Asia

ChildFund Volunteers Help After Volcano Eruption

Reporting by Sagita Adeswyi and Ivan Tagor, ChildFund Indonesia

In recent weeks, two volcanoes have erupted in Indonesia, displacing thousands: Mt. Sinabung, in North Sumatra, and Mt. Kelud, in East Java. Although ChildFund doesn’t offer programs in either of the affected areas, we’re nearby and ready to help as needed.

volcanic stone

Volcanic stone from Mt. Kelud

Most of the more than 5,000 families displaced by Mt. Kelud have returned to their homes, and the government has provided them with cleaning and roofing materials. However, manpower and knowhow have been in short supply.

Enter 45 ChildFund volunteers from Boyolali, in Central Java — 30 adults and 15 youth — who helped families clean their houses and fix their roofs, finishing six or seven houses each day. Three midwives traveled with the group to provide basic health care as needed for both families and the volunteers.

volcano response in Indonesia

Youth volunteers bring in roofing materials to repair homes near the Mt. Kelud volcano.

Indonesia midwife

A midwife makes sure volunteers remain healthy during their work.

roof repair

Each day, the ChildFund volunteers helped fix six or seven homes.

In Afghanistan, Women Strive for Education and Equal Rights

By Wendy Barron, ChildFund Afghanistan National Director

Saturday, March 8 is International Women’s Day, which has been observed for more than 100 years. Equal rights, education, empowerment and independence for women and girls — all over the world — are the cornerstone of the day, tenets that ChildFund supports. Mahdia, the Afghani woman interviewed here, declined to have her photo published because she was worried about her husband and male relatives’ reaction to her likeness being seen by people outside the ChildFund Afghanistan office, particularly men.

A huge smile lights up Mahdia’s face as she reads a sentence from her Dari book, which teaches phrases in the language used in Mahdia’s community.

Mahdia is one of ChildFund Afghanistan’s cleaners and, like the majority of Afghani women, she is illiterate. Two times a week, she and I sit together, as we are taken through the intricacies of the Dari language in our quest to read and write it. She has an advantage over me in that she can speak the language, but as for the rest of the tasks, we both struggle. 

For the rest of the day and ensuing days, the ever-present smile gets bigger and bigger, and there is a sense of something different about her — a confidence that is slowly uncoiling and emerging like the blooming of a flower.  

literacy classes in Afghanistan

Most Afghani women are illiterate because they did not have the opportunity to attend school. These women are studying today in a literacy course. Mahdia is not pictured.

Like Mahdia, I come from a poor background, but the difference between our somewhat parallel lives is that I was able to receive an education. Also, I was born in the country that, in 1893, became the first in the world to give women the right to vote. Today’s New Zealand women benefit from the struggle in which our mothers, grandmothers and great-grandmothers succeeded in ensuring equal opportunities for women. In fact, if you were to ask New Zealand men how they perceive the rights and opportunities for New Zealand females, they would more than likely tell you it is 60 percent/40 percent in favor of women.

Afghanistan’s women were awarded the right to vote in 1964. The new constitution established in 2004 states, “Any kind of discrimination and privilege between the citizens of Afghanistan is prohibited. The citizens of Afghanistan — whether man or woman — have equal rights and duties before the law.” But despite having the ability to vote and having a constitution that notes gender equality, the majority of Afghani women have not seen many significant improvements in their lives. Indeed, Afghanistan is recognized as being one of the most dangerous countries to be a female.

It is estimated that 75 percent of Afghani women have no education. The average lifespan of women is 49 years; 85 percent of women face, or have faced, abuse or physical violence. And Afghanistan still has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. Early marriage is extremely common as well. 

Most women and girls face precarious prospects in a highly fragile environment buffeted by low economic performance and high poverty, food insecurity, as well as high levels of insecurity and exclusion on account of gender. 

As we celebrate International Women’s Day and reflect on the progress made so far in the quest to achieve equality for women and girls worldwide, we also recognize what still needs to happen.

A month after International Women’s Day, with its theme of Inspiring Change, the people of Afghanistan will head to the polls to elect a new president. As many of the presidential candidates campaign on the need to recognize the rights of women and make promises of bringing improvement to women’s lives, many Afghani women are hopeful that 2014 will be a year of positive change for both them and their country. They are calling for changes in attitudes and positive action for women’s equality; if Afghanistan is to make progress, the status quo cannot continue.

Mahdia tells me that she is doing all she can to encourage her daughters to get good educations so they can have opportunities that she has been denied. She also tells me — with that big smile lighting up her face — that they are so proud of her learning to read and write.

As I sit here in Afghanistan, I can’t help but wonder how my life may have turned out had it not been for the opportunities I have had, because I was born a female in New Zealand.

100 Days Later, Typhoon-Stricken Regions Still Need Help

One hundred days have passed since Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines, leaving 6,201 people dead and more than 1 million homes either damaged or destroyed. ChildFund has been on the ground since the immediate aftermath, assisting with food and water distribution, setting up Child-Centered Spaces and helping families rebuild homes and livelihoods. And yet, the people of Capiz, Leyte, Cebu and Bantayan islands still need your help as they try to get back on their feet. Consider making a donation to ChildFund’s Philippines Relief and Recovery Fund.

“It is a war against hunger and disease. It is a war against negative coping strategies families feel forced to adopt. It is a war against thirst, and it is a war against international news cycles and ambivalence,” says Isaac Evans, ChildFund’s director for global safety and security.

 100 days Capture

South Korea: From Aid Recipient to Donor

By Je-Hoon Lee, President, ChildFund Korea

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Korea.

75th ChildFund logoIn 1948, the seed of love and sharing was sown for Korean children who were hungry and ragged, as China’s Children Fund began operations in Korea. That seed would take root and grow to become ChildFund Korea.

At the program’s beginning, 400 children lived in three orphanages started by Verent J. Mills, who was then CCF’s overseas director and later became executive director of the renamed Christian Children’s Fund. This support expanded during and after the Korean War, which raged from 1950 to 1953.

Dr. Mills in Korea

Dr. Verent Mills at a Korean orphanage in the 1950s.

During the period of political and social chaos before and during the war, CCF levied financial and human resources to rescue Korean children. In this age of instability, CCF did not leave the frontlines of child welfare but did its work quietly. For the next 38 years, CCF supported about 100,000 Korean children, allocating approximately $1 billion. Not only did the organization help war orphans at the beginning of its work, but it also helped children who were living at home with their parents.

In 1986, the Korean branch became independent from CCF because of high economic growth in the country, allowing it to become self-sustaining. The end of CCF’s economic support carries an important historical meaning in Korea’s development of child welfare. Since 1986, ChildFund Korea has been constantly changing and progressing as a nonprofit organization, providing sponsorship, foster care and child protection, as well as other necessary services for communities and families.   

With support from international organizations and the strong will and effort of Koreans, Korea has accomplished great economic growth. In the 1990s, Koreans formed a social consensus to help children in developing countries, prompting ChildFund Korea to work globally. Starting with Cambodia, Vietnam and Sri Lanka, we have supported children and families in 21 countries around the world since 1995.

South Sudan

ChildFund Korea President Je-Hoon Lee spends time with children in South Sudan.

To return the love and help that we have received at difficult times, ChildFund Korea took a further step by opening offices in South Sudan and North Korea. ChildFund Korea provided North Korean children with hygiene kits, nutritional food and clothing and built a bakery in Pyongyang that produced 10,000 loaves of bread every day from 2005 to 2009. Also, ChildFund Korea supported health care programs to reduce disease and improve the health of children in North Korea, and we continue to provide various services when possible.

During our global expansion, ChildFund Korea’s domestic programs shifted direction as well, adapting to changes in need and the social environment. As reported cases of physical and sexual violence against children increased, ChildFund Korea adapted the Child Assault Program from the United States and trained 259,559 students, teachers and parents at 600 schools, a total of 10,151 training sessions. So far, 603 CAP teachers have been certified.  

ChildFund Korea's Youngjin Park in Senegal.

ChildFund Korea’s Youngjin Park in Senegal.

In 2011, ChildFund Korea started an advocacy campaign called Nayoung’s Wish, named for a girl who lives with a disability after a sexual assault at the age of 8. ChildFund Korea submitted about 500,000 signatures to South Korea’s congress to promote the abolishment of the statute of limitations for sex crimes against minors and the disabled, which was pending in court at the time.

Finally, the statute was changed. ChildFund Korea has built on this success and is engaged in other advocacy campaigns related to school violence, bullying and child protection.

As we reach our own 65th anniversary, ChildFund Korea allocates more than 130 billion won (US$121 million) a year to support children, and we have more than 240,000 sponsors, 1,100 staff members and 70 program offices. ChildFund Korea has helped Koreans to be active participants in assisting children living in poverty and has strengthened the motivation of Koreans to support global programs, carrying on the legacy of Christian Children’s Fund.

We are honored to be a valuable member of Korean NGOs that emerged as donors after a time of being recipients of aid.

Ghana

Jung-eun Ok of ChildFund Korea plays with children in Ghana.

A Report From the Philippines

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As part of our 75th anniversary blog series, we take a look at ChildFund’s long history with the Philippines, as captured in a 1959 letter by Dr. Verent Mills.

75th ChildFund logoChina’s Children Fund continued to grow throughout World War II, assisting 45 orphanages by November 1944, only six years after CCF was started. At the end of the war in 1945, CCF founder Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke saw that the organization’s income exceeded the known needs in China. That’s when CCF began its work in other Asian countries, including today’s focus, the Philippines.

We began sending funds to orphanages in the Philippines in 1946 (in fact, on Feb. 7, our board voted to help Filipino children), and we still support children in the Philippines, with everyday needs and when disasters strike, including Typhoon Haiyan, which claimed thousands of lives and destroyed homes and livelihoods for millions.

historic Philippines

A local garden in the Philippines, circa 1970s.

Our support for children in the Philippines has deep roots. In August 1959, Dr. Verent Mills, who was then Christian Children’s Fund overseas director, wrote to Dr. Clarke from Manila during a visit to a cottage-style orphanage, Children’s Garden:

“Mrs. Pangindian and others were at the airport and we drove by the Methodist Church to pick up Dr. Mosebrook, who returned to Manila just two weeks ago. Then on out in the rain to Children’s Garden, where the little ones sang a song of welcome. The whole place looks so neat and clean and the shrubbery and flowers are beautiful. Everything is always kept in tip-top shape here and the children appear very happy. The same cottage mothers are there and they are very proud of their children.

1977 philippines

Local women display their handcraft work, one of our Philippines projects in 1977.

The new clinic and sickbay is near completion and will be quite an asset to them, for it is difficult to segregate the ill children in the cottages. As soon as the weather changes they intend to build the other cottage.

Dr. Perez, who sends her special greetings to you both, stated that as time goes on the needs are becoming more pressing than ever, due to inflation, and the cost of living is going up constantly. … There is more unemployment than ever and market prices of everyday commodities continue to rise daily.”

 Mills continues, “The relatives of many of the children we are helping are very grateful. Likewise, the local citizens are rallying around the project and helping equally as much as we are giving.  If Voluntary Agencies only had the wherewithal to do more we could accomplish so much good and create more goodwill between other countries and our own.”

undated Philippines photo

Many children remained in poverty and were on a waiting list for our Philippines orphanages in the 1950s.

In closing, Mills writes that there are more than 200 children on the waiting list for Children’s Garden and that Dr. Perez hopes that in 1960, the orphanage could take in some of these children if they can build three more cottages.

“Also Dr. Mosebrook has asked me if he can raise locally for building an additional cottage. Would we take on the support of the children at $10.00 per month? I told him we would. I thought it would be an encouragement and an incentive. Children’s Garden in the Philippines is but one of our many Homes of which we can be justly proud.”

Afghanistan: Lights for Learning On the Move

Kuchi girls in Afghanistan

Only 2 percent of girls and women in the nomadic Kuchi tribe are literate.

By ChildFund Staff

ChildFund and Nokero International, Ltd. have partnered to expand educational opportunity to 1,200 girls and 800 boys from a nomadic tribe in northern Afghanistan.

Our first effort with Nokero, in 2012, was to provide safe, inexpensive solar-powered lights to schoolchildren in Liberia. This time, we’re taking advantage of another quality of Nokero’s lights: their portability.

Kuchi tribe

Providing portable lights will help Kuchi children receive an education.

In northern Afghanistan, the nomadic Kuchi people move with the seasons, herding animals and bartering along the way. As one of Afghanistan’s most marginalized ethnic groups, they face extreme poverty and instability.

Since they settle only temporarily in rural, isolated regions, the Kuchis go months at a time without basic services like electricity and education. The literacy rate among the Kuchi men is less than 7 percent, and among women, it’s less than 2. Less than 2 percent of Kuchi girls are able to enroll in school.

This project supports a larger grant initiative to expand educational opportunities for 2,000 Kuchi children. It has two components:

625 Nokero solar-powered lamps and chargers that students can use to study, even when they’re in remote locations without electricity

peer-led study clubs that will be monitored by trained mentors and teachers so that students can continue their studies while on the move

Lights and study groups will empower children — especially girls — to sustain their learning without abandoning their nomadic way of life.

But to make this happen, we need your help to raise $8,864 by March 1 for our Fund a Project, Solar Lights and Study Clubs for Kuchi Children.

Join hands with other like-minded people and bring this project to life. And don’t forget to share the link with your family and friends.

Learning How to Count to Eight

By Isaac “Ike” Evans, ChildFund Director of Global Safety and Security 

I’ve been in the Philippines nearly a month now, supporting our emergency response to Super Typhoon Haiyan. I’ve learned a lot on this trip, but one thing I will carry with me is being able to count to eight in Cebuano. I did not learn it because I read it in a book or used language-learning software. I learned it by placing eight bags of dried noodles into larger plastic bags – hundreds and hundreds of times: Ousa, duha, tolo, opat, lima, unum, pito, walo.

The eight bags of noodles, combined with other food items, were enough to feed a family of five for five days.

Ike Evans

There’s Ike (right), packing food in Cebu City.

The other day, I went to Sacred Heart Church here in Cebu, where staff and volunteers have been packing food and non-food items nearly every day for the last month. I’ve stopped in before, but this time I wanted to thank them and help with packing, to experience what they were doing for us. Of course, I had no idea what I was in for. The labor – packing and moving combined food items weighing about 90 kilos (200 lb.) – is especially tough here, where the temperature and humidity are high. Sheets of sweat ran down my face within minutes.  

My colleagues, Joel and Martin, were with me that day, and after an hour or so of heavy lifting, we settled into other work: packing rice, sardines or noodles into the bags. Eventually we found our niche, taking noodles from boxes (thousands of boxes!) and placing eight bags into a small plastic bag. Joel and I worked as a team – as a machine, really – while Martin packed canned sardines into other bags. We were moving quickly, so we counted aloud to make sure we were putting the right number in each bag.

Joel soon fell into his native Cebuano, and a game of sorts was afoot. Soon enough, I would learn to count in Cebuano, but only to eight. There were many laughs as I tried to first remember, then sound the words out and slowly develop mastery. After a couple of hours, Martin said it was time for me to go; the others had already worked well past quitting time but would not leave as long as I was there.

Sorry and a bit embarrassed, I got up slowly. The work was harder and more monotonous and dirtier than I had thought. But now I can count to eight in Cebuano, and the story of how I learned to do it is one more memory that helps restore me when the work of providing relief gets me down.

food packing in Cebu City

ChildFund’s food packs, assembled at a church in Cebu City, fed hundreds of families in the Philippines.

You Helped Make Dreams Come True

India Dream Bikes

Thank you for helping us reach our goal in providing 1,000 Dream Bikes to girls in India and Sri Lanka. Here, two girls take a ride in Khireshwer, India. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Sara Woznicki, ChildFund Digital Marketing Specialist

As you may have noticed during the past few months, we have encouraged ChildFund supporters to purchase bikes as part of our Dream Bikes program. Girls in Sri Lanka and India face long walks to school, as well as attendant danger and exhaustion. Bicycles make a real difference.

And now, 1,000 girls will have their wheels, thanks to the generosity of our donors. We cannot thank you enough. We could not be prouder of everyone that contributed to this campaign, which began in September. Together, we raised enough money to provide 1,000 girls with bikes in less than 140 days. That’s about seven bikes a day!

Maybe you clicked onto our website and saw the video of Hirabai on her bicycle. Or you were scanning through Facebook and saw our posts about Dream Bikes on Giving Tuesday in December. However you found out about our Dream Bike campaign, we are so happy that you did — and that you took action to help a girl stay in school.

Thank you to everyone who helped us to reach our goal in record time, but more importantly, thank you for changing 1,000 girls’ lives and giving them the opportunity to finish their education, which they might have had to otherwise forego.

If you missed our Dream Bikes campaign, don’t worry. You can still contribute $100 and help change a life. Because you know what’s better than giving 1,000 bicycles? Giving 2,000!

Love for Children Reaches Beyond Frontiers

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Japan.

By Takeshi Kobayashi, Executive Director, ChildFund Japan 

75th ChildFund logoLove reaches beyond national borders, as we know. In 1948, 65 years ago, when our grandparents were in their youth, Christian Children’s Fund (then known as China’s Children Fund) began assisting children in Japan, where postwar confusion continued. The situation of child-care institutions in Japan at that time was desperately severe. Most of the institutions could not provide children with nutritious food or clothes.

From Postwar Beginnings

The 1940s was a very difficult decade for Japan. There was World War II, and at its end in 1945, the country was in ruins. Many children lost their guardians and relatives. They were literally children living in the streets. CCF brought the love of people in the United States to these destitute Japanese children. CCF demonstrated that love can reach beyond international borders and save suffering children.

The Christian Child Welfare Association was established in 1952 with management assistance from CCF. One piece in a book called “Love Beyond the Frontier” about CCWA’s history attracted my attention. It was written by the director of a child care institution taking care of war orphans after World War II:

“In September of 1949, I received a notice that my institution would soon receive the first subsidy from CCF. Under the very difficult situation which we were in, this was a blessing shower from God. All the workers together with children, remembering sponsors of U.S., offered thanks giving prayers to God. With this donation, we were able to provide children with supplemental food, additional clothes and educational materials.” 

 

CCF Japan

A historical photo depicts a child-care center run by Christian Children’s Fund in Japan.

Assistance for Japan Meaningful in Several Ways

Japan was among the first recipients of CCF’s assistance. Moreover, ChildFund Japan is the first country office that became independent from Christian Children’s Fund in 1974, and in 1975, we started assisting marginalized children in the Philippines.

In 2005, we made an important decision to disunite from the Christian Child Welfare Association to focus on international development cooperation, although CCWA continues to serve children here in Japan. At that time, we joined the ChildFund Alliance as the 12th member organization. We were able to expand our assistance to children in Sri Lanka in 2006 in collaboration with ChildFund International, and in 2010, we began assisting children in Nepal through the sponsorship program. 

Sri Lanka

Takeshi Kobayashi with children in Sri Lanka during a recent visit.

As I look back, ChildFund Japan indeed demonstrates love beyond frontiers. Love that reaches beyond national borders is essential for assisting children in need around the world.

ChildFund’s Year in Review

 

Typhoon Haiyan aid

Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines in November, was the strongest storm to hit the region in many years. ChildFund has worked to get resources to the affected communities since the storm hit.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

When I think of 2013, I see great waves of floodwater. Over the past year, a typhoon and a cyclone struck communities in India and the Philippines, causing great devastation to families we serve, as well as our local partner organizations and national office staff. Yet these disasters also gave us the opportunity to show the best of our human spirit, whether it was through donations or assistance on the ground.

Here’s a look back at some of ChildFund’s highlights in 2013.

cyclone Phailin

Houses in Bhubaneswar, India, were deluged with floodwater in October, when Cyclone Phailin struck.

In November, Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm to hit the Philippines in many years, blew through several communities that ChildFund serves. Nationwide, more than 6,000 people died, and 550,000 homes were destroyed. We are still collecting donations to help those who lost their homes and belongings, as well as giving psychosocial support to children and families who were traumatized by the storm’s destruction.  In October, Cyclone Phailin struck eastern India, causing massive flooding and the destruction of homes and more than a million acres of farmland.  Our support there continues.

Our work against exploitative child labor took center stage in mid-June, when we recognized World Day Against Child Labor. We learned how child labor takes many forms, whether it’s in a sugarcane field, a mine or inside the home; sometimes, it’s hard to tell when children and youth are being exploited because of the secrecy surrounding the practice. In fact, a poll we commissioned in June revealed that 73 of Americans surveyed believe that only 1 million children are working in exploitative conditions. Wrong: The actual number is closer to 150 million. It’s important to pay attention to the signs and to make efforts to support industries that are taking a stand against child labor. ChildFund Alliance also launched the Free From Violence and Exploitation petition this year, aiming to make child protection a priority in the United Nations’ post-2015 goals.

child labor

Child labor is a serious problem in many of the countries where ChildFund works, such as Bolivia, where this boy shines shoes.

In November, the Alliance released the results of its Small Voices, Big Dreams children’s survey, asking children what they would do if they were president of their countries, as well as what they consider the most important issues of the day. As usual, children gave wise and considered responses to our questions.

In September, ChildFund began marking its 75th anniversary, a landmark that our national offices, Alliance members and international office have recognized with numerous events, including meetings and celebrations with staff members, our Alliance countries, board members and, of course, sponsored children. Our 75-post anniversary blog series, which shares historical photos and stories — as well as the views of sponsors, children, Alliance members and staff — continues through the end of March.

As we take a look back at the past, we employ our history to lend perspective to ChildFund’s work and to help determine our future goals. Just as our founder, Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke, declared in October 1938, the well-being of children in need remains at the heart of ChildFund. Thank you for your past and present support, and have a happy and healthy 2014!

Kenya in 1988

A photo from our archives depicts our Kenya operations in 1988.

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