Americas

They’re Ready for Football

Were you among the millions of people watching NFL football yesterday? The Denver-New England game was thrilling, and the Panthers are going to be formidable opponents for the Broncos. Children in the countries where we work also love playing games, especially football (aka soccer in the United States). Enjoy these pictures from Asia, the Americas and Africa. Goooooal!!!!

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Do You Have a Buffalo in Your Kitchen Pantry?

 

Buffalo_at_Custer_State_Park,_South_Dakota
A buffalo at Custer State Park in South Dakota. Photo by Jack Siebold, MyTown Black Hills.

We have a little sneak preview for you today: A buffalo stew recipe from the Lakota tribe in South Dakota, one of the areas in the United States where ChildFund works. Sponsor relations manager Lori Arrow sent us this recipe, one of several we’ll be bringing you later this month from Asia, Africa and the Americas. You can make wohanpi with beef, but buffalo’s usually leaner — and authentic to this original American Indian stew. In the old days, cooks would have added prairie turnips and blo (wild potatoes), too. In any case, this stew will help keep us warm as some of us (including everyone at ChildFund’s headquarters in Richmond, Virginia) prepare for winter precipitation.

 

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked cubed beef or buffalo meat
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 3 medium potatoes (peeled and cubed)
  • 3 medium carrots (cut in 1/2-inch slices)
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Add the browned meat to the broth in a stock pot. Add carrots, potatoes and Worcestershire sauce. Simmer over low heat for 45 minutes. If using buffalo meat, add the meat to the pot in the last 15 minutes of cooking. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

Choosing a Winner of ChildFund’s Community Video Contest

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

At the end of the year in the San Francisco Bay area, where I live, the lines to buy cinema tickets are as long as the waits to see Santa. We’re not only at theaters for Hollywood’s latest blockbusters; this is home to more than 50 annual film festivals. Screenings of documentaries, experimental films and cinema from all around the world routinely sell out.

This year, between Christmas and New Year’s, I had a film festival of my very own as I took one last look at entries from ChildFund’s second annual community video challenge: 35 short films, each telling the story of a child’s success. In 2015 our contestants represented 12 countries across all three regions where we work: Africa, the Americas and Asia.

Despite shoestring budgets and novice filmmakers – sponsored children among them – these videos share many qualities with the competition at the Golden Globes and Academy Awards. And for pure authenticity, they beat the professionals hands down.

What makes a winning video? While technical aspects like camera steadiness, smooth transitions and spell-checked captions can certainly make a difference, the best videos tell a story. We all make sense of our experiences through stories. And the most human stories tell of young heroes who, with help from wise adults, overcame enormous odds to achieve their dreams.

Stories develop their characters, present conflicts, portray life’s trajectories and appeal to the audience’s awe, excitement or amusement. They also are, above all, authentic. That’s a lot to accomplish in less than 3 minutes, the limit given our contestants.

Each year, our winners receive small cash awards to help with the purchase of training or equipment, including cameras, tripods, microphones and video-editing products.

In 2015, our judges came from ChildFund’s global communications and sponsorship divisions.

Just as folks don’t always agree with the outcomes of the Oscars, we weren’t unanimous in our choices. But we were all captivated by a video from La Paz, Bolivia, which showed us how a young woman named Andreina rose above her circumstances and is helping others. Rather than filming a traditional video, her community gathered a series of photos documenting her daily activities, adding captions and a soundtrack that made us feel as if we were in the middle of her life.

Here are the best of our 2015 video submissions. Congratulations, and thanks to everyone who entered.

Also, watch the 2014 community video winner from Zambia, featuring 10-year-old Tinashe.

Learn More About Your Child’s Country

family in Sri Lanka

“I like to help my mother to fetch water,” says Kimuna, 8, of Sri Lanka. Photo by Himangi Jayasundere, ChildFund Sri Lanka.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Maybe you’re a new sponsor or a supporter of ChildFund’s programs. Or maybe you’ve been with us a while but want to know more about the country where your sponsored child lives.

You have options! ChildFund’s digital team recently redesigned the Stories & News section of our website, where you can find interviews and pictures of sponsored children, their family members, ChildFund alumni and more. We also have current articles about issues affecting people in the communities where we work, including Ethiopia’s food shortage, early marriage and preparing for natural disasters. Once you’ve looked through the story files, you may want to know even more, which is where our Knowledge Center comes in handy. Publications, research and financial reports are all housed there, going back several years. Thanks for being part of ChildFund’s family, and let’s all have a happy new year!

 

Memorable Images of 2015

These are some of 2015’s most memorable photos taken by ChildFund staff members, local partner organizations’ employees and others — most notably Jake Lyell, a Richmond, Virginia-based photographer and videographer who lived for several years in Uganda and has traveled to numerous countries, including disaster zones, to provide ChildFund with video and photo documentation of our work. We appreciate everyone’s efforts. Read about some of the year’s most memorable people and stories here.

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2015 Highlights: Fighting Ebola, Speaking Out Against Violence

Timor-Leste Children against Violence

Student participants in Timor-Leste’s Children Against Violence program take flight! 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As editor of ChildFund’s blog, I’m taking a look back at a few of the past year’s highlights that reflect the triumphs and struggles in communities where we work. See some of the year’s most memorable photos here.

As 2015 began, ChildFund staff members and local partner organizations were fully engaged in starting and running Interim Care Centers (ICCs) in Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the worst recorded outbreak of Ebola was killing thousands and leaving children orphaned and vulnerable to neglect, sickness and abuse.

ChildFund’s ICCs — staffed by survivors of Ebola, in many cases — helped children who had lost parents and other caregivers by giving them safe spaces to stay during the required 21-day quarantine period while they were observed for symptoms. The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone recently recognized ChildFund’s work to educate children and family members and protect them from the further spread of Ebola.

Facinet Bangoura

Facinet Bangoura

This year, we’ve heard many personal stories of survivors and children touched by the deadly virus. You can read many of them here, but Arthur Tokpah’s interview with Ebola survivor Facinet Bangoura was particularly memorable for me. A young man from Guinea, Facinet contracted Ebola after performing traditional burial rituals for a relative who had died from the virus. He survived, but he explained to us how misinformation led many friends to shun him after he returned to his community. Today, Facinet is on a mission to prevent a further outbreak of Ebola.

Another of ChildFund’s heroes is Flavia Lanuedoc, a longtime staff member of our local partner organization in Dominica, which was hit with massive floods in August. A couple of months later, she shared with us her personal struggle after her house had been cut off from the mainland. Read how Flavia managed to do her job amid great adversity.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

We also can’t forget Momodou Bah, the ChildFund alumnus from The Gambia who is now his nation’s youngest elected official and a 2015 Mandela Washington Fellow, an honor bestowed on young African leaders annually by the White House. Momodou is a remarkable person who is doing a lot of good in his country, despite impoverished beginnings, and now he is back in contact with his former sponsor, Debbie Gautreau.

I also want to pay tribute to all of the people — especially the youngest ones — who spoke up about violence and the importance of giving children safe schools, homes and neighborhoods so they can grow up and achieve their potential. Their numbers are great, and some spoke out in spite of personal risk. Children performing short dramas about corporal abuse in Timor-Leste, a Brazilian girl traveling thousands of miles to speak about violence at a U.N. panel, Bolivian teens drawing maps where gang activity occurs in their community, children across Africa marching against forced marriage — all are examples of amazing commitment that demand respect and attention.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

On a global level, ChildFund Alliance’s Free From Violence campaign joined the voices of many people and organizations worldwide to advocate for the United Nations’ inclusion of a measure to end violence against children in its post-2015 agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals. This effort was successful, as child protection was prominently included in several goals adopted in September. We all hope to see a great deal of progress over the next 15 years and are ready to pitch in wherever we can.

Thank you for your support during 2015, and we wish you a wonderful new year.

Rita of Guatemala: A Student and a Teacher

Guatemala guide mother

Rita is a guide mother in Guatemala’s highlands, and she is learning to lead early childhood education programs in her community.

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

Rita’s first day as a volunteer is filled with bursting nerves, excitement, confidence and fear. At one point, she candidly admits that she wants to do a good job so that those who trained her would be proud of what she learned and how she is applying it.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

She joined ChildFund recently as a guide mother in the highlands of Guatemala. Over the next several years, she will take weekly classes on diverse topics such as parenting skills, children’s learning styles, nutrition, child rights, the importance of play and many more. She will then lead weekly community-based early childhood education sessions and will be a go-to resource for other mothers in her community.

Now 21 years old, Rita got married at age 17. She explains that her father died when she was in the fourth grade, forcing her to drop out of school to work on a small farm along with her mother and six siblings. This was the only way for the family to survive. She talks about the hardships of being a mother in a part of the world where women have little opportunity for education or work.

When asked why she wanted to be a guide mother, she lights up. Her answer is simple: “A better future for my children, so that they have chances that I never had. I want them to get an education and get whatever job they want.” She goes on to explain how important it is for her to learn and be a good model for her children, saying, “I didn’t get a chance to study, so this is also my turn to learn.”

With her 1-year-old daughter, Jocelyn, wrapped to her back with a perraje, a woven shawl, Rita stands in front of 15 eager children ready to play and learn. One of them is her 4-year-old son, Sebastian. Rita leads the class of 3- to 5-year-olds through various singing and coloring exercises, which translates into language acquisition and fine motor skills development. A smile of relief spreads across Rita’s face as the class ends and she knows that this session, the first of many more to come, has been a huge success.

Through ChildFund’s guide mother program, Rita is both the student and the teacher.

Waiting and Watching: A Volcano Threatens Eruption in Ecuador

Reporting and video by ChildFund Ecuador staff

With its snow-capped peak jutting into the Ecuadorean sky, the Cotopaxi volcano is one of the highest and most famous active volcanoes in South America. Since its most recent eruption in August 2015, it has become a source of growing concern for people living in the Cotopaxi province, where ChildFund works through its local partner FEDECOX.

Currently, the volcanic activity is moderate as Cotopaxi continues to emit steam and ash, and the Ecuadorean government has placed the area on yellow alert – the lowest of three possible safety warnings. FEDECOX has distributed masks and caps to help children and families block out the ash and prevent respiratory and skin diseases. The affected communities are also conducting large drills to prepare for a possible eruption.

The volcano, known to be one of the most dangerous in the world, remains carefully watched. Cotopaxi’s glacier cover multiplies the potential for lahars, which are enormous and devastating mud- and rockslides that can race down a mountain much too fast for people to escape.

ChildFund and its local partner organizations in the area are working to ensure that children and their families are as prepared as they can be, and we remain poised to provide the special help they’ll need in case of emergency.

We will provide further updates as they become available. In the meantime, take a look at this video featuring 7-year-old Leidy, who shows us how she puts on her protective gear – with a smile and plenty of style.

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