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Philippines Children Make Progress After Typhoon

By Julien Anseau, Asia Region Communications Manager

As you approach Tambulilid school, the singing and laughter of children gets louder and louder. It’s great to hear children having fun and being children again.

child's drawing

Children are beginning to draw happier subjects at Child-Centered Spaces in the Philippines, post Typhoon Haiyan.

Nearly one month after Typhoon Haiyan struck islands in the Philippines, ravaged communities are slowly getting back on their feet. In the devastated city of Ormoc, ChildFund is addressing the immediate needs of impacted families by distributing food packs and essential items including hygiene kits, roofing materials and cooking utensils.

ChildFund is also focusing on providing psychosocial support to children. In disaster situations, children are particularly vulnerable. While parents are out looking for shelter, food, water and emergency assistance, children are often left unsupervised, increasing their susceptibility to abuse, exploitation and harassment. Children are often separated from loved ones and exposed to levels of destruction that have long-term effects on their psychological and physical development.

ChildFund was quick to establish Child-Centered Spaces immediately following Typhoon Haiyan to provide a safe haven for children to play, socialize, learn and express themselves in a caring and supportive environment. At Tambulilid school, where ChildFund established its first CCS after the typhoon, a young mother, Rein, says: “I leave my daughter here while I stand in the long distribution line for food. She is only 5 years old. It is important she has a safe place to play under supervision.”

At a CCS, children take part in activities that help them overcome the traumatic experience they went through. It is also a place where children can be children again.

children in Ormoc

ChildFund has helped establish 13 Child-Centered Spaces after the typhoon struck last month.

“For a few hours every day, I can forget what happened and play with friends,” says a smiling Angel, age 7. Marcela, a local ChildFund staff member, explains: “Children take part in drawing, singing, dancing, playing and storytelling, which allow emotional expression.”

Today, children are drawing. They are enjoying themselves. Marcela adds: “At first, most children drew pictures of the typhoon and the destruction, but in more recent days, they are drawing their family and friends. This is an important sign in post-trauma healing. Child-centered spaces help in this respect.”

More than 300 children participate daily at Tambulilid, one of three CCSs run by ChildFund in Ormoc. “We conduct separate sessions for different age groups, where we provide age-appropriate structured activities,” Marcela says. “Many youths are trained facilitators and have volunteered to conduct sessions for younger children, because they want to be active in the community’s recovery. We have also mobilized many volunteers. ChildFund has worked in Ormoc through a local partner organization for many years, and we have a strong relationship with the local community. We train our volunteers to provide basic support to children dealing with distress and shock from their situations, and to recognize children who need to be referred for more specialized services.”

smiling children in Philippines

Although smiles have returned to children’s faces in Ormoc, many more need support in devastated Philippines communities.

Although food aid has arrived in Ormoc, malnutrition is still an issue as a number of children appear to be underweight. ChildFund provides food to children at the CCS. Marcela says: “The first day we opened the CCS, we served pancit (a type of Filipino noodles). It was the first time children ate a cooked meal since the typhoon struck. They were extremely hungry. They ate everything up quickly and they had a smile back on their faces. The second day we served pandesal (a popular bread roll in the Philippines made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar, and salt).” Today, it is spaghetti with tomato sauce. It makes a nice change from the rice and canned sardines they eat every day in the evacuation centers.  

While the situation in Ormoc is improving, basic survival resources — food, drinking water, shelter and access to medical treatment — are still needed. Schools were expected to reopen sometime this month, but with school buildings extensively damaged, this is unlikely. Schools are in need of major repair to be safely occupied, and learning and teaching materials need to be replaced if classes are to resume as intended. There is still no date for the restart of pre-school and day care activities at this time — highlighting the critical importance of ChildFund’s Child-Centered Spaces.  

ChildFund has opened 13 CCSs impacted areas in the Philippines, but thousands of children still require psychosocial support to overcome trauma from the typhoon. With your support, ChildFund will be able to open more spaces for affected children.

The Amazing Gift of Sponsorship

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Willy Peeters arrived in Miami, Fla., in 1995, to start a business in scale modeling and design. He is from Belgium, but he decided to make a change and move westward, a shift he’s continued with a recent move to Texas.

75th ChildFund logoIn 1997, he was watching TV, when he saw a commercial for ChildFund, then known as Christian Children’s Fund. It flipped a switch in Willy’s head, and he decided to sponsor a child — a girl from the Philippines.

“I thought it was the right thing to do, to give a child a chance,” Willy says.

The child’s name was Khim, and she was in first grade. Today, at age 23, she is a teacher and the mother of a daughter; they live on Basilan Island, in the Mindanao region of the Philippines. ChildFund continues to work in this region today; although the island is often affected by storms, it was not damaged by the recent super typhoon Haiyan.

Khim

Khim, a former sponsored child.

“It was a coincidence that I needed a father’s love, which I found in him,” Khim says, “and he, who doesn’t have a child of his own, is fond of kids. I remember one staff member [from ChildFund] saying to me how other kids from the organization envy me for having Uncle Will. I felt really special, because he treated me not just as a sponsored child but as a part of his own family.”

Willy and Khim share a love of reading. Although we can no longer ensure that bulky packages get from sponsor to child today, back then, Willy sent Khim science books, which helped her in her education.

He still has a box of letters and pictures she sent him with updates through the years. “I will never get rid of those,” he says. Willy’s sponsorship of Khim continued until she was 18. He didn’t expect to hear from Khim again after the sponsorship ended, but he received a message on Facebook from her two years ago, when she was in college.

And last Christmas, Khim messaged Willy again to let him know that she had achieved another goal.

Willy Peeters

Willy Peeters

“[She] thanked me for sponsoring her because she [had] just passed the exam and is now a teacher, just like she always wrote she would like to be one day,” Willy says. “I could not have imagined receiving such a heartwarming present and that my simple efforts made such a difference in somebody’s life thousands of miles away. She has a great family now, and I couldn’t have been prouder of her for working as hard as she promised in her letters.”

Willy hopes one day to meet Khim in person, and he’s thinking about sponsoring another child through ChildFund.

“My uncle is really a philanthropist at heart,” Khim says. “He would always ask me what I am going to take when I reach college. He started sending money for my savings account, which I used when I reached college. Now, I am already a teacher with the help of my dear Uncle Will, through the help of CCF. Thanks a lot for helping us build our dream.”

Catch up with our ongoing 75th anniversary blog series.

On Giving Tuesday, Give a Girl a Dream Bike

By Christine Ennulat, ChildFund Senior Writer

Giving Tuesday is a day dedicated to giving back.

giving tuesdayAnd today, we will be doing our part by trying to reach a goal of providing bicycles to 1,000 girls who live in rural villages in Sri Lanka and India — so they can continue their path toward education and economic independence.

In developing countries the world over, girls are up at the crack of dawn, getting ready to leave for school. They have to be, because their morning ritual includes a long, long walk — two miles, three miles or more.

A Year Ago

In Sri Lanka, Sanuja’s trek to school is a gravel road through a deep wilderness, especially scary in the dark. But she has no choice if she is to take advantage of the evening classes her school offers to help children make up ground lost while Sri Lanka’s schools were closed during the recent civil conflict. So, Sanuja leaves the class early or skips it entirely to be home before dark.

In rural India, snakes or scorpions often block Shakuntala’s path to school. Sometimes streams rush down from the hillsides and across the way during the monsoons. Her classmate Hirabai once faced a pack of wild boars.

Both girls remember stopping to help friends who had hurt themselves on the poorly maintained roads, and being late for it. At their school, when anyone is late for any reason, they are made to stand outside of class for an hour.

Dream Bike in India

A girl and her Dream Bike in India.

Today

Sanuja’s attendance at school and her special classes is now regular and punctual, and her grades have improved dramatically — with the gift of a Dream Bike.

Shakuntala, who wants to become a teacher and support her widowed mother, and Hirabai, who aspires to be a police officer, feel much more confident that they’ll be able to achieve their dreams, thanks to the gift of a Dream Bike.

As we focus on giving gifts during the holiday season, consider the girls of India and Sri Lanka who could live happier lives with greater educational and job opportunities, better health and economic freedom. Donate a Dream Bike.

HIV, From a Child’s Point of View

By Saroj Pattnaik, ChildFund India

Today we recognize World AIDS Day by taking a look at the hardships encountered by an Indian boy who was diagnosed HIV-positive after losing his parents to AIDS. 

The pain that Appashi has gone through is too overwhelming to be contained in an 11-year-old’s heart. At the age of 3, he lost both his parents to AIDS. Though he found a shelter at his maternal uncle’s place, he soon became a victim of severe discrimination and negligence — because he too was found to be HIV-positive.

Appashi planting

Boys plant a sapling at their orphanage.

Living in India’s Karnataka state, Appashi was kept in a separate room and not allowed to mingle with his uncle’s children, who were all older than him. While they attended school, he was tasked with taking care of the cattle. While the other family members ate together, he took his meals separately in the corner of the room.

“I cannot remember when the last time I had food together with others at my uncle’s house. They often ate chicken, but I was never given any. Whenever I asked for it, I got scolded by my aunt,” Appashi says.

“I was spending my day feeding and taking care of the cattle at home. I was hardly allowed to play, not even with other children in the village. The only thing my uncle was doing for me was that he was taking me to a hospital when I was falling sick,” he recalls. “This was my life till I came here three years ago.”

Appashi having lunch

Children eat lunch at the orphanage.

Appashi was brought to Namma Makkala Dhama, a unique rehabilitation center for orphans and other children affected by HIV and AIDS, run by Ujwala Rural Development Service Society in Bhagalkot district and supported by ChildFund. Last year, the orphanage was renamed as Nammuru Dham (My Village) and was shifted to Bijapur, a small city some 500 kilometers away from Bangalore. 

When Appashi came to the orphanage, he was severely malnourished and sick. The officials at the center immediately carried out his health check-up and gave him medication including antiretroviral therapy (ART) — the standard medication used to suppress the HIV virus and stop progression of the disease.

“At the time of admission to our orphanage, he was weighing only 15 kilograms [about 34 pounds], which was much below the standard weight for a 7-year-old,” says URDSS director Vasudev Tolabandi. We gave him special care as required by his health condition. With proper food and medication, his condition improved gradually and now he is weighing 28 kilos [about 62 pounds].”

Appashi playing cricket

Children at the orphanage get to play cricket.

Appashi, now in fifth grade, says he is relieved to be living in the center and now looks forward to a better life. “I am happy that I don’t have to take care of cattle anymore. I am getting good food, including my favorite dish — chicken curry and scrambled egg,” he says. “All my friends here also like chicken and egg. I think all children should be given chicken, eggs, milk and fruits because they provide all vitamins to our body,” he reasons.

“Here, I have many friends with whom I study and play together. I am lucky to be here,” Appashi says, adding he would like to become a police officer and punish those who commit violence against children.

According to Tolabandi, there are 10 children like Appashi who are HIV-positive and need constant care and supervision. “We had 30 children aged 6 to 14 years at our center. But recently, some children who were not HIV-infected have been allowed to go to their families or relatives’ places on the assurance that they will be taken care of properly,” he says.

“There are so many children who need our help, and we are planning to enroll 25 more children in the orphanage within a couple of weeks,” he says, adding that arranging funds for the children’s basic needs such as food, clothes, medicine and study materials is still a big problem.

You can help children like Appashi on World AIDS Day by making a contribution to the center through our Gifts of Love & Hope catalog.

A Q&A with Indonesia’s National Director, Guru Naik

Interview by Sierra Winston, ChildFund Communications Intern

In our 75-post series in honor of ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we’re talking with several of our national directors who oversee operations in the countries where we work in Africa, the Americas and Asia. Today, we hear from Guru Naik of Indonesia.

75th ChildFund logoHow long have you been with ChildFund?
I have just completed eight years of being with ChildFund. First with ChildFund India, then with ChildFund’s Asia regional office, then with ChildFund Timor-Leste, then with ChildFund Sri Lanka and now with ChildFund Indonesia.

What is your favorite thing about working at ChildFund?
I see myself as primarily a livelihood specialist. Working at ChildFund gives me an enormous opportunity to work for youth development.

Guru Naik

Guru Naik

What is the most difficult situation you have encountered in your job?
The most difficult situation I encountered was when my visa in Sri Lanka expired, and it was not renewed. The government of Sri Lanka gives a maximum three years residence visa to expats who work for international nongovernmental organizations. I managed to stay in Sri Lanka for three and a half years, but then the visa was not further extended, and I had to leave Sri Lanka.

What successes have you had in your national office?
I am very happy about the two major accomplishments by Indonesia’s national office during the last year:

This year we hosted ChildFund International Board of Directors meeting. It was an enormous effort, and we were also worried about the security. However, at the end, we were extremely successful in organizing every aspect of the board meeting and field visit.

Indonesia is located in the Pacific Ring of fire and considered the second most disaster-prone country in the world. [Editor’s note: This ranking was produced by risk advisory firm Maplecroft.] Living in such an environment, we have been extremely successful in our Disaster Risk Reduction efforts. We are the country lead of AADMER (ASEAN Agreement on Disaster Management and Emergency Response).

 

Guru in the field
Guru spends time in the field, in Indonesia.

What motivates you?
Desire to excel in life always motivates me in my work.

What do you like to do in your free time?
I normally watch TV and listen to old Hindi songs.

Who is your role model?
My role model is Vijay Mahajan, who is the founder of the first Indian NGO, PRADAN, where I worked, who also brought me into the development sector.

What is a quote, saying or belief that you live by?
I believe in the saying, “Small is beautiful.”

In the Eye of Typhoon Haiyan

By Martin Nañawa, ChildFund Philippines

“Daddy, play outside?” little Yvo asked his father. The louvers at the foot of the door allowed in gusts of water spray that only excited the 1-year-old more. He struggled out of his clothes down to his underwear, as if he were about to go for an innocent swim.

Yves

Former sponsored child Yves meets ChildFund field manager Marcella Donaal.

His father, Yves, braced himself against the door, fearing it would blow open under the sheer force of Typhoon Haiyan’s winds. But he calmly turned to his son and tried to explain the difference between a super typhoon and a light morning rain shower. Yvo did not understand the gravity of the situation, but he knew to trust and obey his father, and he contented himself with dancing from one foot to another, stamping at the puddles of water building at his feet. Yves, however, kept watch at the door, fearful for his family’s safety and praying that the typhoon would disappear.

Suddenly it did. As quickly as the winds picked up at around 8 that morning, the whole of Ormoc City fell calm. The skies cleared, and it was as bright a noon as they were used to. Yves and his family ran outside the public school classroom where they’d sought shelter. People bumped into each other, walking around, arms outstretched and gazes fixed on the sky. Some laughed, showing their expressions of relief and disbelief and hugging each other. It was almost too good to be true.

Ormoc destruction

A scene of devastation in Ormoc.

Something told Yves it was. He spun around where he stood, surveying the horizon. Long fingers of clouds clawed at the very periphery of the entire Ormoc skyline. Then, to his horror, Yves remembered a lesson from his childhood. He picked Yvo up and ran, shouting and waving at his fellow evacuees, “Turn back! Turn back! It’s not over! It’s just the eye of the storm,” he gasped.

Typhoon Haiyan was merciless when it resumed its battery of Ormoc. Even the shelter of the concrete classroom felt frail amid winds that this time blew in the opposite direction. Glass shattered, and corrugated iron wailed inhuman cries as sheets tumbled in the wind and crumpled like paper. “I tried to film the carnage with my camera phone, but I relented, fearing the wind would tear my phone from my grip,” Yves said.

Child-Centered Space

ChildFund set up Child-Centered Spaces in Ormoc and other affected areas in Philippines as soon as possible.

Hours later, it was truly over. Typhoon Haiyan had now crossed the island of Leyte and was now wreaking havoc on the islands of central and western Philippines. There were no cheers and celebration this time, however. In the fading daylight, even young Yvo seemed to understand. Typhoon Haiyan had devastated Ormoc City.

The first 24 hours were challenging. Yves found that the home his family rented had been largely ruined in the typhoon. Some sections of roofing remained intact but not enough to lend any comfort or shelter from the elements. His family would continue to reside at Linao Elementary School, where they had sought shelter during the typhoon.

The ensuing power and communications blackout covering the whole island of Leyte did not prevent word from reaching Ormoc of other towns and cities struck by Typhoon Haiyan: Palo and Tolosa were severely devastated, and Tacloban City had fallen. Death, hunger and the overwhelming number of requests to the local government had driven people past desperation in Tacloban, and there were safety and security concerns.

ChildFund was one of the first international organizations to reach Ormoc after the typhoon. “Residents feared Ormoc would become the next Tacloban, if the situation became more desperate,” said Philippines Rapid Response Team leader Erwin Galido.

children laughing

For a little while each day, children get the chance to have fun and perhaps forget a moment about the storm’s wreckage outside.

Despite these apprehensions, or perhaps specifically because of what was at stake, ChildFund committed to assist all of the residents of Ormoc City — not just the sponsored children and families supported through the local partner organization.

ChildFund’s Rapid Response Team — carrying tents, sleeping bags and other provisions for survival —  proceeded into Ormoc, located the local partner staff members and their  flooded office. ChildFund’s team needed a new base to establish a supply chain of food and essential non-food aid. It turned out that Yves was able to help.

Yves’ workplace, a small hotel where he was night manager, had survived the typhoon. Yves has two jobs, both as a manager and teaching hotel and restaurant management, a degree he achieved thanks to his sponsorship through ChildFund. Despite his city’s grim circumstances, Yves reported for work.

Yves learned that other Ormoc residents, government officials, small vendors and entrepreneurs decided to report for work too. He also heard that a few aid organizations and nongovernmental organizations had landed in Ormoc and was sure that ChildFund was among them. No sooner had he hoped to hear word then he ran into ChildFund’s Response Team, right in the hotel lobby. It was a happy reunion between ChildFund staff and a former sponsored child, despite the circumstances.

Child-Centered Space

Child-Centered Spaces also provide children with nutritious food and help them feel secure.

Yves offered to move ChildFund’s operations into the small, modest hotel. It had a generator, which operates at key hours of the day, allowing the team members to charge equipment and keep in touch with the response center established in neighboring Cebu Island. ChildFund also immediately established Child-Centered Spaces, which offer activities for children and youths to help them understand and recover from the psychological trauma of the destructive storm. UNICEF noted that ChildFund was the first international organization on the scene to establish these psychosocial support activities in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan.

Child-Centered Spaces are also the entry point for child protection activities in evacuation camps. The density of displaced populations, along with the lack of privacy and sharing of common latrines, place many children at risk during times of emergency. ChildFund staff members and volunteers make sure that referral and child-protection mechanisms are in place and that people know how to employ them.

Child-Centered Spaces

Our work in Ormoc and other cities and villages has just started, but we’ll continue to press forward.

One such Child-Centered Space was set up at the Linao Elementary School, where Yves and his family are sheltered. ChildFund staff members and trained volunteers from the local partner gathered children sheltered there to play, draw and express their emotions. Infants, children, and youth are grouped separately, and little Yvo gets to join the below-5 age group.

“Daddy, play outside!” Yvo shouts when it’s time for Child-Centered Space activities. This time, Yves knows it’s safe.

In Ormoc: ‘It Was the End of the World – We’re Lucky to Be Alive’

By Julien Anseau, Asia Region Communications Manager

Julien, who has joined ChildFund’s emergency response team on the ground in the Philippines, provides a firsthand view of the damage wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in Ormoc, 60 miles southwest of Tacloban, where ChildFund have been working with children for many years and is now focusing its response.

As the ferry from Cebu pulls into Ormoc, the devastation before me is unbelievable. Buildings and houses have been flattened, electricity pylons blown down, cars turned over, palm trees ripped apart. As I disembark, people walk toward me holding out their hands and asking for food. I note the long lines of people desperate to board the ferry back to Cebu, as many try to leave this hard-hit island.

Filipino children regroup after the storm

Sunny, 13, (third from left): “I was very scared. I could hear the roofs being blown away and houses crumbling.”

My first destination is the coastal community of Naungan. Children are on the streets, fetching water, looking for food or just hanging around doing nothing. I meet Sunny, a barefoot 13-year-boy who is sponsored through ChildFund. “I was in the school (evacuation center) with my family when the storm hit,” he tells me. “The wind was furious and howling. The noise was deafening. It went on for hours. It was dark outside and the school was shaking. I was very scared. Everyone was screaming and crying and praying. I could hear houses being smashed away and I thought the school would be next. When the storm ended, we went outside and could not believe the destruction. It was the end of the world. We’re lucky to be alive.”

As in other parts of Ormoc, 90 percent of the houses in this coastal community have been completely blown away. There is no electricity, and we’re hearing that power likely will not be restored for four months. All schools are closed and are in use as evacuation centers for the thousands who no longer have homes to return to. Everywhere I go, people are going hungry and asking for food. There is a huge need for rice, a staple of the Filipino diet. Noodles and canned food are also needed. Food aid is only just reaching Ormoc, and it’s only trickling in.

Filipino girl who survived storm

Michelle, 18: “People in the evacuation center were screaming, crying and praying. I cried and cried.”

I head back into town. There are long lines of people waiting for fuel and food, adding to the chaos. As I walk along the crowded main street littered with debris, a voice calls out, “Hey, ChildFund.” I turn to see a young woman. It turns out she recognized my green T-shirt. Michelle, 18, is also sponsored through ChildFund. She tells a similar story to Sunny’s. Her house has been badly destroyed and her dad is desperately looking for construction materials to fix it. There is a huge need for roof tarpaulins and plastic sheeting in Ormoc, as the rain continues to come down, making living conditions miserable. Pneumonia and flu are already major concerns, particularly among children.

Next, I meet Manny, 21, who participates in ChildFund’s youth programs. He shows me his house in the area of San Isidro, where ChildFund serves 144 children. “This is my house,” he says when we arrive. “This is how I found it after the storm. Everything is lost, everything!”

Filipino youth in front of destroyed home

Manny, 21: “This is my house. This is how I found it after the storm. Everything is lost, everything!”

As ChildFund responds in Ormoc, we know that children are particularly vulnerable in disaster situations. Many children are wondering the streets unaccompanied, while their parents look for food and water. Children who have survived this typhoon have lost their sense of security; their world has been turned upside down. The need for psychosocial support is great.

Late last week, ChildFund has opened its first Child-Centered Space in Ormoc. These are safe havens for children to come together, take part in structured activities and, for a few hours, forget the typhoon and just enjoy being children again. I learn that 114 children of all ages have come to play, draw and sing. For the first time since the typhoon hit, smiles appear on their faces. These activities help children deal with trauma and restore some normal routines to their lives. ChildFund also provides food to the children.

As we look ahead to the long-term needs in the Philippine islands battered by the storm, we see a huge need for rebuilding homes and restoring livelihoods. Yet, local officials and communities fear Ormoc will be overlooked and that aid will bypass them because of pressing needs in nearby Tacloban.

On the day of my visit, it continues to rain and it’s getting dark, hampering relief operations. The people of Ormoc are bracing themselves for another uncomfortable night. For thousands of young people like Sunny, Michelle and Manny, it means going to bed hungry, sleeping in damp conditions and reliving the nightmare of one week ago when the storm struck.

ChildFund has launched the Philippines Relief and Recovery Fund to respond to both immediate and long-term needs in the Philippines. Relief-phase interventions will include distribution of food and non-food items, responding to immediate health needs and establishing Child-Centered Spaces. The recovery phase will include restoring livelihoods and focusing on education, health and nutrition of children, while strengthening community-based child protection systems and conducting disaster risk reduction and emergency response training and capacity building.

Learn more about ChildFund’s response and how you can help.

A Big Day Out for Sri Lankan Children

By Himangi Jayasundera, ChildFund Sri Lanka

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrated the 75th anniversary of ChildFund International by taking 175 children to an amusement and water park. It was a day of fun rides and water slides for these children, who came from 11 districts where ChildFund works in Sri Lanka.

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrationThe celebrations commenced with a video screening of a message from ChildFund CEO and President Anne Goddard, followed by speeches from Eleanor Loudon, Sri Lanka’s national director, and short speeches by three participating children, who aired their opinions on education, child protection and what they would do if they were the leader of their country.

A highlight of the day was the launch of Listening to the Voices of Children, a report on the ideas and aspirations of children based on a survey of 1,000 children in 11 districts. The children who went to the amusement park were selected in a lottery from those who participated in the survey.

Other highlights included the cutting of the big 75th anniversary cake, distribution of gifts and a group photo.

“It has been a great day,” said Isuru, 12. “I especially liked the water slides, and we went on many rides. I didn’t expect it to be so much fun.”

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrationChildFund Sri Lanka celebration

Assessing and Responding to Devastation in the Philippines

Reporting by ChildFund Philippines staff

As we begin to understand the scope of Typhoon Haiyan’s toll on the Philippines, ChildFund staff members and our local partner organizations are in the devastated communities, distributing aid and assessing needs. You can assist by making a donation to our Philippines Relief and Recovery Fund. Here is the most recent report from our Philippines colleagues:

ChildFund has started to implement its emergency response in these priority areas: Ormoc City, Roxas City and Tacloban City. An operations center has been established in Cebu City as the staging point for logistics and personnel deployment to Tacloban and other Eastern Visayas provinces. Procurement of relief goods (food packs and non-food items) is ongoing simultaneously in Manila and Cebu City.

Below is a summary of the results of the rapid assessment done by our staff on the field:

damage in Ormoc City

Ormoc City was one of the most devastated localities in the Philippines. ChildFund was among the first aid organizations to reach the city.

Ormoc City, Leyte: The entire population of about 100,000 families has been affected. Food and potable water are their most urgent needs. Only 35 of the 110 barangays (districts) have received food packs, which are good for two days only. There are no local suppliers. There is also no electricity. Although there is a water supply, not all water is potable. At this time, 90 percent of roads and bridges are passable. Public buildings have sustained major damage. The local government can arrange for the transportation to deliver supplies from Cebu City.

Our local partner has accounted for all 271 enrolled children. Most of them have damaged houses. Meanwhile, the office of our local partner is severely damaged.

Roxas City, Capiz: The entire city sustained heavy damage from the typhoon, affecting 12,123 people, or 2,499 households. Nearly 5,000 children are affected. More than 10,000 people have left their homes and are currently living with relatives, in makeshift tents or at designated evacuation centers. ChildFund staff has determined the presence of 450 families in 20 evacuation centers. There is no electricity in the entire city, but cell phone network coverage has been restored. There is a potable water supply, but it is running low. 

phones recharging

Cell phones recharging in Ormoc.

ChildFund operates in 13 of the 47 barangays in Roxas City. ChildFund is in close coordination with the city’s Social Welfare and Development Office.  So far, ChildFund is the only nongovernmental organization present in the area. ChildFund has initially distributed 200 units of 6-liter bottled water. Food and non-food items are still being packaged and will be ready for distribution shortly. The staff is in the process of setting up a Child-Centered Space in Culasi, one of the hardest hit barangays. The staff members have conducted a preliminary session for 30 children. More sessions will take place in the following days.

Iloilo City, Iloilio: Our local partner has initially conducted activities for children and distributed 200 units of bottled water at one evacuation center. Based on the assessment of the ChildFund team, the municipality of Estancia is being recommended as another area for response since it is the hardest-hit municipality in the province.

distributing water

Distributing water in Ormoc City.

Tacloban City, Leyte: Its population of 220,000 people bore the brunt of the typhoon, with the death toll being placed so far at 1,774 by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. There are 13 evacuation centers hosting about 15,000 people.  Although we do not have programs in Tacloban, ChildFund has an assessment team standing by.

Toboso, Negros Occidental: All barangays of this municipality were affected. Some 1,256 families or 5,213 people are in evacuation centers. There is no electricity in the municipality, and it most likely will not be restored until December. Food and non-food items are the priority needs.

ChildFund Philippines

ChildFund Philippines staff members meet at the national office to prepare their response to the typhoon.

ChildFund is coordinating with the Social Welfare Office and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. So far, ChildFund is the only organization coordinating with the local government unit, which can provide transportation for the relief goods. Community Watch groups, barangay officials and teachers also can be mobilized for relief operations.

San Carlos City, Negros Occidental: ChildFund works in six of the 17 barangays in San Carlos. The entire city, home to more than 13,000 people, was affected. The local government, which through the Social Welfare office provided relief goods in the evacuation centers during the typhoon, now is giving priority only to families whose houses are totally damaged. There is no electricity. Food and non-food items (mats, blankets, mosquito nets) are needed. ChildFund is coordinating with the Social Welfare Office and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

Bacolod City, Negros Occidental: No reports of storm damage. Our local partner has accounted for the 2,560 enrolled children in Roxas City, Iloilo and Bacolod.

Typhoon Haiyan Update: Response Begins in Hardest-Hit Areas

typhoon devastation in Philippines

Residents walk on a road littered with debris after Super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban City. REUTERS/Erik De Castro, courtesy Trust.org

ChildFund, along with our partners in the ChildFund Alliance, has launched an appeal for $10 million for immediate relief and long-term recovery for children and families affected by Typhoon Haiyan, which slammed into the Philippines over the weekend.

We have identified three priority areas for our emergency response efforts: Ormoc City and Roxas City, where we have programs and sponsored children, and Tacloban City, a non-program area that is also identified by United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination as among the hardest-hit localities.

Our immediate goals:

Establish Child-Centered Spaces in Ormoc, Roxas and Tacloban – two centers in each city.

Distribute food packs (rice, noodles and canned goods) for 3,000 families.

Distribute non-food items (bath soap, children’s underwear, sanitary supplies, baby diapers and laundry soap) to 3,000 families.

The contents of the food packs are based on government recommendations for relief items. For the non-food items, ChildFund chose a selection of basic necessities to fill gaps in the standard packs provided by the government and other entities, thereby getting a broader selection of essentials to families. 

We are also in the process of setting up an operations center in Cebu, which has been declared by the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs to be the staging point for any logistics and personnel going to Tacloban and other eastern provinces. Cebu is the closest city to the hard-hit areas, and we have approval from a university to use a large space in its complex for staging.

typhoon devastation in Philippines

Tacloban City is one of the hardest-hit localities. REUTERS/Erik De Castro, courtesy of Trust.org

Updates on ChildFund-Supported Communities

Iloilo: ChildFund’s local partner organization there is providing support to an evacuation center in the city. The local government has declared a state of calamity and is seeking help from nongovernmental organizations. The local partner plans to establish a Child-Centered Space and distribute bottled water and food packs.

Ormoc: We have yet to reconnect communications with our local partner in Ormoc City. Many towns and communities in Leyte province still cannot be reached.  A small response team is seeking to reach the area by ferry, but security is a high concern. Ormoc remains largely unreached by relief efforts.

Negros Occidental: Our local partner with the Child Labor Project in Negros is still assessing damage and accounting for children and families. The community has been declared a disaster area, with immediate needs for food and shelter. Our local partner is coordinating with the Provincial Department of Social Welfare and Development to address these needs.

Bacolod City: No reports of storm damage.

Update on Vietnam

Typhoon Haiyan weakened to a tropical depression on Monday as it crossed into Vietnam. Based on initial reports, no significant damage was expected in the inland communities where ChildFund works. These program areas include Bac Kan, Hoa Binh and Cao Bang, and they are located in the remote, mountainous regions of the north. There have been reports of strong winds and rain in coastal areas, and some damage to trees and rooftops in Hanoi, where schools have been closed. We will continue to monitor the situation closely.

You can help families in the Philippines with a donation to our Emergency Action Fund, and this video featuring Philippines National Director Katherine Manik has up-to-date information about what ChildFund is doing to help families in typhoon-stricken areas:

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