ChildFund International Blog

1 3 4 5 6 7 81

A Memorable Conversation in Guatemala

Children in Guatemala

The best part of working at ChildFund, for many of our staff members, is to visit children at our programs, like this one in Guatemala.

We asked Lloyd McCormick, ChildFund’s director of youth programs, to tell us his favorite story from the field. He travels many weeks out of the year to our programs around the world.

75th ChildFund logoI was in Guatemala a few years ago assisting the Americas regional office, national office and the local partner organization in conducting a community consultation in a rural village in the mountains, a very beautiful place. It was held over two days, and during one of the first sessions, I started to interact with a boy about 10 or 11 years old. I don’t speak Spanish, so he was listening to me speak English to others around me that knew English. He was very intrigued by me speaking English, as were some other kids his age who were in the same session. After a bit, he started to address me in an imitation of what he thought English sounded like. It was actually just gibberish, but I immediately responded to him as if I understood exactly what he was saying. We then just got into a rhythm of a conversation with hand gestures, tones, and laughter — as if two old friends were having a great conversation.

Lloyd McCormick

Lloyd McCormick

The kids around him were flabbergasted that he seemed to know English and that we were having this conversation. The adults around us that knew English and Spanish just let us continue our “drama” and confirming that the other kids were so impressed their friend could speak English so fluently. After some time, we both just finally burst out in full laughter, and the gig was up. From that point on during the rest of the stay in the village, whenever this boy and I would run into each other, we would start our “English” conversation where we left off the last time, just enjoying a laugh and some simple fun. The whole thing continues to remind me how we can truly connect with children in different and simple ways.

100 Days Later, Typhoon-Stricken Regions Still Need Help

One hundred days have passed since Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines, leaving 6,201 people dead and more than 1 million homes either damaged or destroyed. ChildFund has been on the ground since the immediate aftermath, assisting with food and water distribution, setting up Child-Centered Spaces and helping families rebuild homes and livelihoods. And yet, the people of Capiz, Leyte, Cebu and Bantayan islands still need your help as they try to get back on their feet. Consider making a donation to ChildFund’s Philippines Relief and Recovery Fund.

“It is a war against hunger and disease. It is a war against negative coping strategies families feel forced to adopt. It is a war against thirst, and it is a war against international news cycles and ambivalence,” says Isaac Evans, ChildFund’s director for global safety and security.

 100 days Capture

Flower Business Allows Ecuador Community to Bloom

Ecuador roses

Santa Rosa de Patután in Ecuador has seen great economic growth with its flower business, started with the assistance of ChildFund.

By Patricia Toquica, Americas Region Communications Manager   

Members of ChildFund-supported communities in Ecuador have been working nonstop during the last two weeks to complete orders for St. Valentine’s Day. It’s the peak season for flower production and exports, and we were lucky enough to be visiting Ecuador last week to see the business in action. This country, along with Colombia, is among the main flower exporters, and during these days the local industry in Ecuador estimates exports for about 4,000 metric tons to the United States and about 2,600 metric tons to Europe, approximately 30 percent of its yearly production. 

Twelve years ago, the community of Santa Rosa de Patután had no running water, sewage treatment, schools or health center. However, today, after many years of projects and trial-and-error experiences, this village has transformed into a community of dynamic farmers who produce mainly roses and carnations for export to the United States, Europe and Russia. 

Ecuador greenhouse

Jose Manuel Yaule shows us a greenhouse where carnations are growing.

Jose Manuel Yaule is one of the leaders behind this change. With no education other than what he calls “the university of life,” he began working for his community by building a water system with the help of ChildFund. Today, that is the local water company, a service and business totally run by the community. That was the first step toward his venture into the flower business. 

He then began researching with technicians in businesses from surrounding areas and first tried with his own greenhouse as a pilot. Realizing they could actually produce high-quality carnations and roses for exporting, he replicated this model by teaching the business to the whole community. 

“I remember back in 1994, seeing children here was very sad: very poor, hungry, no shoes, no school. I was thinking all the time about work opportunities for parents, who were mainly peasants without any hope and lots of alcohol problems,” Jose Manuel says. “Now I see children and I can’t even recognize them… sometimes I think they are from another town: so educated, so well-dressed, so happy and healthy!”  

The flower business has indeed brought color, joy and progress to this community. Jose Manuel didn’t have an education, but his five children went to university; two of them graduated, two study music at the conservatory, and one is pursuing a degree in economics.

His dream is for everyone in this community of about 400 families to be a small business owner. Continued water supply, agricultural technical support and financing are keys to making this a reality. 

flower business

A view of the business from above.

To support the farmers with credit, the community also created in 2008 their own credit union, which has 780 members and assets of about US$1 million, provides loans for land, supply and machinery. The credit union works well under the management and supervision of Monica, a former sponsored girl in the community, who, after finishing university, decided to come back and work for the development of her own village.

This community keeps dreaming and growing, just as the flowers do. Farmers continue to get training and are currently working on producing new varieties of flowers and diversifying their production. Thanks to this work and the support of buyers in the United States every Valentine’s Day, more children keep playing and learning in better schools, while their mothers and fathers continue cultivating the seeds of change and progress in their community.

South Korea: From Aid Recipient to Donor

By Je-Hoon Lee, President, ChildFund Korea

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Korea.

75th ChildFund logoIn 1948, the seed of love and sharing was sown for Korean children who were hungry and ragged, as China’s Children Fund began operations in Korea. That seed would take root and grow to become ChildFund Korea.

At the program’s beginning, 400 children lived in three orphanages started by Verent J. Mills, who was then CCF’s overseas director and later became executive director of the renamed Christian Children’s Fund. This support expanded during and after the Korean War, which raged from 1950 to 1953.

Dr. Mills in Korea

Dr. Verent Mills at a Korean orphanage in the 1950s.

During the period of political and social chaos before and during the war, CCF levied financial and human resources to rescue Korean children. In this age of instability, CCF did not leave the frontlines of child welfare but did its work quietly. For the next 38 years, CCF supported about 100,000 Korean children, allocating approximately $1 billion. Not only did the organization help war orphans at the beginning of its work, but it also helped children who were living at home with their parents.

In 1986, the Korean branch became independent from CCF because of high economic growth in the country, allowing it to become self-sustaining. The end of CCF’s economic support carries an important historical meaning in Korea’s development of child welfare. Since 1986, ChildFund Korea has been constantly changing and progressing as a nonprofit organization, providing sponsorship, foster care and child protection, as well as other necessary services for communities and families.   

With support from international organizations and the strong will and effort of Koreans, Korea has accomplished great economic growth. In the 1990s, Koreans formed a social consensus to help children in developing countries, prompting ChildFund Korea to work globally. Starting with Cambodia, Vietnam and Sri Lanka, we have supported children and families in 21 countries around the world since 1995.

South Sudan

ChildFund Korea President Je-Hoon Lee spends time with children in South Sudan.

To return the love and help that we have received at difficult times, ChildFund Korea took a further step by opening offices in South Sudan and North Korea. ChildFund Korea provided North Korean children with hygiene kits, nutritional food and clothing and built a bakery in Pyongyang that produced 10,000 loaves of bread every day from 2005 to 2009. Also, ChildFund Korea supported health care programs to reduce disease and improve the health of children in North Korea, and we continue to provide various services when possible.

During our global expansion, ChildFund Korea’s domestic programs shifted direction as well, adapting to changes in need and the social environment. As reported cases of physical and sexual violence against children increased, ChildFund Korea adapted the Child Assault Program from the United States and trained 259,559 students, teachers and parents at 600 schools, a total of 10,151 training sessions. So far, 603 CAP teachers have been certified.  

ChildFund Korea's Youngjin Park in Senegal.

ChildFund Korea’s Youngjin Park in Senegal.

In 2011, ChildFund Korea started an advocacy campaign called Nayoung’s Wish, named for a girl who lives with a disability after a sexual assault at the age of 8. ChildFund Korea submitted about 500,000 signatures to South Korea’s congress to promote the abolishment of the statute of limitations for sex crimes against minors and the disabled, which was pending in court at the time.

Finally, the statute was changed. ChildFund Korea has built on this success and is engaged in other advocacy campaigns related to school violence, bullying and child protection.

As we reach our own 65th anniversary, ChildFund Korea allocates more than 130 billion won (US$121 million) a year to support children, and we have more than 240,000 sponsors, 1,100 staff members and 70 program offices. ChildFund Korea has helped Koreans to be active participants in assisting children living in poverty and has strengthened the motivation of Koreans to support global programs, carrying on the legacy of Christian Children’s Fund.

We are honored to be a valuable member of Korean NGOs that emerged as donors after a time of being recipients of aid.

Ghana

Jung-eun Ok of ChildFund Korea plays with children in Ghana.

A Report From the Philippines

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As part of our 75th anniversary blog series, we take a look at ChildFund’s long history with the Philippines, as captured in a 1959 letter by Dr. Verent Mills.

75th ChildFund logoChina’s Children Fund continued to grow throughout World War II, assisting 45 orphanages by November 1944, only six years after CCF was started. At the end of the war in 1945, CCF founder Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke saw that the organization’s income exceeded the known needs in China. That’s when CCF began its work in other Asian countries, including today’s focus, the Philippines.

We began sending funds to orphanages in the Philippines in 1946 (in fact, on Feb. 7, our board voted to help Filipino children), and we still support children in the Philippines, with everyday needs and when disasters strike, including Typhoon Haiyan, which claimed thousands of lives and destroyed homes and livelihoods for millions.

historic Philippines

A local garden in the Philippines, circa 1970s.

Our support for children in the Philippines has deep roots. In August 1959, Dr. Verent Mills, who was then Christian Children’s Fund overseas director, wrote to Dr. Clarke from Manila during a visit to a cottage-style orphanage, Children’s Garden:

“Mrs. Pangindian and others were at the airport and we drove by the Methodist Church to pick up Dr. Mosebrook, who returned to Manila just two weeks ago. Then on out in the rain to Children’s Garden, where the little ones sang a song of welcome. The whole place looks so neat and clean and the shrubbery and flowers are beautiful. Everything is always kept in tip-top shape here and the children appear very happy. The same cottage mothers are there and they are very proud of their children.

1977 philippines

Local women display their handcraft work, one of our Philippines projects in 1977.

The new clinic and sickbay is near completion and will be quite an asset to them, for it is difficult to segregate the ill children in the cottages. As soon as the weather changes they intend to build the other cottage.

Dr. Perez, who sends her special greetings to you both, stated that as time goes on the needs are becoming more pressing than ever, due to inflation, and the cost of living is going up constantly. … There is more unemployment than ever and market prices of everyday commodities continue to rise daily.”

 Mills continues, “The relatives of many of the children we are helping are very grateful. Likewise, the local citizens are rallying around the project and helping equally as much as we are giving.  If Voluntary Agencies only had the wherewithal to do more we could accomplish so much good and create more goodwill between other countries and our own.”

undated Philippines photo

Many children remained in poverty and were on a waiting list for our Philippines orphanages in the 1950s.

In closing, Mills writes that there are more than 200 children on the waiting list for Children’s Garden and that Dr. Perez hopes that in 1960, the orphanage could take in some of these children if they can build three more cottages.

“Also Dr. Mosebrook has asked me if he can raise locally for building an additional cottage. Would we take on the support of the children at $10.00 per month? I told him we would. I thought it would be an encouragement and an incentive. Children’s Garden in the Philippines is but one of our many Homes of which we can be justly proud.”

Afghanistan: Lights for Learning On the Move

Kuchi girls in Afghanistan

Only 2 percent of girls and women in the nomadic Kuchi tribe are literate.

By ChildFund Staff

ChildFund and Nokero International, Ltd. have partnered to expand educational opportunity to 1,200 girls and 800 boys from a nomadic tribe in northern Afghanistan.

Our first effort with Nokero, in 2012, was to provide safe, inexpensive solar-powered lights to schoolchildren in Liberia. This time, we’re taking advantage of another quality of Nokero’s lights: their portability.

Kuchi tribe

Providing portable lights will help Kuchi children receive an education.

In northern Afghanistan, the nomadic Kuchi people move with the seasons, herding animals and bartering along the way. As one of Afghanistan’s most marginalized ethnic groups, they face extreme poverty and instability.

Since they settle only temporarily in rural, isolated regions, the Kuchis go months at a time without basic services like electricity and education. The literacy rate among the Kuchi men is less than 7 percent, and among women, it’s less than 2. Less than 2 percent of Kuchi girls are able to enroll in school.

This project supports a larger grant initiative to expand educational opportunities for 2,000 Kuchi children. It has two components:

625 Nokero solar-powered lamps and chargers that students can use to study, even when they’re in remote locations without electricity

peer-led study clubs that will be monitored by trained mentors and teachers so that students can continue their studies while on the move

Lights and study groups will empower children — especially girls — to sustain their learning without abandoning their nomadic way of life.

But to make this happen, we need your help to raise $8,864 by March 1 for our Fund a Project, Solar Lights and Study Clubs for Kuchi Children.

Join hands with other like-minded people and bring this project to life. And don’t forget to share the link with your family and friends.

ChildFund Listens to What Local Partners Say

By Cynthia Price, Director of Communications

ChildFund has made listening to children a hallmark of its work. But what about the local partner organizations that implement ChildFund’s programs for children?

partnership surveyLocal partners’ unique perspectives about their communities are key to ChildFund’s program design for children and families. To strengthen its relationships with these partners, ChildFund participated in a survey to identify its assets and weaknesses, with a view toward improving performance.

Along with ChildFund, 62 other international nonprofits participated in the survey, which was administered by Keystone Accountability and released as the Development Partnerships Survey 2013.

Keystone contacts local partners directly, asking them to anonymously respond to a standard questionnaire. In the survey, partners are asked to give their perceptions on various aspects of their relationships with the organizations. ChildFund received a copy of its own survey results, along with benchmarks for the other organizations that participated.

“We are releasing our private report publicly because we want our partners to know we are listening to them and that we take the findings seriously,” says Sarah Bouchie, vice president of Program Development. “We will follow up with our partners to learn more.”

ChildFund scored high for its financial support and capacity building. The organization was also highly rated for promoting participatory approaches to child development and for making an important contribution within its sector.

ChildFund scored high for its financial support and capacity building.

The survey highlighted relationships and communication as an area to improve. “We have been changing rapidly as an organization, so we can meet the needs of more children and families,” Bouchie says. “The results show that we need to pay close attention to how we communicate these changes. We want to make sure that we are attuned to local partners’ questions and concerns.”

ChildFund plans to develop joint strategies and promote its partners’ work more.  It also will repeat the survey to monitor its progress in building these important relationships.

Q&A with Americas Regional Director Paul Bode

Interview by Gretchen Reid, Communications Specialist

We recently interviewed Americas Regional Director Paul Bode about his three years at ChildFund and what he sees in our organization’s future.

75th ChildFund logoTell us a little about yourself.

I am from the Netherlands. I am the youngest of the family of six, and all my brothers and my sister continue to live there, and my three children have moved there also.

How did you become involved in this field?

When I was in high school, I had a keen interest in development issues, and my career choices were directed at this. I studied anthropology with specialization on rural development of Latin America and a minor in development economics. During my study, I did field work in Colombia, living in a small rural village. I returned there after graduation, working on monitoring and evaluation for a rural development project. In 1989, through an advertisement in a Colombian newspaper, I came to Plan International and worked 21 years for that great organization, most of that in Latin America and a couple of years as program director at their international headquarters in the U.K. I left Plan in 2009 and then came to ChildFund.

Paul BodeWhat are the most significant changes you have seen in your time here?

We are making good progress on the changes we set out in our global strategy. Most importantly, we are making advances in building a high-quality, high-impact program. Through our partnership initiative, we are really changing our communication with our local partners [i.e., the organizations that help ChildFund implement our programs in communities] and targeting their sustainability, and we have created a financial mechanism to support our work with them. On the resource mobilization side, we have made good progress in building new income sources in the regions we are targeting, especially the corporate sector.

What is your favorite place you have visited?

I am very lucky — I get to travel a lot and experience some beautiful places. Once, I visited a project site in Ecuador in the Andes and got this really beautiful view of the snowcapped Cotopaxi volcano. I put the picture on my Facebook with the words “another day at the office…”

What is your favorite quote and why?

I think about the great legacy that Nelson Mandela has left us and especially his words, “Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity, it is an act of justice.” That guides us in our work, and the need to emphasize that it is about realizing the rights of all children.

Paul Bode in Mexico

Paul speaks at ChildFund Mexico’s 40th anniversary celebration a few months ago.

Which world issue would you would like to see solved in your lifetime?

Poverty, without doubt.

What’s your best ChildFund story or memory?

When visiting the field, you come across some amazing young people who are really having a different perspective on the issues affecting their lives. Once, I participated in a community planning exercise in Guatemala. The facilitators were young people who worked with groups of adults. One of the groups was formed by adult men, farmers, rough guys accustomed to the hard work on the field to bring in the daily income for their families, guys to be respected.

The group was facilitated by a boy, a kid really, about 13 years old, and as they discussed the priorities for their communities, the men would come up with things like building a community center, improving the road and building a water system, all very valid and important things to do. However, the little fellow spoke to them and asked them if the issues of violence and abuse against boys and girls within the family, schools and wider community were not more important to be addressed.

It was amazing to see the confidence with which he spoke and how the men really listened to him and took his views on board. That was a great example of youth participation in practice.

Ireland: Thanks to the Staff, Sponsors and Children of ChildFund

By Michael Kiely, CEO, ChildFund Ireland

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Ireland.

75th ChildFund logoSeptember 2013 marked my 10th year as chief executive officer of ChildFund Ireland. Throughout the past decade I have been lucky enough to witness immensely positive changes throughout both our own organisation and the wider ChildFund Alliance. This piece is far too short to mention them all, so I will share highlights from the past decade.

On the sponsorship front, we worked hard to streamline sponsorship funds and focus on 11 countries, as compared to 27 in 2003. This means we now can really see an impact that Irish sponsorship funds have on ChildFund work in the field. I have always been a great believer in child sponsorship. On a personal level, I am proud to have helped form the Sponsor Relations Network, which brings even greater efficiencies for the Alliance, our national offices and our sponsors.

Michael Kiely and president of Ireland

Michael Kiely (left) speaks with Ireland Pres. Michael D. Higgins, a supporter of ChildFund’s work.

In terms of grants, ChildFund Ireland received its first grant of €95,000 from Irish Aid in 2003 for a 12-month project in Kenya. In the intervening years, our relationship with Irish Aid has grown, and we now have a four-year multiannual funding agreement that focusses on early childhood development in three countries in Africa, building on the sponsorship-funded programme in the same areas.

Our first forays into the online world came in 2004 with the launch of our first website. This year, we carried out a major overhaul of the site. Visual appeal and navigability have been greatly improved through extensive use of colour, animation and a more intuitive layout, and a whole host of new features have been added. Our social media presence has progressed from limited use of a single platform (Facebook) in 2010 to daily updates on Twitter, photo-sharing on Pinterest and engaging an active community on Facebook.

Michael Kiely in Zavala, Mozambique

Michael in Mozambique with Moses.

In just the last few months, we have introduced a digital newsletter to share our favourite articles with supporters on our email database and created our first Facebook advertising campaign in aid of the ChildFund Alliance Free from Violence and Exploitation campaign. The combination of all of these efforts has meant that traffic to our website has roughly tripled, and readership of articles has multiplied from a few hundred to several thousand per article.

The economic situation in Ireland is well-publicised and has impacted ChildFund’s supporter base. However, perhaps due to the nature of child sponsorship, our cancellation rate has been well below what might have been expected. We are embracing the challenge, and I am indebted to the hard work of my team and the loyalty of our supporters during this difficult time.

Moreover, our increasing public profile means we are well placed to take advantage of the coming improvement in national economic fortunes. I, myself, have enjoyed every year of my time at ChildFund Ireland, and I look forward to many more.

Slán go foill … (good-bye for now).

1 3 4 5 6 7 81

The Mama Effect

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 755 other subscribers

ChildFund

Follow me on Twitter