Americas

1 2 3 27

Thanks, Mom!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by ChildFund staff members and photographer Jake Lyell

Mothers are crucial to ChildFund’s mission, whether they’re guide mothers in the Americas spreading reliable health and nutrition information, three Indonesian mothers growing vegetables for their families, or a group of Ugandan moms who are contributing to a village savings and loan program. Or the numerous grandmothers raising their grandchildren in Mozambique after they lost their parents to AIDS. This Sunday is Mother’s Day in the United States, a time when many of us celebrate our mothers and mother-figures in our lives — women who are there to listen or laugh with us, or sometimes tell us hard truths. Above are some pictures of moms from around the world who are connected with ChildFund’s programs. We have more in common with them than you may believe possible.

Join us on our Facebook page today to share your photos and thoughts about your mother or other important women in your life. We’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

Keep Up With Ecuador Earthquake Updates

Reporting from ChildFund Ecuador

A 7.8-magnitude earthquake hit Ecuador on April 16, leading to hundreds of deaths and widespread destruction in the western part of the country. ChildFund does not work in this region (only a few families in our program area were affected, and they have received help), but we are working with Alliance partner Educo, as well as Ecuador’s government and other nongovernmental organizations, to assist families in the worst-affected communities. Read more on our Ecuador emergency page.

ecuador emergency pic

A truck delivers supplies for Ecuador earthquake victims.

Well-Deserved Rewards in Bolivia

children in Bolivia

Preschool students clap during an event at their school in Bolivia. 
Andreina's mother and two sisters, plus school and local partner CESDI staff members, took part in the presentation.

Andreina’s mother and two sisters, plus school and local partner CESDI staff members, took part in the presentation.

In January, we announced the winner of ChildFund’s second annual Community Video Contest, an entry from Bolivia starring Andreina, a young woman who helps others despite living in poverty. Her prize from ChildFund was $150, which could be used for educational purposes, including film equipment or editing software.

Instead, Andreina decided to donate the money to a local preschool in La Paz to provide puzzles and toys that would stimulate the children (ages 5 and under) intellectually and creatively. These learning materials will help teachers create an early stimulation classroom at the school, which is attended by 53 children enrolled in ChildFund’s activities. Abraham Marca, our communications officer in Bolivia, shared some details.

“On March 3, we made the presentation at the school, and the teachers and children surprised us by performing a skit,” Abraham says. “Unfortunately, Andreina couldn’t attend because she is studying accounting and social work at a university. Instead, her mother and two younger sisters were there.”

Besides winning the international film contest, Andreina was a finalist in ChildFund Bolivia’s national photography contest, in which youth groups and local partner organizations throughout the country participate. She’ll soon receive an award from our national office in Bolivia, and the preschool also plans to invite Andreina to the opening of the early stimulation classroom.

Saying Goodbye in the Caribbean

A little boy enjoys a day at his preschool in Dominica.

A little girl enjoys a day at her preschool in Dominica.

This summer, after more than four decades of work in the region, ChildFund will close our last two offices in the Caribbean, in the countries of St. Vincent and Dominica. Although we’ll miss the many people we’ve met there over the years, we leave future work in the capable hands of the staff members of two local organizations. They’ve received years of training and support from ChildFund, and they’re committed to protecting children’s rights and helping them fulfill their potential.  To learn more about what is happening in the Caribbean, please read this story on our website.

 

 

Happy International Women’s Day!

Liberian women
Today is International Women’s Day, a time to celebrate the important women in our lives. These Liberian women helped a 5-year-old girl get necessary medical treatment abroad.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

ChildFund’s primary focus is helping children who live in poverty, but it doesn’t take long to figure out that women play key roles in this mission. Whether they’re mothers, grandmothers, sisters, government officials, business owners or other role models, women influence the course of children’s lives and shape communities and nations. One day is not nearly enough to celebrate the important women in our lives, but it’s a start. Below, meet some of the remarkable women connected with ChildFund around the world.

Phanny, a former sponsored child, is now a supervisor at Autoworld in Zambia. She’s the only woman who works at her branch, an accomplishment that’s even more impressive given the fact that Phanny had to miss school sometimes to work odd jobs with her sister after their parents died.

Else, another former sponsored child, just graduated from nursing school in Indonesia. She’s from a village where few people continue their studies after high school, but Else is now pursuing a master’s degree in nursing so she can work in a hospital.

“I love taking care of young children,” she says. “Soon, I will be working in a hospital, helping young children in need.”

Johanna, a ChildFund-supported trainer mother from Ecuador, is taking steps to end the cycle of parental abuse and neglect that has affected many children. She estimates that up to 20 percent of children in her small village suffer abuse at the hands of their parents. Through home visits and workshops, Johanna works with parents and other caregivers to show them how to support their children’s development.

“Children don’t feel respected by their parents,” she says. “It’s something that really scars them. It’s like an inheritance, because the child learns these things and replicates them.”

Rita, a young mother in Guatemala, is training to be a guide mother, an important role in many Central and South American communities where we work. Despite the demands placed on her time by two small children, Rita takes weekly classes on parenting skills, children’s learning styles, children’s rights, nutrition, play and more. She’ll then lead education sessions for other mothers in her community.

“I didn’t get a chance to study,” she says, “so this is also my turn to learn.”

Today (or any day at all), let’s think of the women who have made a positive impact on our lives — and thank them!

An Entrepreneurial Sisterhood in Ecuador

Ecuador girls with chickens

Photo from ChildFund Ecuador.

Maria Angelina, María Beatriz and María Fatima are triplets who live in Ecuador‘s Carchi Province and participate in their community’s social and financial project, which is supported by ChildFund. Through this program, they have begun raising and selling chickens. The sisters say they’re saving money for university, so they can one day find professional work and help support their family. Ecuadorean youth ages 13 to 18 receive financial training through the Aflateen program, and explore concepts such as self-esteem, their rights, gender issues, drug abuse prevention, the environment and job-seeking skills.

Let’s Get Cooking!

Pique Macho Bolivia

In Bolivia, Pique Macho (meat, vegetables and hard-boiled eggs over French fries) is a favorite dish.

This week on our website, we have favorite recipes from our national offices in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Guinea, Honduras, India, Uganda and the United States. We hope you’ll give them a try, and we have a few more recipes below for dishes suggested by ChildFund staff members around the world. You may need to visit a specialty or international grocery store, or order an ingredient online, but don’t let that deter you. Maybe you’ll find a new favorite dish or learn something you didn’t know about your sponsored child’s home cuisine. Post a picture on our Facebook page if you decide to cook a new dish, and happy eating!

From Bolivia: Pique Macho, as seen in the picture.

From Sri Lanka: Semolina and Coconut Rock (sweet); Deviled Potatoes

From Timor-Leste: Koto, or Red Bean Soup, is akin to a familiar Portuguese soup and Brazil’s national dish, feijoada. Portuguese is spoken in Timor-Leste and Brazil, so it’s not surprising that the same recipes would pass through their populations, too, with adjustments for taste and ingredients’ availability. Because red (or kidney) beans are more common than black beans in Timor-Leste, cooks use them in their soup, and pork or beef can replace chorizo.

From Uganda: Beef and Groundnut (Peanut) Stew; Katogo. Katogo is a dish made with tripe or sweetmeats (also known as offal) and matoke, a green and savory banana similar to a plantain. Are you feeling adventurous?

 

Try Ecuador’s Quinoa and Cheese Soup

Quinoa and Cheese Soup, garnished with a bay leaf.
Quinoa and Cheese Soup, garnished with bay leaves.

Recipe from Veronica Travez, ChildFund Ecuador

Quinoa originated in the Andean region of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. It was an important crop for the Inca Empire, known as “the mother of all grains,” and was first cultivated more than 5,000 years ago. Most people assume quinoa is a grain, but it is actually a seed that provides essential vitamins, minerals and fiber that help regulate the digestive system. It does not contain any gluten. At 8 grams a cup, it is high in protein and is considered a complete protein because it contains all 9 essential amino acids.

The United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) declared 2013 the International Year of the Quinoa to raise awareness of how this crop provides good nutrition and increases food security.

Here’s a recipe for Quinoa and Cheese Soup, plus pictures of some of the ingredients. Please enjoy, and find more recipes to try here!

INGREDIENTS

1 cup dry quinoa

1 pound potatoes, peeled and diced

½ cup green onion, finely chopped

¼ cup diced carrot

1 tablespoon annatto seed oil

4 cups water

1 cup milk

1 cup queso fresco, crumbled or broken into pieces

Salt and cumin, to taste

Parsley or cilantro, to garnish

 

DIRECTIONS

Rinse the quinoa to remove its natural coating, saponin, which can taste bitter. Let it rest in some water for 15 minutes before draining. In a pot, heat the annatto (achiote) seed oil and the onions for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Pour in the 4 cups of water and bring to a boil. Then, add quinoa and carrot, and cook until the quinoa opens or thickens. Add the potatoes and cook until they are soft. Add the milk and the cheese and cook for 3 minutes, being careful not to scald the milk. Season with salt and cumin to taste. Garnish with parsley or cilantro. Serves 4.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

They’re Ready for Football

Were you among the millions of people watching NFL football yesterday? The Denver-New England game was thrilling, and the Panthers are going to be formidable opponents for the Broncos. Children in the countries where we work also love playing games, especially football (aka soccer in the United States). Enjoy these pictures from Asia, the Americas and Africa. Goooooal!!!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Do You Have a Buffalo in Your Kitchen Pantry?

 

Buffalo_at_Custer_State_Park,_South_Dakota
A buffalo at Custer State Park in South Dakota. Photo by Jack Siebold, MyTown Black Hills.

We have a little sneak preview for you today: A buffalo stew recipe from the Lakota tribe in South Dakota, one of the areas in the United States where ChildFund works. Sponsor relations manager Lori Arrow sent us this recipe, one of several we’ll be bringing you later this month from Asia, Africa and the Americas. You can make wohanpi with beef, but buffalo’s usually leaner — and authentic to this original American Indian stew. In the old days, cooks would have added prairie turnips and blo (wild potatoes), too. In any case, this stew will help keep us warm as some of us (including everyone at ChildFund’s headquarters in Richmond, Virginia) prepare for winter precipitation.

 

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked cubed beef or buffalo meat
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 3 medium potatoes (peeled and cubed)
  • 3 medium carrots (cut in 1/2-inch slices)
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Add the browned meat to the broth in a stock pot. Add carrots, potatoes and Worcestershire sauce. Simmer over low heat for 45 minutes. If using buffalo meat, add the meat to the pot in the last 15 minutes of cooking. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

1 2 3 27
Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,018 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter