ChildFund International Blog

Richmond 2015: Welcoming the World

Photographs by Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

This week marks the arrival of the UCI Road World Championships in Richmond, Virginia, home of ChildFund’s headquarters. It’s a time of excitement for the city and for our organization, which is the elite cycling event’s Charity of Choice. As you may be aware, we are promoting our Dream Bike campaign in connection with the races, and we’ve received support from the TWENTY16 women’s professional cycling team, which pledged to donate 10 Dream Bikes. This team includes Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong, who finished fifth yesterday in the elite women’s individual time trials. Because Dream Bikes help girls achieve their life goals, we went to see these athletes from around the world chase their dreams through Richmond’s streets. Congratulations to all, and enjoy the pictures!

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Mobile Banking Promotes Financial Security in Kenya

Mobile banking, or allowing funds to be sent electronically to a “mobile wallet,” may not spring immediately to mind as a major opportunity in developing countries. But in Kenya, a mobile banking project launched last November has helped families receive financial aid more quickly, efficiently and, most important, safely. In this video produced by our corporate partner Standard Chartered Bank, which created the Straight2Bank Wallet service, a Kenyan girl named Beatrice and her family talk about how they’ve used financial support through ChildFund to purchase her school books and uniforms, and ChildFund’s global treasurer, Sassan Parandeh, discusses its advantages in terms of security and broad social and economic change.

Lansana and His Dream Bike

Dream bike_3

Lansana (left, in yellow shirt) and his friends with their new bicycles. 

By Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

Most of the children ChildFund works with in Guinea’s Dabola prefecture used to walk 2 1/2 miles or more to get to school. Many dreamed of bicycles to get them there quickly and safely.

One day, the dream came true, when 8-year-old Lansana and his friends received bicycles from ChildFund. “We will no longer be late for school!” they shouted with joy.

“Before, I used to walk to school with my little brother,” Lansana said. “We often got to school late, because I needed to go slowly with him along the road. Most of my friends whose parents bought bicycles for them could get to school sooner than we did. But today, I am so grateful to the donors of this bicycle. Though we are on school vacation, the bicycle will be a great help for my brother and me when school reopens. We will no longer get to school late.”

Lansana also talked about how much the bicycle was already helping his family: “Even now, the bicycle is a help to me and my family because I use it to get to the football field to play with my friends and also do little chores for my parents. Thanks again to the donors and to ChildFund.”

You can help make a difference in a child’s life by donating a Dream Bike

Meet Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme, 6, is from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and likes corresponding with his sponsor.

By Agueda Barreto, ChildFund Brasil

Six-year-old Guilherme was born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a neighborhood that has seen significant criminal activity. He’s a lively and curious child, full of energy, and his life has improved a great deal since his mother enrolled him in ChildFund’s programs.

Guilherme and his younger brother, 4-year-old Gabriel, participate in activities at ChildFund’s local partner GEDAM. He and his brother no longer have to stay at home as much or at someone else’s house while their mother works. They can be children! Today, Guilherme’s writing a letter to his ChildFund sponsor with his mother, Fabiana, helping him.

“I’m writing the second letter to my sponsor, and my mom is helping me, so the letter can be beautiful,” Guilherme says. “I love to write to him, and I’m happy when I get news as well. Here at the organization, what I like to do most is judo, play soccer, jump rope, read books, dance, paint and color.”

Guilherme writing a letter

He and his mother, Fabiana, write a letter to Guilherme’s sponsor. 

Happy 2008! (Yes, really.)

Today is the start of the new year in Ethiopia — 2008! It’s based on the Coptic calendar, and traditionally, girls don new dresses, carry flowers and sing songs, just as they’re doing here in a video from Alemtsehay Zergaw of ChildFund Ethiopia. Watch and enjoy!

Fulfilling Dreams in Africa

Fanta with her bike

Fanta and her new bicycle.

Reporting and Photos from ChildFund staff in Mozambique, Sierra Leone and The Gambia

Although ChildFund’s Dream Bikes campaign began with a focus on India and Sri Lanka, children in several African countries also have expressed their desire for bicycles so they, too, can travel safely to and from school. Fanta, a 9-year-old girl from northern Sierra Leone, received a bike recently after her ChildFund sponsor sent the funds necessary for her family to purchase one.

“I have been dreaming about this every day, especially when I see my friends going to school on their bicycles,” said Fanta on the day she received her bicycle. “Now I can go to school early and return home early. I will now have time to study at home because I am not exhausted.” In the slideshow below are children from Mozambique and The Gambia with their bikes. More girls in Africa need bicycles so they can get to school efficiently and avoid danger along the roads. Learn more about Dream Bikes and how you can make a difference in a girl’s life.

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Children Advocating for Safe Schools

children against violence

Members of Timor-Leste’s Children Against Violence group pose for a photo during their journey from their hometown, Maliana, to neighboring district Suai for a national child rights forum.

By Janella Nelson, ChildFund Education Technical Advisor

This blog post was originally published by the Global Campaign for Education’s United States chapter.

As many children return to school this month, it is an exciting time for parents and students. There is an assumption by many that school is a safe place, but there are children around the world, including in the United States, who will be returning to school and wondering if their school is really safe.

Children have the right to learn in a physically and emotionally safe environment that is conducive to learning. When we think about “safe environments,” there are several things we consider, but usually physical safety is at the top of our minds. Globally, children are exposed to several forms of violence in the classroom, on school grounds and on the way to or from school. They include corporal punishment, bullying, sexual gender-based violence, gangs and political unrest.

Children in Timor-Leste rehearse a skit about corporal punishment.

Members of Timor-Leste’s Children Against Violence group rehearse a skit about corporal punishment.

These forms of violence, which can be physical or psychological, can prevent children from learning and staying in school. Evidence shows that corporal punishment by educators increases dropout rates and perpetuates a cycle of violence. Bullying is linked to poor mental and physical health, school absenteeism, lower test scores and higher crime rates (bullies are four times more likely to engage in serious crime, according to a study in 28 countries published by the American Psychological Association in 2013). Sexual violence based on gender has a detrimental effect on girls’ attendance and completion of basic education, which contributes to the large gender gap in secondary school. Gang-related and political violence prevents children from even attending school, causing schools to close and teachers to resign.

ChildFund International and our partners in the ChildFund Alliance are committed to contributing to a world where every child is free from violence and exploitation. We support children in exercising their rights and work to create environments where children can not only participate as advocates against violence but also lead efforts.

In Timor-Leste, ChildFund’s Children Against Violence program has prioritized the push for a legal framework prohibiting violence against children in schools, as well as community-based awareness activities. Students have created Child Advocacy Groups, which have conducted research on violence against children; group members have used this research to advocate for a national policy forbidding corporal punishment in school. A cadre of young advocates has grown out of the groups, and they promote the protection of children’s rights, as well as the education of teachers and parents about positive discipline practices.

Students, parents and teachers need to work together to tackle all types of violence in schools, and one essential step is to provide support to children so they can raise their voices about this issue and make schools truly safe.

Two Girls from Indonesia, and How Bikes Changed Their Days

Dream Bike Jakarta

Nurul (in green skirt) and Selfila (wearing navy blue tie) on the day they received their bikes.

Interviews and Photography by Sagita Adesywi, ChildFund Indonesia

Last week, we heard from Aisyah, a 12-year-old girl from Jakarta, Indonesia, who had just received a Dream Bike from ChildFund. Today, Nurul and Selfila, two more girls from Jakarta’s slums, talk about their lives before and after receiving bikes. You can help girls achieve full educations and escape everyday hazards by making a donation to ChildFund’s Dream Bike campaign.

Nurul

Nurul is quite a shy one. She is 12 years old and in third grade, behind where she should be in school. Because she has dyslexia, Nurul finds it difficult to read and retain information. She has repeated grades several times and even moved to another school. Her mother always accompanies her to school to protect Nurul from bullying. Nurul doesn’t talk much, and looks to her mother to answer questions.

Nurul.

Nurul.

“She always wanted to have a bicycle,” Nurul’s mother explains. “She saw her friends with bikes. One time, she wanted to ride a bike and tried to borrow it from a friend, but the friend wouldn’t let her. Nurul asked, ‘Mama, when can I get a bike?’ ”

But the family didn’t have the money to buy a bicycle.

“We need to pay about US$8 per month for the school fee, which I haven’t paid for four months. I don’t know how much a bicycle costs, but I guess it is about US$100. We can’t afford it. It is way too much for us. I only work as a daily laborer, and my husband works as a security guard,” Nurul’s mother said. “What we earn is only enough for food and to pay the electricity bill. Before she received the Dream Bike, it took her about 45 minutes to walk to school. She often arrived late, and it was quite tiring for her. I am really happy now that Nurul has been given the bicycle from ChildFund. Praise the Lord!”

“I ride the bike to school,” Nurul says shyly. “I am really happy I don’t have to walk to school anymore! It is much faster for me to get to school than walking. I want to be a doctor when I grow up. I am going to be a dentist!”

Selfila

Selfila, at 14 years old, is in her second year of junior high school. She is the oldest of three children. Her father supports them with daily construction work. Her mother is a housewife.

“I used to walk to school for about half an hour each way, starting early — at 5:30 a.m.,” she explains. “I walked by myself, as my friends don’t live in the same neighborhood. When I was younger, I was a little scared to walk on the big roads, because there were many cars. Sometimes I arrived at school late because I had to wait for the rain to end. It was quite hard when I returned home too, because the sun was so hot, and I carried so many books. So sometimes I felt too tired to help my mom at home. But now I have the bike, and I get home faster, so I can help her more. I also have more time to do my homework!”

Selfila and her younger brother.

Selfila and her younger brother. 

 

Training Zambian Youth to Be Nurses

The MasterCard FoundationThe MasterCard Foundation-200dpi recently produced a video about our e-learning program to train nurses in Zambia. The $7.6 million program, launched last June as a collaboration between ChildFund, The MasterCard Foundation and the African Medical and Research Foundation, is helping young men and women find employment in a country where there are few job opportunities, while also addressing a critical shortage of health care workers. Zambia has only one nurse for every 1,500 people, far below the World Health Organization’s recommended nurse-population ratio of 1 to 700. The Zambia Nurse and Life Skills Training program is expected to train 6,000 students to be nurses and midwives. Please enjoy the video.

In Jakarta’s Slums, Children Fold Up Their Dream Bikes

bikes in Jakarta

Children in Jakarta, Indonesia, receive their fold-up bicycles and helmets from ChildFund. Aisyah is in the green T-shirt.

Reporting and Photography by Sagita Adesywi, ChildFund Indonesia

Many children who benefit from ChildFund’s Dream Bikes program are in isolated communities and face long journeys across rough rural terrain. It’s a little different in south and east Jakarta, the huge capital city of Indonesia. Children there live in dense, crowded slums, and to get to school, they have to walk or take the public bus or a motorbike, a big daily expense for families living in poverty.

Because their homes also are small, 125 children in Jakarta’s slums received foldable bicycles from ChildFund’s local partner organization, Perkumpulan Marga Sejahtera, which hosts after-school activities.

“When they fold the bike, it won’t take up as much space,” explains the organization’s director, Liest Pranowo. “These children walk every day to school, and also when they join some activities out of school. Having a bike hopefully will help them to get to school easier, get in on time and be more active as well in out-of-school activities. It would save their parents some costs too. Usually, it takes about US$2 for a rental motorbike. It is just too much for them. As children are very active, we also provided them with helmets. If they fell, their heads would be protected.”

Aisyah, 12, with her bike.

Aisyah, 12, with her bike.

Let’s meet Aisyah, a 12-year-old girl who likes watching the news and hopes to be a doctor one day. She received a bike and helmet, and it’s making a difference already. These are her words:

I walked to school and back every day with my younger brother. He’s in the second grade. I leave home around 5 a.m. and get to school by 5:30 a.m. Often I came late to school, especially on Mondays and Fridays. On Mondays, we have a morning ceremony where we need to be ready a bit early, and on Friday we have group study and exercise that I need to come early for too. On those days, often I came late.

Once, there were other kids in the street from another school who made fun of me. They would say something bad, like “Oh, you are a hobo! Even your school is the school for hobos!” They were boys, four of them. I would tell them to please not to say something like that, as they wouldn’t want other people to say something bad in return, right?

Another time, when I came home from school, these boys said something bad to me again. One of them pulled my hair from the back and pushed me down. I fell down and cried. A taxi driver stopped them. When I got home, I told my mom, and she then went to their house, but they still didn’t want to say sorry.

I am not afraid of them, though, but I try holding myself hard to just ignore them. My brother always says to ignore them.

Since I am in the sixth grade now, there are days where I stay longer in school for extra classes. That’s fine, as I need to be prepared for the exams. I take extra classes in math, science and Indonesian language. But sometimes when I got home, I was too tired from walking under the hot sun to study again or do my homework.

When I finish school, I am going to be a doctor! I want to help people who are sick. But if they don’t have money, I will do it for free. It’s all right. Even though our government has health insurance, it is not enough to cover everything.

One day I saw in the news that a mother had just given birth. The hospital kept the baby longer as the baby was born premature, and the family couldn’t afford the cost for the treatment. That’s why I want to be a doctor, to help people in need like that.

I really am happy I was given the bicycle by ChildFund. I will ride the bike to school. The bicycle lets me get to school on time, and now I have more time to do my homework. I will even take my brother in the back saddle!

You can help girls like Aisyah by donating a Dream Bike. One bicycle costs $100, and its value is priceless. Stay tuned for more Dream Bike stories from Jakarta, coming soon.

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