Asia

Choosing a Winner of ChildFund’s Community Video Contest

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

At the end of the year in the San Francisco Bay area, where I live, the lines to buy cinema tickets are as long as the waits to see Santa. We’re not only at theaters for Hollywood’s latest blockbusters; this is home to more than 50 annual film festivals. Screenings of documentaries, experimental films and cinema from all around the world routinely sell out.

This year, between Christmas and New Year’s, I had a film festival of my very own as I took one last look at entries from ChildFund’s second annual community video challenge: 35 short films, each telling the story of a child’s success. In 2015 our contestants represented 12 countries across all three regions where we work: Africa, the Americas and Asia.

Despite shoestring budgets and novice filmmakers – sponsored children among them – these videos share many qualities with the competition at the Golden Globes and Academy Awards. And for pure authenticity, they beat the professionals hands down.

What makes a winning video? While technical aspects like camera steadiness, smooth transitions and spell-checked captions can certainly make a difference, the best videos tell a story. We all make sense of our experiences through stories. And the most human stories tell of young heroes who, with help from wise adults, overcame enormous odds to achieve their dreams.

Stories develop their characters, present conflicts, portray life’s trajectories and appeal to the audience’s awe, excitement or amusement. They also are, above all, authentic. That’s a lot to accomplish in less than 3 minutes, the limit given our contestants.

Each year, our winners receive small cash awards to help with the purchase of training or equipment, including cameras, tripods, microphones and video-editing products.

In 2015, our judges came from ChildFund’s global communications and sponsorship divisions.

Just as folks don’t always agree with the outcomes of the Oscars, we weren’t unanimous in our choices. But we were all captivated by a video from La Paz, Bolivia, which showed us how a young woman named Andreina rose above her circumstances and is helping others. Rather than filming a traditional video, her community gathered a series of photos documenting her daily activities, adding captions and a soundtrack that made us feel as if we were in the middle of her life.

Here are the best of our 2015 video submissions. Congratulations, and thanks to everyone who entered.

Also, watch the 2014 community video winner from Zambia, featuring 10-year-old Tinashe.

Learn More About Your Child’s Country

family in Sri Lanka

“I like to help my mother to fetch water,” says Kimuna, 8, of Sri Lanka. Photo by Himangi Jayasundere, ChildFund Sri Lanka.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Maybe you’re a new sponsor or a supporter of ChildFund’s programs. Or maybe you’ve been with us a while but want to know more about the country where your sponsored child lives.

You have options! ChildFund’s digital team recently redesigned the Stories & News section of our website, where you can find interviews and pictures of sponsored children, their family members, ChildFund alumni and more. We also have current articles about issues affecting people in the communities where we work, including Ethiopia’s food shortage, early marriage and preparing for natural disasters. Once you’ve looked through the story files, you may want to know even more, which is where our Knowledge Center comes in handy. Publications, research and financial reports are all housed there, going back several years. Thanks for being part of ChildFund’s family, and let’s all have a happy new year!

 

Memorable Images of 2015

These are some of 2015’s most memorable photos taken by ChildFund staff members, local partner organizations’ employees and others — most notably Jake Lyell, a Richmond, Virginia-based photographer and videographer who lived for several years in Uganda and has traveled to numerous countries, including disaster zones, to provide ChildFund with video and photo documentation of our work. We appreciate everyone’s efforts. Read about some of the year’s most memorable people and stories here. Also, learn more about why people sponsor children and how it affects communities and families.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

2015 Highlights: Fighting Ebola, Speaking Out Against Violence

Timor-Leste Children against Violence

Student participants in Timor-Leste’s Children Against Violence program take flight! 

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

As editor of ChildFund’s blog, I’m taking a look back at a few of the past year’s highlights that reflect the triumphs and struggles in communities where we work. See some of the year’s most memorable photos here.

As 2015 began, ChildFund staff members and local partner organizations were fully engaged in starting and running Interim Care Centers (ICCs) in Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the worst recorded outbreak of Ebola was killing thousands and leaving children orphaned and vulnerable to neglect, sickness and abuse.

ChildFund’s ICCs — staffed by survivors of Ebola, in many cases — helped children who had lost parents and other caregivers by giving them safe spaces to stay during the required 21-day quarantine period while they were observed for symptoms. The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone recently recognized ChildFund’s work to educate children and family members and protect them from the further spread of Ebola.

Facinet Bangoura

Facinet Bangoura

This year, we’ve heard many personal stories of survivors and children touched by the deadly virus. You can read many of them here, but Arthur Tokpah’s interview with Ebola survivor Facinet Bangoura was particularly memorable for me. A young man from Guinea, Facinet contracted Ebola after performing traditional burial rituals for a relative who had died from the virus. He survived, but he explained to us how misinformation led many friends to shun him after he returned to his community. Today, Facinet is on a mission to prevent a further outbreak of Ebola.

Another of ChildFund’s heroes is Flavia Lanuedoc, a longtime staff member of our local partner organization in Dominica, which was hit with massive floods in August. A couple of months later, she shared with us her personal struggle after her house had been cut off from the mainland. Read how Flavia managed to do her job amid great adversity.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

Debbie Gautreau and Momodou Bah.

We also can’t forget Momodou Bah, the ChildFund alumnus from The Gambia who is now his nation’s youngest elected official and a 2015 Mandela Washington Fellow, an honor bestowed on young African leaders annually by the White House. Momodou is a remarkable person who is doing a lot of good in his country, despite impoverished beginnings, and now he is back in contact with his former sponsor, Debbie Gautreau.

I also want to pay tribute to all of the people — especially the youngest ones — who spoke up about violence and the importance of giving children safe schools, homes and neighborhoods so they can grow up and achieve their potential. Their numbers are great, and some spoke out in spite of personal risk. Children performing short dramas about corporal abuse in Timor-Leste, a Brazilian girl traveling thousands of miles to speak about violence at a U.N. panel, Bolivian teens drawing maps where gang activity occurs in their community, children across Africa marching against forced marriage — all are examples of amazing commitment that demand respect and attention.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

Maria Antonia at the U.N.

On a global level, ChildFund Alliance’s Free From Violence campaign joined the voices of many people and organizations worldwide to advocate for the United Nations’ inclusion of a measure to end violence against children in its post-2015 agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals. This effort was successful, as child protection was prominently included in several goals adopted in September. We all hope to see a great deal of progress over the next 15 years and are ready to pitch in wherever we can.

Thank you for your support during 2015, and we wish you a wonderful new year.

The Power of a Baby Goat

Video by Jake Lyell

Each year, goats are one of our top gifts among donors, because they are easy to give and bring such joy to children and their family members. Watch what a difference a (very cute) baby goat and its brothers and sisters have made in the lives of Perina and her grandmother Alidessa, who live in Zambia. Then, you can make a difference for a family in Ethiopia, The Gambia, Guinea, Indonesia, Kenya, Liberia, Mozambique, the Philippines, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Uganda or Zambia by giving the gift of goats.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving filled with warm thoughts and love. What are we thankful for at ChildFund? The chance to see children’s happy faces and hear their voices. Here’s a class at an elementary school in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia, singing about a garden full of pretty flowers. Please enjoy.

Small Voices, Big Thoughts

La Paz, Bolivia

Nestor, 11, lives in La Paz, Bolivia. “I think it is important to listen to children’s voices,” he says. “Boys without love grow to be aggressive. Parents’ love is important for children. It gives them more security and self-confidence.”

Reporting by ChildFund International staff members

Today is Universal Children’s Day, when ChildFund Alliance releases its annual Small Voices, Big Dreams survey. Almost 6,000 children in 44 countries (in the Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia) answered questions about what their fears are, what they’d do if they were their country’s leader and what they consider their rights. Here are some memorable responses from children in countries where ChildFund works. Also, learn more about how sponsorship helps children gain confidence.

Hoan of Vietnam

Hoan, 12, of Vietnam:

Adults mistreat children who are alone. Because some children do not have anyone who cares for them and protects them, adults mistreat them. I will create a safe environment for children so they can live safely and happily. I will open a free school for orphaned children who didn’t have the opportunity to go to school before.

 

Teresa of Mexico

Teresa with her younger siblings.

Teresa, 12, of Mexico:

There are parents who always tell their kids that they are not capable of doing certain things, and I think that is really wrong because we feel a lot of pressure, and over time, we’ll be afraid of expressing ourselves.

 

 

 

 

Jeferino of Timor-Leste

Jeferino, 12, of Timor-Leste:

We are children. We also have the right to play, but most of the adults limit us. When we play, they come to chase us away because they are adults, and we are children. And we can’t do anything.

Agnes, 12, of Zambia:

If I become a leader, I will make sure everyone knows and protects children’s rights.

Agnes gathers maize for her family.

Agnes gathers maize for her family.

 

Jonathan of Mexico

Jonathan, outside his home.

Jonathan, 11, of Mexico:

I think it is really important to listen to children’s opinions because people shouldn’t make decisions for them or force them to do anything.

Today Is World Toilet Day

Did you know that 2.4 billion people do not have access to basic toilets? That number includes some of the children and family members ChildFund works with in Africa, Asia and the Americas. When families don’t have clean and safe bathroom facilities, children become vulnerable to disease and malnutrition. Nov. 19 is World Toilet Day, and we’re asking for your help in sharing information about the lack of good sanitation in communities around the world. This video from Cambodia shows how a simple latrine has made a dramatic difference in 11-year-old Romduol’s life. If you share the video with your circle of friends and loved ones, use the World Toilet Day hashtag, #WeCantWait.

 

Lighting Up the Future of Children in India

RS31327_Aarathi-lpr

ChildFund India distributed solar-powered lanterns to children. Here, Aarathi reads by its light.

By Rashmi Kulkarni, ChildFund India

In parts of India, literacy rates are very low for a variety of reasons. One problem is a lack of electricity. When you are in the dark at home, it’s not easy to read.

In June, ChildFund India distributed nearly 40,000 solar-powered lamps to children in homes without electricity, as phase two of a national literacy campaign called Books, My Friends. In December 2014, our India staff members, with the help of local partner organizations and others, distributed 40,000 tote bags full of age-appropriate books in several languages. About 115,000 children have benefited from the program, which aims to make reading fun and also help them improve their literacy skills.

According to India’s Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) for 2014, many children are behind grade level in their reading skills. Among eighth-graders, about 75 percent can read at second-grade level, and 32.5 percent of second-graders can’t even recognize letters.

We used to use wax or kerosene candles. With the slightest blow of wind, the candles would go out.

In this campaign phase, called Toward a Brighter Future, children have received solar-powered lamps that allow them to read, do homework or other activities after the sun goes down.

“For me, my education is very important,” says Aarathi, who got a lamp. “I don’t like missing school even for a single day. Now that I have my own solar lamp, I can study anytime and anywhere. It’s so convenient and easy to use these solar lamps. We also use these lamps for doing group studies outside our houses.”

Although the lamps’ primary purpose is to help children study after dark, they also make it easier for family members to do household chores. “Earlier we used to use wax or kerosene candles,” recalls Jayamma. “With the slightest blow of wind, the candles would go out. We also used to feel hot while using them. Having a solar lamp is great. We don’t face any of those problems with this. My mother finds it very convenient to cook using this lamp.”

And for some, the solar lamp has a totally different benefit. “Now we can also play after dark outside our houses using these lamps,” say Prathibha and Swathi.

After the successful implementation of this second phase, ChildFund India plans to open two solar-powered model schools, more than 100 libraries in rural schools in 14 states and introduce mobile libraries, which will provide access to high-quality reading material and dedicated reading space for children and other community members.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,063 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter