75th anniversary

ChildFund’s Year in Review

 

Typhoon Haiyan aid

Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines in November, was the strongest storm to hit the region in many years. ChildFund has worked to get resources to the affected communities since the storm hit.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

When I think of 2013, I see great waves of floodwater. Over the past year, a typhoon and a cyclone struck communities in India and the Philippines, causing great devastation to families we serve, as well as our local partner organizations and national office staff. Yet these disasters also gave us the opportunity to show the best of our human spirit, whether it was through donations or assistance on the ground.

Here’s a look back at some of ChildFund’s highlights in 2013.

cyclone Phailin

Houses in Bhubaneswar, India, were deluged with floodwater in October, when Cyclone Phailin struck.

In November, Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm to hit the Philippines in many years, blew through several communities that ChildFund serves. Nationwide, more than 6,000 people died, and 550,000 homes were destroyed. We are still collecting donations to help those who lost their homes and belongings, as well as giving psychosocial support to children and families who were traumatized by the storm’s destruction.  In October, Cyclone Phailin struck eastern India, causing massive flooding and the destruction of homes and more than a million acres of farmland.  Our support there continues.

Our work against exploitative child labor took center stage in mid-June, when we recognized World Day Against Child Labor. We learned how child labor takes many forms, whether it’s in a sugarcane field, a mine or inside the home; sometimes, it’s hard to tell when children and youth are being exploited because of the secrecy surrounding the practice. In fact, a poll we commissioned in June revealed that 73 of Americans surveyed believe that only 1 million children are working in exploitative conditions. Wrong: The actual number is closer to 150 million. It’s important to pay attention to the signs and to make efforts to support industries that are taking a stand against child labor. ChildFund Alliance also launched the Free From Violence and Exploitation petition this year, aiming to make child protection a priority in the United Nations’ post-2015 goals.

child labor

Child labor is a serious problem in many of the countries where ChildFund works, such as Bolivia, where this boy shines shoes.

In November, the Alliance released the results of its Small Voices, Big Dreams children’s survey, asking children what they would do if they were president of their countries, as well as what they consider the most important issues of the day. As usual, children gave wise and considered responses to our questions.

In September, ChildFund began marking its 75th anniversary, a landmark that our national offices, Alliance members and international office have recognized with numerous events, including meetings and celebrations with staff members, our Alliance countries, board members and, of course, sponsored children. Our 75-post anniversary blog series, which shares historical photos and stories — as well as the views of sponsors, children, Alliance members and staff — continues through the end of March.

As we take a look back at the past, we employ our history to lend perspective to ChildFund’s work and to help determine our future goals. Just as our founder, Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke, declared in October 1938, the well-being of children in need remains at the heart of ChildFund. Thank you for your past and present support, and have a happy and healthy 2014!

Kenya in 1988

A photo from our archives depicts our Kenya operations in 1988.

The Amazing Legacy of Our Hong Kong Alumni

By Steve Stirling, EVP/Chief Administration Officer, ChildFund International

Each year, about 300 people who lived in Christian Children’s Fund’s orphanages in Hong Kong in the late 1950s and early 1960s, as well as their spouses, gather in Hong Kong to celebrate and reflect upon how their lives were inextricably changed forever.

75th ChildFund logoAs part of the 75th anniversary celebration of ChildFund International (formerly known as Christian Children’s Fund), I too had the opportunity to attend the reunion in November.

Dr. Verent Mills, CCF’s third executive director (and before that, our overseas director), was like a father to many of the Hong Kong alumni. They remember being fortunate to grow up in an orphanage village started by Dr. Mills in Hong Kong. Many, if not most, of the orphans who escaped from war-torn China would not have survived if their paths did not meet that of Dr. Mills and CCF. 

Hong Kong alumni

A moment for a group of our Hong Kong alumni to gather and share memories. Steve Stirling is in the center, wearing a white shirt.

My trip to Hong Kong reminded me of how many people before us faithfully served the mission of ChildFund International, and we are here today standing on the shoulders of giants. ChildFund left a legacy of faith, love and hope for hundreds of orphaned Chinese girls and boys, who are now continuing the legacy of giving back as adults. 

In our 2013 annual report we shared that we have helped 18.1 million children and family members in the past year to reach their potential. Our reach is exponentially greater than this number because of people like the Hong Kong alumni, who have assisted thousands of others through their generosity.

Among them, there are successful doctors, surgeons, bankers and building contractors, but there is one man who stands out to me, having had a difficult life as a laborer with only a sixth-grade education. He lives in Australia with his wife and made a generous donation, especially in proportion to his income, to the endowment fund named for Dr. Mills. This man was unable to attend the gathering in Hong Kong, but he sent this note with his donation:

Please accept our small offering to express our sincere gratitude and support of the works of ChildFund International. May our Lord bless ChildFund, as well all the people working there. Last but not least, may we say a big THANK YOU! 

Please enjoy a short video slideshow of our Hong Kong alumni from past and present day:

 

Sponsor and Child Find Strength and Hope Through Letters

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

In April 2012, David Jenkins found himself on his sofa, watching TV while recovering from surgery in his Las Vegas home. That’s when he saw a commercial for ChildFund, and his attention was captured by the children on the screen. His next step was to go to our website’s financial accountability section to do some research.   

75th ChildFund logo“I liked what I saw,” David says, and he decided: “Well, I’m going to do this.” He began reading profiles of children in Mexico, in part because he knows two Mexican women who told him about some of their hardships growing up, challenges that many girls still face. The opportunity to get to know the child and immediate family by exchanging letters was also important to David. Right on the first page of search results for Mexico was Jessica, a girl from Ocumicho, in the state of Michoacan. She wore her hair in pigtails and looked quite serious and sad. “I’m not a big believer in divine intervention,” David says, “but I felt I needed to sponsor that little girl right there.”

Jessica's early photo

This is the picture of Jessica that David saw on ChildFund’s site.

Today, nearly two years later, David and Jessica maintain a strong friendship through their correspondence; they write to each other about every three weeks. Jessica’s grandmother, who looks after her, sent David some homemade pillow covers last Christmas, which he cherishes. Sometimes there’s a delay in mail service, but the friends continue to write each other regularly. They agreed early on to write when they have something to say, whether or not they’ve received a letter lately, David notes, and they make sure to record dates on the letters so they can keep up with the chronology of events if one letter falls behind. “It really takes things to a whole different level,” he says of their correspondence, which has taught him a great deal about Jessica’s community. “What I’ve learned is it’s a very traditional town. They’ve been through a lot of struggles.”

Jessica is part of the Purépecha Indian tribe, whose members speak an indigenous language and were one of Mexico’s pre-Columbian civilizations. In the 1500s, the Purépechas managed to hold off the Mexica Empire, which tried to conquer them. These days, David says, most are farmers, earning only $100 to $200 a month. Her community is known for creating carved masks and figurines, but tourism has declined in recent years, so this source of income for the village has decreased.

Jessica today

A happier Jessica writes a letter to David.

Jessica and David often exchange the Purépechan phrase “juchari uinapikua,” or “our strength,” in their letters, and they often share stories about their activities, including Jessica’s participation in local festivals. One of her favorite things is dancing, and she also loves reading, drawing and coloring pictures, especially of flowers. 

“I think it’s very important to go to school,” says Jessica, who’s now in sixth grade, “because then I’ll have better opportunities …. I think that having a sponsor has changed my life. From my sponsor, I learned to be honest, as he has been with me, and to be generous.”

In addition to his sponsorship of Jessica, David has encouraged several friends and coworkers to sponsor other children in Ocumicho, including Jessica’s friends and classmates. Often, Jessica serves as “town crier” when she hears that David has found a new sponsor, spreading the news.

“She’s got a very big heart and has wonderful priorities for a child her age,” he says, and Jessica, who just turned 11, is feeling hopeful about her future. “Her dream was to get her vocational degree and become a secretary,” David recalls, but now she has mentioned becoming a teacher after attending university, or perhaps another professional career. Noting that she loves mathematics, David wonders if she’ll pursue engineering. At the end of 2012, David started a university fund for Jessica, contributing part of his annual tax return.  “I’ve got a feeling that whatever she does, it’ll be something that helps people,” he says, calling her a ray of “inspirational sunshine and perspective.”

ChildFund staff members from our Mexico office recently met up with Jessica and recorded a short video, in which she explains in her own words what sponsorship has meant to her.

Honduras and Brazil Celebrate ChildFund’s 75th

By ChildFund Brasil staff and Lylli Moya, ChildFund Honduras

Many of our national offices have thrown celebrations recently for ChildFund’s 75th anniversary. Here are some photos from these events, taken by staff members from our offices in Brazil and Honduras.

Brazil

Brasil 75th

From left: Isam Ghanim, executive vice president of programs; Gerson Pacheco, national director of ChildFund Brasil; Paul Bode, regional director of the Americas, and Valseni Braga, president of ChildFund Brasil, cut the cake.

 

ChildFund Brasil cake

Brazil’s beautiful cake. Translated from Portuguese, this says “fund for children.”

 Honduras

ChildFund Honduras held two celebrations, involving sponsored children and youth, representatives from our local partners, staff members and local officials.

ChildFund Honduras staff

ChildFund Honduras staff members gather for a group photo.

 

Honduran youth

Youth perform a skit at one of Honduras’ celebrations.

 

Mayra

Mayra, 12, spoke about ChildFund’s impact on her life. “I was born with a neurological problem. My parents didn´t know how to help me, but with the help from a Guide Mother they learned about early stimulation.”

Honduras 75th shirt

A specially designed shirt for Honduras’ celebration.

 

ChildFund Sweden Takes Strong Stance on Child Protection

By Carolina Ehrnrooth, Secretary General, Barnfonden (ChildFund Sweden)

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Sweden.

75th ChildFund logoSofia, 14, has a friendly smile and an air of confidence. She is the chairperson of the student parliament in her school in central Ethiopia. When she grows up, she hopes to be a doctor. But a year ago this dream was about to disappear.

Sofia’s stepfather and her mother wanted to send her to Saudi Arabia or another foreign country to work. They felt her income was needed to support the family, and this had a higher priority than her education. But Sofia managed to hold her ground. She had learned about the importance of education and the dangers connected with child migration in her youth club in school.

Sofia of Ethiopia

Sofia

Sofia spoke to her siblings and her teacher, who in turn spoke to her parents — and managed to change their minds. It was a close call because her stepfather had already arranged a false identity card stating her age as 18, and an application for a passport was the next step.

The situation could have turned out differently had Sofia’s school not been taking part in a three-year project working against harmful traditional practices (HTP). Barnfonden is supporting the project, working through ChildFund Ethiopia and a local partner organization.

Carolina Ehrnrooth

Carolina Ehrnrooth (center) at a school in Ethiopia.

Hundreds of village leaders, health workers, local officials, religious leaders and school headmasters are part of this project, which is aimed at changing attitudes and behaviors through information and education. The goal is to reach 20,000 children and youths, to increase their knowledge and awareness of the consequences of HTP, a broad definition that includes female circumcision, child marriage, heavy and dangerous child labor and child migration. The project is based in central Ethiopia, with many sponsored children.

Since Barnfonden was started 22 years ago by BØRNEfonden (ChildFund Denmark), we have managed to increase our support to children in need every year. We have developed from being mainly a sponsorship charity to a broader organization that has diverse fundraising sources and many activities that help children in need.  

Cambodian girls

Barnfonden began working in Cambodia in 2009.

With the help of the ChildFund Alliance, we have started advocacy efforts and raised our voice in the national arena for the causes of child protection and prevention of child violence. Today, we have 25,000 sponsors supporting 27,000 children in 25 countries. With the help of our sponsors, children in need are provided with education, better health care and the means and training to make a living on their own as adults.

To our delight, we also see an increase in funding from institutions and corporate partners, making it possible for us to support projects like the work against harmful traditional practices in Ethiopia. Our ultimate goal is to help even more children and families.

In everything we do, we remind ourselves about the children and families we are working for. And we remain grateful to our faithful sponsors, other supporters and corporate partners.

Important Dates in Barnfonden’s History

2005: Supported more than 20,000 sponsored children

2005: Started a dedicated project in Rajastan, India, in partnership with ChildFund International

2007: Received accreditation as the first member organization of ChildFund Alliance

2009: Started a partnership with ChildFund Australia and its programs in Cambodia

2011: Launched a designated project in Selingue, Mali, in partnership with BØRNEfonden

2011: Celebrated our 20th anniversary

2012: Began a project against harmful traditional practices (HTP) with ChildFund Ethiopia

2013: Supported a children’s rights project in Myanmar (Burma) in partnership with ChildFund Australia

2013: Currently supporting 27,000 sponsored children

ChildFund’s 75th Celebrated Around the World

By ChildFund Staff in Kenya, Liberia, Mexico and Mozambique

Many of our national offices have thrown celebrations recently for ChildFund’s 75th anniversary. Here are some photos from these events (featuring lots of ChildFund’s special shade of green), taken by staff members from our offices in Kenya, Liberia, Mexico and Mozambique. Enjoy!

 Nairobi, Kenya

Kenya celebration

Kenya celebration

Maputo, Mozambique

Mozambican children

Mexico City, Mexico

Mexico staff members

Monrovia, Liberia

Liberia staff

Liberia cake

Celebrating 75 Years of Lifesaving Work for Children

By Bolette Christensen, CEO, BØRNEfonden

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Denmark.

75th ChildFund logoWe at BØRNEfonden are very proud to be part of the long-lasting effort made by the members of ChildFund Alliance to ease the grip of poverty for local communities in Africa, Latin America and Asia. While we are now commemorating ChildFund International’s 75 years of important work, last year BØRNEfonden also reached an organizational milestone. We celebrated our 40th anniversary as the Danish representative of the ChildFund Alliance. Last year, as now, there is plenty to celebrate.

First of all, BØRNEfonden remains Denmark’s largest development organization financed by private funds. We have more than 45,000 sponsors supporting 65,000 children and their families in 25 countries.

Cambodia

Bolette Christensen with children in Cambodia. Photo: BØRNEfonden.

In recent years, our cooperation with private businesses has become an integral part of our work. Donations from private companies have increased 40 percent since 2010, and investing in development and job creation in Africa has become a matter of greater interest in the Danish private sector.

These numbers tell us that within the Danish population and business life, there is a strong confidence in the way BØRNEfonden works by focusing on long-term development.

Working in West Africa

Many of BØRNEfonden’s sponsors support children in countries where work on the ground is carried out by other members of the Alliance, and we greatly appreciate the collaboration. BØRNEfonden itself has opened offices in five West African countries. After opening in Cape Verde in the late 1980s, offices were established in Togo, Benin and Burkina Faso in the 1990s. In 2003, Mali became the most recent member of BØRNEfonden’s program countries.

Even though there have been many significant occasions worthy to mention here in all of our program countries, BØRNEfonden’s work in Cape Verde stands out.

Cape Verde children

Children in Cape Verde. Photo: Henrik A. Jensen.

In 1989, BØRNEfonden initiated its effort in Cape Verde, an island off the coast of West Africa. At that time nearly one-third of all children in the country didn’t start school, and 46 of every 1,000 didn’t live to celebrate their first birthday. Today, these numbers have improved significantly. Currently, 99 percent of all Cape Verdean children start school, and nine out of 10 finish primary school. Infant mortality has dropped to 29 out of 1,000, becoming one of the lowest rates in Africa. Due to the positive development, last year BØRNEfonden began a five-year phase-out of its efforts in Cape Verde, creating a path for leaders in the local community to carry on this work independently.

In 1989, the slogan for the work to be done in Cape Verde was ”Help to Self-Help.” Today in 2013, it is clear that the support from sponsors and donors has paid off in Cape Verde. Not only has this support given individual children and families better chances for a more hopeful future, but it has also contributed to the general development of the country.

As we look forward, this story is important to keep in mind. It reminds us that the work we do actually does work.

Meet Rukhsana Ayyub, National Director for ChildFund’s U.S. Program

Interview by Sierra Winston, ChildFund Communications Intern

In our 75-post series in honor of ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we’re talking with several of our national directors who oversee operations in the countries where we work in Africa, the Americas and Asia. Rukhsana Ayyub, national director for our U.S. Program, has been with ChildFund since March 2010 and is based in Memphis, Tenn.

75th ChildFund logoWhere did you work before ChildFund?

I worked with CARE International and was posted in Pakistan, Thailand and Bangladesh. Before that, I worked for many years in the field of addiction in New York.

What is your favorite thing about working at ChildFund?

ChildFund’s approach of making a long-term commitment to each child, knowing that change does not happen overnight.

What successes have you had in your national office?

The Area Strategic Plans developed in each of our program areas in the U.S. are a major accomplishment. We have successfully conducted the ASPs in Oklahoma, Mississippi and South Dakota and are completing one in Texas. These plans were developed through extensive community consultations, which allowed us to hear the community’s voices and their needs and aspirations for the future. Cultural and family restoration emerged as strong needs of communities in Mississippi and South Dakota.

Rukhsana and three children

Rukhsana with three children enrolled in a ChildFund program in Mississippi.

What motivates you in life?

Throughout my life, I have admired people who do not accept injustice and inequality but are willing to make a change, not waiting for someone to come and rescue them but in their own small or big way are making an effort. I continue to seek such change- makers in my work, my circle of friends and in my selection of readings.

In my current work with ChildFund, as I travel through some of the most poverty-affected areas in the U.S., I have had the good luck of witnessing many emerging leaders among the youth and children. There is a young girl in Mississippi whose only family member was just arrested and imprisoned, yet she comes and volunteers at a program for children to teach them reading. Witnessing her strength gives me hope and motivates me.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I love to read. My work with ChildFund has expanded my understanding of some unique and special ethnic populations in United States. In my spare time, I continue to read books written by and about Native Americans and African Americans.

I am a good knitter and have been knitting shawls, hats and scarves, which I usually donate to friends, neighbors and children’s hospitals. This year I was blessed with a grandchild, Sophia, so now I am enjoying knitting for her.

child's drawing

A drawing by a child in our U.S. program.

Who is your role model?

It is difficult to come up with one name; I have been blessed from an early age to have been exposed to the words and examples of some very special people from around the world. At various stages in my life, I have been affected by the words and deeds of some exemplary leaders and poets: Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Rabindranath Tagore, Martin Luther King Jr., Rumi and the Dalai Lama are a few that come to mind.

And then, of course, my work allows me to see people living under very difficult circumstances and overcoming challenges and making a difference. They are role models too and give me the opportunity to learn and derive strength from them.

What is a quote, saying or belief that you live by?

Two come to mind: Let there be change in the world, and let it begin with me.

The second one is in Urdu, a verse by Iqbal:

Tundiay baday mukhalif say na gabhra ai uqab.

Yeh to chalti hai tujhe uncha uranay kay liya.

Do not be afraid of the strong winds, o eagle.

The winds blow so strong so that you may fly even higher.

Looking Back at Our First Board Meeting

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

The first board meeting of China’s Children Fund (the precursor to Christian Children’s Fund and ChildFund International) took place on Dec. 9, 1938, at a private dining room in the Occidental Restaurant, in downtown Richmond, Va.  At the time, CCF already had an office on Main Street.

Occidental Restaurant

The Occidental Restaurant, where China’s Children Fund board members held their first meeting. Courtesy Library of Virginia.

In attendance were a group of distinguished Virginians, including CCF’s first board president, Eudora Ramsay Richardson, and its secretary, T. Nelson Parker. Richardson served as president until 1944, when she was replaced on the board by future CEO Verbon Kemp. Parker was board president for nearly 30 years.

The first year of CCF’s existence was phenomenally successful. At the second board meeting in February 1939, our founder, Dr. Calvitt Clarke, recommended an initial contribution of $2,000 to Chinese orphans’ relief. This goal was quickly eclipsed, with $13,000 going to the KuKong Orphanage and other funds sent directly to Madame Chiang Kai-shek, who also was assisting orphans.

CCF's 1967 board

A 1967 board meeting. Seated fourth from the left is Executive Director Verbon Kemp and to his left, at the head of the table, is Chairman T. Nelson Parker.

ChildFund’s board of directors now meets several times a year to discuss the direction of our organization. During their last meeting, in October, we celebrated ChildFund’s 75th anniversary with a luncheon

75th celebration

Current board members and staff gather for a celebratory 75th anniversary lunch this past October at ChildFund’s International Office in Richmond, Va.

In Zambia, ChildFund Celebrates Two Anniversaries

Zambia celebration

ChildFund’s Zambian office recently celebrated its 30th anniversary — and ChildFund’s 75th.

By Tenagne Mekonnen, Africa Regional Communications Manager

ChildFund’s Zambian office recently celebrated two important anniversaries — the national office’s 30th and ChildFund’s 75th — with an event for children, community members and local and national leaders.

75th ChildFund logoDorothy Kazunga, Zambia’s deputy minister of Community Development, Mother and Child Health, was among the honored guests and shared the government’s progress in improving the well-being of children in Zambia. She listened to the testimony of children, youth and community members and spoke about the good work ChildFund is doing. Kazunga also handed out awards to children for their artwork and other creative endeavors.   

Victor Koyi

Victor Koyi, ChildFund’s East and South Africa regional director.

Victor Koyi, ChildFund’s East and South Africa regional director, also attended the celebrations. “ChildFund is a proud organization because of its successful impact on children,” he said. “Today we have government officials, doctors, lawyers, teachers and confident children here in Zambia and all over the world.” He added that the organization is looking forward to the coming years, with the best yet to come for children.  

Board members, local partner representatives, children and community leaders shared their thoughts, showing what it was like before ChildFund came to the communities and since. Schools have improved, health facilities are better equipped, income is higher, and children have higher levels of confidence and self-reliance, they said.

Zambia celebration

Children perform at Zambia’s celebration.

 

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