Asia

Assessing and Responding to Devastation in the Philippines

Reporting by ChildFund Philippines staff

As we begin to understand the scope of Typhoon Haiyan’s toll on the Philippines, ChildFund staff members and our local partner organizations are in the devastated communities, distributing aid and assessing needs. You can assist by making a donation to our Philippines Relief and Recovery Fund. Here is the most recent report from our Philippines colleagues:

ChildFund has started to implement its emergency response in these priority areas: Ormoc City, Roxas City and Tacloban City. An operations center has been established in Cebu City as the staging point for logistics and personnel deployment to Tacloban and other Eastern Visayas provinces. Procurement of relief goods (food packs and non-food items) is ongoing simultaneously in Manila and Cebu City.

Below is a summary of the results of the rapid assessment done by our staff on the field:

damage in Ormoc City

Ormoc City was one of the most devastated localities in the Philippines. ChildFund was among the first aid organizations to reach the city.

Ormoc City, Leyte: The entire population of about 100,000 families has been affected. Food and potable water are their most urgent needs. Only 35 of the 110 barangays (districts) have received food packs, which are good for two days only. There are no local suppliers. There is also no electricity. Although there is a water supply, not all water is potable. At this time, 90 percent of roads and bridges are passable. Public buildings have sustained major damage. The local government can arrange for the transportation to deliver supplies from Cebu City.

Our local partner has accounted for all 271 enrolled children. Most of them have damaged houses. Meanwhile, the office of our local partner is severely damaged.

Roxas City, Capiz: The entire city sustained heavy damage from the typhoon, affecting 12,123 people, or 2,499 households. Nearly 5,000 children are affected. More than 10,000 people have left their homes and are currently living with relatives, in makeshift tents or at designated evacuation centers. ChildFund staff has determined the presence of 450 families in 20 evacuation centers. There is no electricity in the entire city, but cell phone network coverage has been restored. There is a potable water supply, but it is running low. 

phones recharging

Cell phones recharging in Ormoc.

ChildFund operates in 13 of the 47 barangays in Roxas City. ChildFund is in close coordination with the city’s Social Welfare and Development Office.  So far, ChildFund is the only nongovernmental organization present in the area. ChildFund has initially distributed 200 units of 6-liter bottled water. Food and non-food items are still being packaged and will be ready for distribution shortly. The staff is in the process of setting up a Child-Centered Space in Culasi, one of the hardest hit barangays. The staff members have conducted a preliminary session for 30 children. More sessions will take place in the following days.

Iloilo City, Iloilio: Our local partner has initially conducted activities for children and distributed 200 units of bottled water at one evacuation center. Based on the assessment of the ChildFund team, the municipality of Estancia is being recommended as another area for response since it is the hardest-hit municipality in the province.

distributing water

Distributing water in Ormoc City.

Tacloban City, Leyte: Its population of 220,000 people bore the brunt of the typhoon, with the death toll being placed so far at 1,774 by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. There are 13 evacuation centers hosting about 15,000 people.  Although we do not have programs in Tacloban, ChildFund has an assessment team standing by.

Toboso, Negros Occidental: All barangays of this municipality were affected. Some 1,256 families or 5,213 people are in evacuation centers. There is no electricity in the municipality, and it most likely will not be restored until December. Food and non-food items are the priority needs.

ChildFund Philippines

ChildFund Philippines staff members meet at the national office to prepare their response to the typhoon.

ChildFund is coordinating with the Social Welfare Office and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. So far, ChildFund is the only organization coordinating with the local government unit, which can provide transportation for the relief goods. Community Watch groups, barangay officials and teachers also can be mobilized for relief operations.

San Carlos City, Negros Occidental: ChildFund works in six of the 17 barangays in San Carlos. The entire city, home to more than 13,000 people, was affected. The local government, which through the Social Welfare office provided relief goods in the evacuation centers during the typhoon, now is giving priority only to families whose houses are totally damaged. There is no electricity. Food and non-food items (mats, blankets, mosquito nets) are needed. ChildFund is coordinating with the Social Welfare Office and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

Bacolod City, Negros Occidental: No reports of storm damage. Our local partner has accounted for the 2,560 enrolled children in Roxas City, Iloilo and Bacolod.

Typhoon Haiyan Update: Response Begins in Hardest-Hit Areas

typhoon devastation in Philippines

Residents walk on a road littered with debris after Super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban City. REUTERS/Erik De Castro, courtesy Trust.org

ChildFund, along with our partners in the ChildFund Alliance, has launched an appeal for $10 million for immediate relief and long-term recovery for children and families affected by Typhoon Haiyan, which slammed into the Philippines over the weekend.

We have identified three priority areas for our emergency response efforts: Ormoc City and Roxas City, where we have programs and sponsored children, and Tacloban City, a non-program area that is also identified by United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination as among the hardest-hit localities.

Our immediate goals:

Establish Child-Centered Spaces in Ormoc, Roxas and Tacloban – two centers in each city.

Distribute food packs (rice, noodles and canned goods) for 3,000 families.

Distribute non-food items (bath soap, children’s underwear, sanitary supplies, baby diapers and laundry soap) to 3,000 families.

The contents of the food packs are based on government recommendations for relief items. For the non-food items, ChildFund chose a selection of basic necessities to fill gaps in the standard packs provided by the government and other entities, thereby getting a broader selection of essentials to families. 

We are also in the process of setting up an operations center in Cebu, which has been declared by the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs to be the staging point for any logistics and personnel going to Tacloban and other eastern provinces. Cebu is the closest city to the hard-hit areas, and we have approval from a university to use a large space in its complex for staging.

typhoon devastation in Philippines

Tacloban City is one of the hardest-hit localities. REUTERS/Erik De Castro, courtesy of Trust.org

Updates on ChildFund-Supported Communities

Iloilo: ChildFund’s local partner organization there is providing support to an evacuation center in the city. The local government has declared a state of calamity and is seeking help from nongovernmental organizations. The local partner plans to establish a Child-Centered Space and distribute bottled water and food packs.

Ormoc: We have yet to reconnect communications with our local partner in Ormoc City. Many towns and communities in Leyte province still cannot be reached.  A small response team is seeking to reach the area by ferry, but security is a high concern. Ormoc remains largely unreached by relief efforts.

Negros Occidental: Our local partner with the Child Labor Project in Negros is still assessing damage and accounting for children and families. The community has been declared a disaster area, with immediate needs for food and shelter. Our local partner is coordinating with the Provincial Department of Social Welfare and Development to address these needs.

Bacolod City: No reports of storm damage.

Update on Vietnam

Typhoon Haiyan weakened to a tropical depression on Monday as it crossed into Vietnam. Based on initial reports, no significant damage was expected in the inland communities where ChildFund works. These program areas include Bac Kan, Hoa Binh and Cao Bang, and they are located in the remote, mountainous regions of the north. There have been reports of strong winds and rain in coastal areas, and some damage to trees and rooftops in Hanoi, where schools have been closed. We will continue to monitor the situation closely.

You can help families in the Philippines with a donation to our Emergency Action Fund, and this video featuring Philippines National Director Katherine Manik has up-to-date information about what ChildFund is doing to help families in typhoon-stricken areas:

Taiwan’s Journey to Self-Reliance and Outreach to Other Countries

By Betty Ho, CEO of Taiwan Fund for Children and Families

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Taiwan.

75th ChildFund logoTo help homeless Chinese children after the Sino-Japanese war, Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke, a Presbyterian minister, established the China’s Children Fund in 1938 in Richmond, Va., which would later become Christian Children’s Fund. CCF began assisting orphans, children and families in Taiwan in 1950, bringing nutritional, health and educational services to an impoverished population. In 1964, the CCF Taiwan field office was formally established, and 23 Family Helper Projects were set up to provide services to children and families in need.

In 1985, Chinese Children’s Fund/Taiwan became fully independent from Christian Children’s Fund after the eight-year Self-Reliant Plan implemented by our CEO, Charles Kuo. Two years later, CCF/Taiwan started to provide sponsorships for children in foreign countries, and in Taiwan, we started our Child Protection Program. 

Betty Ho with children

Betty Ho (right) with two children in Taiwan’s programs.

In 2002, we changed our name to Taiwan Fund for Children and Families. TFCF is a nonprofit organization entrusted by the government and supported by the public for more than 63 years, when Christian Children’s Fund entered the country. In the early 2000s, we also recognized that it was time for TFCF to extend a helping hand to children in need outside of Taiwan. We established a branch office in Mongolia in 2004, and the Kyrgyzstan and Swaziland branch offices were respectively established in 2012 and 2013. We also cooperated with local nongovernmental organizations to provide community programs in 2011 in China’s Shaan Xi Province.

Here’s an overview of TFCF’s programs:

Domestic Children Sponsorship

Supporting children in need is our commitment to society. This program applies the sponsorship system to provide children from low-income families with monthly subsidies and opportunities to continue their education. The program also aims to empower sponsored children and their families to pursue their independence. Over the past 63 years, we have helped 180,243 children become self-reliant.

Foreign Children Sponsorship

Kyrgyzstan

Betty (second from left) with Taiwan board members and children in Kyrgyzstan.

We aim to assist foreign children and families in need through our collaboration with the ChildFund Alliance. Projects and programs have been designed with a focus on children’s needs, such as the nurturing, medication, academic assistance and vocational training. TFCF also cares about establishing a functional and constructive community to effectively help local residents.

Child Protection Program

This program is designated to help children who have suffered physical, sexual or mental abuse or were seriously neglected. We have provided these children with rehabilitation and placement services since 1988. To raise public awareness and provide education on child protection issues, we set up the first Child Protection Resource Center in Taiwan in April 1998.

Early Intervention Program

Taiwan board and staff

Staff and board members from Taiwan.

To better assist developmentally delayed children or those living with other disabilities, we started the Early Intervention Program in 1996 to provide counseling, day care, referrals and other resources for affected families.

Foster Care Program

We initiated our foster care program in 1983, a program offered to children who are abused or unable to be cared for by their families.

Our dream is for all children to live in a happy and sound environment, and we are pleased to join with the ChildFund Alliance to be a global force for children in need. 

Super Typhoon Haiyan Strikes Philippines

ChildFund is closely following the path and impact of Super Typhoon Haiyan (also known as Yolanda), which made landfall in Leyte, in the Philippines, Nov. 8, and is pushing west-northwest over the northern tip of Cebu Island in the Visayas as it makes it way to the South China Sea. Nearly 13 million people could potentially be affected by the storm.

Haiyan is currently packing 268 kph (166 mph) winds, making it the strongest typhoon to take aim at the Philippines all year. Meteorologists describe Haiyan as more powerful than last December’s Typhoon Bopha, which leveled villages in Mindanao, flattening homes and trees alike.

National and local government authorities began making emergency preparations earlier this week, and communities identified as directly in the typhoon’s path were issued pre-emptive evacuation warnings. Nearly a million people evacuated as the storm bore down on the islands.

ChildFund is participating in coordinated response and needs-assessment planning with the government and other NGOs. We are coordinating closely with our local partner organizations in potentially affected areas. Emergency response teams prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. We are also preparing for the setup of Child Centered Spaces in the storm’s aftermath so that children will have a safe haven.

View this video update from Katherine Manik, national director for ChildFund Philippines.

 

 

A Focus on the Young at Indonesia’s 75th Celebration

Reporting by ChildFund Indonesia staff; photos by Sagita Adeswyi

75th ChildFund logoOur national office in Indonesia recently celebrated ChildFund’s 75th anniversary with a party whose VIP guests were children aged 4 and 5, who benefit from our Early Childhood Development programs. We wanted to share some photos from the celebration and also let you hear from Indonesians who have received support from ChildFund.

“I see ChildFund has brought many changes to our village. Many people, young and old, are now aware and understand about children’s rights here.” – Goti, of Kalikidang, Banyumas

Indonesian children

Children attend ChildFund’s 75th anniversary party in Indonesia.

“I hope ChildFund will expand its working areas and bring many more programs for us here, especially for children on the villages.” – Idalia, of Kupang

 

Indonesian dance

Children perform a traditional dance at the celebration.

“ChildFund has just been here in Mulyodadi for four years, but the programs have really helped the poor children.” – Kuswanto, of Mulyodadi, Bantul

handwashing

Washing hands has become a habit for the children in this community.

“Through the programs supported by ChildFund, pregnant mothers and mothers with young children know better how to take care of their health and their children.” – Evi, of Wonorejo

dental checkups

Children receive dental checkups by college students at the celebration.

 

“The programs encourage community participation, thus creating ownership in the community.” – Liest Pramono, of Marga Sejahtera, Jakarta

ChildFund Indonesia staff

ChildFund Indonesia’s staff members enjoy a moment of fun while preparing for the celebration.

“I am really happy I could have better access to health services through the ChildFund-supported health post in my neighborhood. I hope ChildFund continues its program for young children here.” – Marselina, a mother of four in Kupang

Families Deal With Great Loss After Indian Cyclone

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

He had only heard about stories of big typhoons, but 11-year-old Loknath experienced a devastating storm for himself on Oct. 12, when Cyclone Phailin struck the shores of the eastern Indian state of Odisha.

Loknath, who is enrolled in ChildFund programs, was among a dozen children seeking shelter at a nearby school before the storm, which brought heavy rains and 124 mph winds, causing enormous damage to homes and farmland in Odisha and Andhra Pradesh.

cyclone damage

Loknath’s home was damaged by Cyclone Phailin in India’s Puri District.

“I was not very sure what was going to happen,” Loknath recalls. “Though there was no electricity, we had some kerosene lamps in the hall. We cooked our food inside the hall and started singing and talking to each other to pass time.

“Gradually, the wind began to blow with a moaning sound. And soon it became louder and louder. I felt as if the wind would blow the building away and we would all be thrown into the River Daya, which was just 50 meters away,” he added.

At the height of the storm, “we held each other’s hands and started praying to God for our safety till the winds weaken early in the morning,” Loknath said while staring at his broken house and a damaged rack where he used to keep his study materials and books. They were swept away in the storm.

“I don’t know how I will be able to buy all those materials,” Loknath said.

His mother, Rashmita, added that all of their belongings were either blown away or destroyed in the cyclone, and some lie scattered on the village’s roads now. However, she was thankful to the ChildFund staff for convincing them to leave the house before the cyclone arrived.

“Initially we thought that nothing would happen to our house,” she said. “But the project people came and forced us to leave the house as soon as possible. Thank God that we adhered to their advice. Otherwise, who knows what would have happened to us.”

Chabi, Loknath’s father, works hard to feed his six-member family, which includes his 65-year-old mother, whose foot was injured by a falling brick. He is now hoping for a house-repair aid fund from the Indian government, which was announced recently. 

In the villages served by ChildFund India’s local partner Nilachal Seva Pratisthan, four houses were severely damaged and others were partially damaged. The partner organization serves 724 ChildFund-enrolled children, including 484 sponsored children, in 14 villages.

boys at damaged home

Loknath (right) and his family of six have had to find new shelter after the cyclone.

Sudhansu Maharath, the partner organization’s project manager, said that he and his staff coordinated with the government to provide tarps to families whose houses were damaged, providing some protection from the elements, and helped them arrange for immediate shelter. “We are also exploring ways for some long-term measures to strengthen the communities’ livelihood means, which primarily include farming and pisciculture,” Maharath adds.

According to the latest estimate by the government and other agencies, more than 1.7 million people in 1,706 villages in Puri District were affected, and 105,000 houses have been damaged in the cyclone.

A joint team from ChildFund India and International Medical Corps have visited several villages in the district to conduct a needs assessment and are discussing long-term interventions in the region.

Families affected by natural disasters need immediate help, and ChildFund’s Emergency Action Fund allows us to act quickly when a disaster occurs in a country we serve. Please consider making a donation today.

‘I get goose bumps when I think of that night’

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

“It was past midnight. I woke up to the alarmed voice of my wife shouting, ’The house is cracking!’ We came out of our house, and it came shattering down just in front of us,” says a terrified Sangram, 45, whose thatched house collapsed on the night of Oct. 12, when Cyclone Phailin struck coastal Odisha State in India. The storm brought 124 mph winds and heavy rains.

collapsed house

Sangram in his collapsed home in Odisha’s Kendrapara District.

“Had it not been for my wife’s dreadful scream, we may not have been alive today,” adds the father of six, whose children were staying in a community center that night. “It was just a matter of few seconds when the roof collapsed after a tree in my back yard fell onto it.” The multi-purpose community center was built by ChildFund India’s local partner organization VARRAT (Voluntary Association for Rural Reconstruction & Appropriate Technology) after the 1999 cyclone that killed more than 10,000 people in Odisha, then known as Orissa.

“I am thankful to the project staff who insisted that I allow my children to go to the community center, but we decided to stay here, as I underestimated the cyclone threat,” Sangram says.

Sangram’s house in Odisha’s Kendrapara district is among the 37 homes damaged by the cyclone in the area VARRAT serves. VARRAT has 827 ChildFund-enrolled children in the region, including 621 who are sponsored. Sangram’s 15-year-old daughter Gurubari is one of the sponsored children. Fortunately, none of the children were hurt, though the houses of a few were damaged.  

cyclone

Gurubari, a 15-year-old sponsored child, lost her school books in the flood.

For Gurubari, the biggest losses after her home were her textbooks, which were washed away by floodwaters that gushed through her house after it collapsed. “I don’t have a single book left,” she says. “I don’t know whether I will be able to get another book set.”

Sangram, who is waiting for government compensation for his broken house, is a fisherman by trade and had returned to the village just two days before the cyclone. Like his 200-some fellow villagers, he was asked by the project staff to move to the community center, but he decided to stay in the house with his wife at the last moment.

“I get goose bumps when I think of that night,” he says.

Before Phailin hit, VARRAT staff members visited all 25 villages where it has programs to make sure everyone was in a safe location.

“All of our field staff members were deployed to ensure that the message of the cyclone reached everyone and that all of them were evacuated ahead of the cyclone that wreaked havoc in coastal Odisha,” says Naba Kishore Mishra, VARRAT’s project manager. “We were informed about the cyclone about a week before, and ChildFund India advised us to take necessary measures to safeguard not only our sponsored children and their families, but also all villagers. And we took measures accordingly.”

History played a role as well, Mishra notes. “Since we had experienced the 1999 cyclone, we had strengthened our disaster response mechanism, and that helped this time around to save all lives, including cattle and other livestock.”

cyclone

Naba Kishore Mishra, VARRAT’s project manager, takes notes while interviewing a man affected by the cyclone.

Soon after 1999’s devastating super cyclone, VARRAT took several protection measures, one of which was the construction of multi-purpose community centers — like the one to which Sangram’s children evacuated — in all their program villages. Although they had access to shelter during the recent cyclone, villagers still lost more than 75 percent of their standing paddy crop because of heavy rains. A ChildFund team has visited those villages and found that many of the villages’ roads were destroyed by flooding. Mosquitoes are breeding in the standing water, increasing the risk of malaria, dengue and other vector-borne illness, and villagers are beginning to suffer from waterborne diseases that cause upset stomachs and skin infections.

Education also has been affected because all schools and Early Childhood Development centers are currently serving as makeshift shelters or as bases for relief services. Normally, children receive lunch prepared at school or an ECD center, but this has been suspended during the disaster as well.  

Representatives from VARRAT have started distributing water purification tablets and diarrhea medication in some villages, but much still needs to be done. ChildFund’s Emergency Action Fund helps us prepare for disasters in the countries we serve, allowing staff and partners on the ground to provide help quickly and also over the long term. Please consider making a donation today.

Reflecting on ChildFund’s Impact in Timor-Leste

By Sylvia Ximenes, ChildFund Timor-Leste

In Timor-Leste, staff members at ChildFund’s national office recently created a wall decoration in celebration of the 75th anniversary of our organization and looked back at what ChildFund has meant in our country, which has seen major changes in the past decade, including its political independence. 

75th ChildFund logo“In the life of a child, every year is significant,” says Geoffrey Ezepue, ChildFund Timor-Leste’s national director. “Each year, children need access to education, good nutrition, health services and a safe and supportive environment in which to grow and learn. This is something that ChildFund has been striving to achieve every year for 75 years.” 

Reflecting on our organization’s history, Vicente Alves, in sponsor relations, also looks forward to its future growth. “Commit and move ahead,” he says. “We can do it!”

Marcos Fatima has worked with ChildFund since 1991, when it was still known as Christian Children’s Fund. At the start, Marcos was employed with local partner organization Assistentia Caritas, and he has held several positions with ChildFund in the intervening years. In 1999, a time of political upheaval in Timor-Leste, Marcos was an assistant manager for a shelter program. His team provided assistance to families in need of homes, distributing materials such as zinc roofing sheets, timber and cement in two districts.

Timor-Leste staff

Some of our staff members in Timor-Leste show off their wall decoration for ChildFund’s 75th anniversary.

In 2006, another conflict broke out in Timor-Leste, causing the displacement of many families; at that time, Marcos became a youth facilitator, providing training and games for youth and children to reduce stress and feel more at ease while they lived in Internally Displaced People, or IDP, camps.

Since 2007, he has been a senior assistant for ChildFund Timor-Leste. “I enjoyed my work from the beginning, because this is a great job,” Marcos says.  “We dedicate our time to work directly with children, especially the ones who are deprived, excluded and vulnerable.” Furthermore, he adds, we can help to empower children through our programs and activities.

Timor-Leste staffAs a father of six children — two boys and four girls — he acknowledges the importance of education to all of his children. “I started with nothing, but after working with ChildFund, I feel confident to provide a better education and support to my own children from the benefits that I receive,” Marcos says.

Updates on Cyclone Phailin in India

 

cyclone flooding

Flooding in the Kendrapada district of the eastern Indian state of Odisha.

As you may be aware, India’s eastern state of Odisha was hit last weekend by Cyclone Phailin, with 124 mph winds and heavy rain that damaged or destroyed nearly 250,000 homes and 1.25 million acres of farmland. Children and families whom ChildFund serves were affected, and three families suffered damage to their homes. Our emergency updates page has current information about the storm’s impact and how we are responding to the needs of the families we serve. You can help us stay prepared to respond quickly to the next natural disaster by making a donation to the Emergency Action Fund.

A Q&A With Carol Mortensen, ChildFund Cambodia National Director

Interview by Sierra Winston, ChildFund Communications Intern

This is one in a series of interviews with ChildFund’s national directors in honor of ChildFund International’s 75th anniversary. 

75th ChildFund logoHow long have you been with ChildFund?
I have been working for ChildFund since May 2007. I was hired to establish ChildFund Cambodia, working in cooperation with ChildFund Australia.

Where did you work before ChildFund?
I have done many jobs before working at ChildFund: When I was growing up, I took holidays jobs such as cinema usherette, postal service redirection worker, vegetable and fruit picker, toy shop and gift shop salesperson. Later on in life, I was a teacher in Australia and Africa, and I have also worked for Australian Volunteers and Save the Children.

Carol Mortensen

Carol Mortensen, national director of ChildFund Cambodia

What is the most difficult situation you have encountered in your job?
The most difficult situation I have encountered in my job is speaking to young people and hearing about the barriers that prevent them from achieving their dreams. The barriers can range from the simple, which ChildFund can address through programs and project activities, to the more challenging, systemic barriers.

ChildFund is working on challenging existing power structures in an appropriate manner, both at the local and national level, but it takes time. There are many visible improvements in the lives of children today in Cambodia, but there is still a lot more to do, especially in rural communities where the wealth gap between the rich and poor has increased at a greater rate than in urban communities.

What successes have you had in your national office?
Some of the successes would have to include establishing the Cambodia program and scaling up activities each year, responding to opportunities that present themselves. Also, hearing that the relationship Cambodia staff have with the royal government of Cambodia is highly valued by authorities.

Authorities at the district, commune and village levels now have firsthand experience of working with children and youth and understanding the value they can bring to development planning. We see members of a youth group reach into their backpacks and pull out the 5-year District Development Plan and identify the priorities that were included as a result of their lobbying. Also, we read in evaluations that youths and households have  increased monthly income through ChildFund income-generation training and support activities. A parent approached us to ask if her son could attend youth group trainings even though he is not a youth club member, because she has seen the benefit it gave her eldest daughter.

What motivates you in life?
I am motivated by hope and possibility. Even in very difficult circumstances, young people will often have ideas and want to be involved in community planning.

Cambodian girls

Cambodian girls get water from a pump.

What do you like to do in your free time?
Like so many people I know, I am often trying to have greater balance in my life. I spend time with family and friends, I read, I get involved in my local community wherever I am living, try to do something new every year. A friend and I have committed to each identify resolutions to focus on each month, but we’ve also learnt that we often have to revise or reschedule resolutions. Perhaps we’ll get better at this as time goes on.

Who is your role model?
My mother, who believed that it didn’t matter what religion you were but whether you helped your neighbor when they were in need. I am not sure if she would have called herself a feminist, but she had the same expectations of my brother and me to help around the house; only after I left home did I realize this was not a common expectation across all families.

What is a quote, saying or belief that you live by?
Different quotes have been important to me at different times in my life. Today an Australian Aboriginal proverb resonates: “Those who lose dreaming are lost.”

The Mama Effect

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