the Eradication of Poverty and the U.N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, and co-sponsored by the Missions of France and Burkina Faso to the United Nations.

The presentation will be followed by an interactive panel: “Children: The Future and the Present — Participation in Poverty Reduction and Accountability for Rights.” This event takes place at UNICEF’s Labouisse Hall, 3-5:30 p.m. The panel is organized in partnership with UNICEF by the NGO Subcommittee for the Eradication of Poverty and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, with the support of the NGO Committee on UNICEF.

About Denzel
Like so many youth in Dominica, Denzel faced a bleak future, having been involved in violent activities since a young age.

“Every day was a struggle for me to survive, as I come from a poor family and community,” he says. “I could not see my future. I had nowhere to go.”

But last year, a photography course made possible by ChildFund International donors opened an unexpected doorway for Denzel. After years of despair, he discovered how to channel his energy in artistic rather than violent ways. In addition to providing him with new skills, the photography class introduced the teenager to others with similar interests. When the program ended, Denzel wrote in his evaluation that he no longer felt like dropping out of school or hanging out with the local gang.

“For the first time in my life, I had a way to let out my emotions without being violent,” he says.

As he shapes his own future, Denzel also wants to change the lives of those following in his footsteps. He has joined a youth group of about 20 peers who are committed to making a difference in their community. Denzel’s latest effort is to create a mentoring program to assist children in his community with reading and writing skills.

The youth group also is developing a conservation program to help protect an area known as Nature Island, a popular tourist destination on Dominica.

“Today, I am a happier person and am happy to tell my story,” Denzel says. “I hope I can change the future of others who may be in situations like me.”

For more on Denzel’s story, click here. Denzel will be the featured blogger on Monday as part of our “31 in 31” blog series.

From Mississippi to L.A.: Former Miss USA Tells Her ChildFund Story

Shauntay Hinton, who was crowned Miss USA in 2002 and has appeared on TV shows such as “Heroes” and “Criminal Minds,” is a formerly sponsored child through ChildFund International. She was enrolled in the Brickfire Project in Mississippi and attended Brickfire’s after-school program until she completed high school.

This Sunday, Sept. 13, Shauntay will speak at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles as part of the celebration of our traveling toy exhibit, “The Power to Play – from Trash to Treasure.”

Today Shauntay shares her childhood memories with us:

Shauntay Hinton This week I attended a Labor Day barbecue hosted by my management company at a really elegant residence in Pacific Palisades, Calif., a community on the west side of Los Angeles. I looked around at the setting and the other “celebrities” there and felt like I was a really long way from Starkville, Miss.

In fact, when one of the other guests happened to ask me where I grew up, and I told her Mississippi, she responded “Wow! Really? How awful was that?” To which I replied “Not at all. I must have gotten lucky!”

I explained that growing up in Starkville, we had a strong sense of community. For example, when I was very little, I attended a day care center called Project Brickfire. Project Brickfire was a conduit organization for ChildFund International and operated as part day care center/part community center with programs to promote the educational and social development of children.

I went on to give her an earful about how before I even knew who Oprah Winfrey was, when I was about 5 years old, I was cast in a play at Project Brickfire as the host of a talk show who interviewed historical figures including Dr. Martin Luther King and Dr. George Washington Carver regarding their contributions to American History. And boy oh boy, did they create a monster!

Shauntay Hinton as a childI made my mind up to never know a life without being on stage in some capacity. So to make a long story short, I think I got my point across to that other guest – if I hadn’t grown up in small-town Mississippi as a ChildFund sponsored child, I might not have been standing there talking to her at some fancy shindig in lovely Pacific Palisades that afternoon.

With programs emphasizing the arts and creative expression like plays, field trips and guest speakers, even providing a pen pal from across the world, ChildFund International helped me develop self confidence in front of an audience early on. Without question, my start as a sponsored child was essential to shaping my path toward a career in broadcasting because of the encouragement, instruction and support I received from the staff of Project Brickfire.

To read more about Shauntay’s experience with ChildFund International, click here. For more on “The Power to Play,” visit www.ChildFund.org/toys. Are you a formerly sponsored children through ChildFund? If so, and you would like to tell your story, please send an e-mail to content@childfund.org with your information.

Celebrating the World’s Youth

By David Hylton,
Public Relations Specialist

International Youth Day is a day to celebrate what the next leaders of our world have accomplished. At ChildFund International we work with children throughout all stages of life – infants, children and youth – to help them bring lasting and positive change to their communities.

On this International Youth Day, we venture to Ethiopia where a group of young people have established their own studio:

Realizing a Vision

The future of the world’s news is here. Two years ago, youth in ChildFund International’s programs in Ethiopia were In the studio in Ethiopiasent to a video and photography training institution to learn about film production.

Shortly thereafter, these youth came up with the idea of establishing their own studio.

“A month before our graduation, we started discussing our future employment opportunity and the way we find it,” says 21-year-old Abraham Salasebew. “While analyzing this, we came up with the idea of establishing our own studio.”

The group of 11 youth with the same interest went to ChildFund Ethiopia staff and shared their vision for the studio. In response ChildFund showed its willingness to support the effort both technically and financially.

In April 2008, they received a legal license to establish the studio – Abogida Digital Studio – which began with one digital photo camera, one video camera and a computer. The group, though, still faced financial troubles with high rent for the studio and a loan that needed to be repaid. Working with ChildFund Alliance partner CCF Kinderhilfswerk (Germany), the group obtained a photocopy machine, a sound mixer and a tripod, among other items.

With these additions, the youth turned things around and are now making a profit. The Abogida Digital Studio offers photo and video recording and editing, film production and more.

“We would like to thank ChildFund for its commitment to support unemployed youth like us to realize our vision and change our hopelessness position,” Abraham says.

For more information about ChildFund International’s worth with youth, click here.

How a Gift Can Change Lives

By David Hylton,
Public Relations specialist

Thanks to donors stepping up and going the extra mile, our Twitter campaign has generated five gifts for deprived, excluded and vulnerable children in Africa. For every 200 followers we receive through July 27, a gift from our Gifts of Love and Hope catalog will be sent to fulfill needs in The Gambia, Zambia, Kenya and Ethiopia. Pigs in Uganda

Gifts such as chickens, goats and seeds provide a children and families food and, very possibly, a way to make money. One such example is in Uganda where ChildFund helped Milly, a single mother, start a piggery business.

When her husband died in 2003, she was unemployed and left with eight children to raise. A year after her husband’s death, a meeting was held in her Ugandan village to tell residents that ChildFund International was looking for people to train in farming. ChildFund Uganda staff visited the village soon after the meeting to register people in the program.

“We were immediately enrolled for a one-week course on gardening and farming,” Milly said. “Before the training, I used to rear a few pigs at home. I would tied them on a rope and take them to the garden to feed. Now I have given them shelter because I am equipped with knowledge on how to look after them in the right way.”

At the end of the training, ChildFund gave Milly a pair of piglets – male and female – to help her start a piggery business. Today she is an accomplished community piggery farmer, and she has started other income-generating activities such as poultry and banana farming. And because of this business, she is able to afford to send her children to school, providing them an education they otherwise would not have had. Her children also participate in the family business.

What seems likes a small gift can transform a life. As our Twitter followers grow, so will these stories. And we will share them with you as they come in. So to the already 1,000-plus followers, we thank you.

Seeds of Hope

By David Hylton,
Public Relations Specialist

Our new Web site, ChildFund.org, has many new features, including stories from formerly sponsored children, who we call alumni. Here is one of those stories:

Nearly half of Mexico’s population lives in poverty. But for almost 125,000 children and their family members, there is hope for improved living conditions. Jorge is one example of ChildFund International’s sponsorship success in Mexico2009-07 Seeds of Hope

Jorge’s family had a difficult financial situation. His father worked as a mason. To supplement the family income, his mother washed and ironed clothes for others. She learned about one of ChildFund’s local community organizations while looking for work and she quickly enrolled Jorge to become a sponsored child.

“I was 6 years old and I received support from very generous people living very far away,” Jorge remembers. “I only knew them from letters and photos but I could tell that they were concerned about my well-being. These people provided the support I needed for my education and health, as well as hope for a decent life, which is priceless.”

He was active in a variety of ChildFund programs and helped implement community activities, which developed his life skills. Today, he holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration and he is supporting his community and his own family.

“I would like to thank the person who – with no other interest than to help – reached out and supported me while I was going through a rough time in my childhood,” Jorge says.

To read more about Jorge, click here. And to read stories about more ChildFund International alumni, click here.

A Doctor to Be

By David Hylton,
Public Relations Specialist

Since he was 7 years old, Pardon of Zambia has been at the head of his class.

Pardon, now 20, is a cool and gentle looking young man of the Kafue District who dreams one day of becoming a medical doctor. 

Pardon has been accepted to the University of Zambia for a Bachelor of Science degree in the School of Natural Sciences.

Pardon has been accepted to the University of Zambia for a Bachelor of Science degree in the School of Natural Sciences.

“I want to do medicine and later specialize in pathology or neurosurgery,” he says.

Pardon, who has two younger sisters and a younger brother, remembers entering a ChildFund International sponsorship program 14 years ago.

“The program paid for all my school fees and other requirements like school shoes, uniforms, books, mosquito nets, just to mention a few,” he recalls.

To read more about Pardon and his life goals, click here to visit the new “Children” section of ChildFund International’s Web set. In addition to reading about Pardon, you’ll find more stories of children in our programs, and you can find out how you can help make a difference in the lives of deprived, excluded and vulnerable children around the world.

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