5thBDay

Remember When You Were 5?

Zeneza

Five-year-old Zeneza of Timor-Leste.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Here at ChildFund, we think a lot about children who are five and younger. A child’s fifth birthday is an important milestone because the most significant development — physical, social and cognitive — occurs in the first five years of life. This is when language, motor coordination, problem solving and self-control become more defined. But approximately 200 million children under the age of five are not receiving the proper nutrition, stimulation, and education that they need to reach their full potential.

Kate

Here I am, getting ready for the first day of kindergarten.

That’s why ChildFund is taking part in 5th Birthday and Beyond, a campaign culminating with an event on Capitol Hill on June 25 that focuses on the health of children around the world. More than 100 nongovernmental organizations (including ChildFund), businesses, philanthropic groups and others have formed a coalition to create awareness of worldwide improvements in children’s health around the world and what remains to be done.

As ChildFund President and CEO Anne Lynam Goddard notes, “My great hope for the 5th Birthday and Beyond campaign is that it will inspire many more of us to invest in providing children living in poverty with the support they need — not just to survive, but also to dream, achieve and contribute.”

Some of the news is excellent: In 2014, 6 million fewer children will die before their fifth birthday than 25 years ago. Polio is largely eradicated, and in the past 12 years, fewer children have died from pneumonia, diarrhea, measles, malaria, and AIDS. Credit goes to many groups in the U.S. and around the globe, including U.S. foreign assistance programs, UNICEF, the World Health Organization and numerous NGOs like ChildFund.

Nonetheless, there are still many battles to fight, as 6.6 million children under five are expected to die this year, primarily from preventable diseases. Public awareness is the first step in overcoming these serious obstacles to better health among the youngest people in developing countries.

We’ll have more information as 5th Birthday and Beyond approaches, but for now, we ask you to go into your photo albums and find a picture of yourself when you were around five years old. Then, when June 23 (the launch of the social media campaign) comes, post your photo as your avatar on social media and send out a message about the importance of child survival and health to share with your community.

Here are some numbers that may help you, and don’t forget to tag your message with #5thbday. Thank you for your help!

Anne Goddard at 5

ChildFund President and CEO Anne Goddard, dressed for kindergarten graduation.

The Day of the Dead: An Opportunity to Honor Children Who Didn’t See Their Fifth Birthday

By Gabriela Ramírez, ChildFund Mexico Communications Officer, and Patricia Toquica, Americas Region Communications Manager

The beginning of November marks a special celebration in most Latin American countries: the Day of the Dead. The first two days of the month are dedicated to remembering and honoring loved ones who have passed away. These celebrations have their origins in the pre-Hispanic era and symbolize death and rebirth.

Earlier this month, we had the opportunity to celebrate this occasion with the Quechua communities while visiting ChildFund programs in Ecuador. Specifically, Nov. 1 is dedicated to honoring infants, while Nov. 2 is devoted to remembering deceased adults.

Bread shaped as a child

One of the most common customs is the making of altars to welcome departed spirits home. Vigils are held, and families go to cemeteries to be with the souls of the departed and to present them with offerings and flowers. Ceremonial foods include the colada morada, a spiced fruit porridge, and the guagua de pan (guagua means child in Quechua language), a bread shaped as a little child, wrapped in traditional clothing and beautifully decorated as a symbol of remembrance of those infants who passed away.

Sharing the traditional foods and customs with the mothers, children and elders in the community made us reflect on the precious lives of children and sadly reminded us of the many children who die every day, especially in developing countries due to lack of water, sanitation, food or proper care. Each day, nearly 19,000 children die before their fifth birthday. That’s almost 800 every hour, according to World Health Organization’s 2011 stats.

The celebration of the Day of the Dead – also very important in other countries where ChildFund works in the Americas including Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Bolivia – was a special opportunity to honor the many children who didn’t make it to their fifth birthday. It reaffirmed our commitment to work toward providing access to health care and nutrition, educating caregivers and creating safe environments for the growth and development of millions of children born into challenging conditions around the world.

This is our commitment. We want more children to be able to celebrate the Day of the Dead, and not just be remembered on that date.

Clean Hands Save Lives

Reporting by Zoe Hogan, ChildFund Timor-Leste

Timor-Leste has some of the highest rates of maternal and child mortality in the world. More than 5 percent of Timorese children die before their fifth birthday, in comparison to 0.4 percent and 0.8 percent of children in Australia and the U.S., respectively, according to UNICEF reports.

Through health, water and sanitation projects, ChildFund is working to save children’s lives by increasing community knowledge about the prevention and treatment of common diseases.

men and women at exhibit booth

ChildFund Timor-Leste staff, led by National Director Dr. Geoffrey Ezepue (third from right), meet with government representatives, led by Health Minister Dr. Nelson Martins (fourth from right) and President of the Commission F of the National Parliament, Virgilio Maria Dias Marcal (far right).

Last week, the Ministry of Health in Timor-Leste organized a national conference on non-communicable diseases. ChildFund was one of the conference exhibitors, setting up an educational booth about our community health programs in Timor-Leste. Staff members provided antibacterial soap, health information and hand-washing advice to conference attendees and passersby, including university students, local children, academics and dignitaries.

man demonstrates hand washing

Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao discusses hand washing with ChildFund Timor-Leste WASH Project Manager Sigit Pramono.

The exhibit caught the attention of Timor-Leste’s Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao, who spent 10 minutes at ChildFund’s booth, demonstrating proper hand-washing techniques with ChildFund Timor-Leste staff.

Hosted by the Ministry of Health, ChildFund Timor-Leste, Church World Service and the World Health Organization, the conference, held in the capital city of Dili, sought to improve collaboration and strategic planning between government and NGOs in the health sector.

“People who are poor or who live in underserved communities have less access to medical care and good nutrition,” said Dr. Nelson Martins, Timor-Leste Health Minister. “They face greater environmental health hazards and are harder to reach through outreach and education efforts. So as we move forward, we understand that we must also address the social and economic factors that can put people at greater risk for chronic disease.”

children and youth wash hands

ChildFund staff members show local children how to wash their hands properly.

Martins also visited the ChildFund booth, asking numerous questions about ChildFund Timor-Leste’s health projects in rural communities.

Throughout the conference, ChildFund staff engaged young people at the event, with competitions to test their hand-washing and fingernail-cutting techniques. In partnership with the Alola Foundation, ChildFund also ran a trivia quiz about nutrition and maternal health. Nearly 250 conference-goers participated in these fun and educational activities. Prizes included practical items like towels, nail cutters and T-shirts.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 805 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter