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Meet Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme of Brazil

Guilherme, 6, is from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and likes corresponding with his sponsor.

By Agueda Barreto, ChildFund Brasil

Six-year-old Guilherme was born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a neighborhood that has seen significant criminal activity. He’s a lively and curious child, full of energy, and his life has improved a great deal since his mother enrolled him in ChildFund’s programs.

Guilherme and his younger brother, 4-year-old Gabriel, participate in activities at ChildFund’s local partner GEDAM. He and his brother no longer have to stay at home as much or at someone else’s house while their mother works. They can be children! Today, Guilherme’s writing a letter to his ChildFund sponsor with his mother, Fabiana, helping him.

“I’m writing the second letter to my sponsor, and my mom is helping me, so the letter can be beautiful,” Guilherme says. “I love to write to him, and I’m happy when I get news as well. Here at the organization, what I like to do most is judo, play soccer, jump rope, read books, dance, paint and color.”

Guilherme writing a letter

He and his mother, Fabiana, write a letter to Guilherme’s sponsor. 

Playing With What They Have

Photos from ChildFund’s offices in Bolivia, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Mexico and Timor-Leste 

In the lobby of ChildFund’s international headquarters, we don’t have your typical office décor. Instead, we have a sparsely furnished Kenyan classroom, a world map mural with paper dolls holding hands, and homemade toys collected from around the world. A lot of the toys are made with what some people might call trash: used plastic bottles, twine and bits of rubber and metal. But the toys themselves are not junk and are often prized by the children who made and played with them.

In these pictures below, you’ll see the ingenuity and creativity of children who play with what they have — animals, traditional games and toys made from available materials.

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A Hop, Skip and Jump

In August, we’ll be focusing on play — here on the blog and on ChildFund’s social media — and what it means to children’s physical, mental and social development. We asked our staff in Asia, Africa and the Americas to share pictures and quotes from children about their favorite sports, games and toys. One thing that’s striking is that some games are common to many children, regardless of age group, country and continent. As you’d expect, many of the children ChildFund works with are fans of soccer, but you’ll also see them playing with marbles or jumping rope. Many make their own toys out of materials found around their homes and communities. It takes a lot to keep children from playing, even when they don’t have toy stores around the corner.

Below is a slideshow of photos from Brazil, Ecuador and Ethiopia, all of girls jumping rope, a skill that requires good balance, stamina and high energy. Stay tuned throughout this month for more play!


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Representing Her Peers on the World Stage

Maria Antonia in New York

Maria Antônia at Rockefeller Center in New York City.

Reporting and photos: Felipe Cala, ChildFund Alliance; Roberta Cecchetti, Save the Children; Agueda Barreto and Thiago Machado, ChildFund Brasil

Fourteen-year-old Maria Antônia has made a name for herself in her home of Crato, a city in northeastern Brazil, because of her determination and community participation. This week, she had the opportunity to be heard on a world stage: a panel on the prevention of violence against children, at the United Nations’ headquarters in New York.

“I see this opportunity as a process of inclusion,” she said before the event, “because young people from 10 different countries will contribute with relevant themes on our point of view, to achieve a better world.”

The March 23 side-event took place during the third gathering of U.N. members to negotiate the post-2015 development agenda, a global set of priorities to tackle such issues as poverty, hunger, inequality and disease in the next 15 years. The goals are expected to be finalized in September. The purpose of the side-event — hosted by the governments of Canada, Guatemala, Japan and Palau — was to highlight the importance of allowing children to grow up in violence-free communities, schools and homes, and to bring their voices to decision-makers in New York.

ChildFund Alliance, Plan International, Save the Children, SOS Children’s Villages International, UNICEF and World Vision International, as well as the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence Against Children and the Latin America and Caribbean Movement for Children, collaborated to organize the discussion.

Maria Antônia spoke about physical, psychological and sexual violence and children’s own recommendations to prevent and respond to violence, including ways to report incidents safely and increasing social services at schools and health clinics.

“It is very important to improve child-friendly services within the child protection network, so that children feel confident and safe,” she said.

The visit was exciting and somewhat overwhelming for Maria Antônia, who is sponsored through ChildFund and also takes part in community projects with one of our local partners in Brazil. This was her first visit to New York City, and on the first day, she went to Central Park and saw snow for the first time (“It was beautiful,” she said). The next day, Maria Antônia prepared to speak at the U.N. headquarters, a daunting prospect.

“Early in the morning, I could only think that I would not be able to represent children and adolescents,” she recalled. “I felt fear and insecurity. But after my speech, I was congratulated. And that made me very happy. I had the feeling that I did what I had come to do.

“I realize how important it is to improve the entire environment where I live — my home, my community and my school,” she added.

And Maria Antônia is returning home with tales to tell. “My friends will ask me about the city, my experience in a new and different place, but what I really want to talk about is the opportunity to be heard. It’s a dream I could never dream.”

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#NoFilter in Brazil

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

After a long day of training at ChildFund’s national office in Brazil and a few more hours in my hotel answering emails, I closed my laptop and walked a few blocks to the closest mall. I was on a dual mission: to eat dinner and to buy a Brazilian soccer jersey for my nephew’s upcoming 12th birthday.

Later, with my belly full and my purchase in hand, I stumbled upon something so much more exciting — something I wasn’t expecting.

In the middle of the shopping center was a photography exhibit with the ChildFund logo. I became enveloped in the amazing photos, which were described as #NoFilter (a social media term indicating that the photo has not been retouched or run through a filter on Instagram). The photos were all taken by children and youth enrolled in ChildFund’s urban programs around the city of Belo Horizonte.

As the #NoFilter tag indicates, they are unfiltered, unedited and untouched… not just in the sense of using technology to alter the photos, but also in the sense of giving real perspective and insight into the daily lives of these children and youth: their identity, their roots and their realities.

These photos are a part of an outreach program, Photovoice, that uses photography to stimulate reflection among children and youth. It opens a space for them to talk about their communities and their cultural strengths. As such, these images become an important instrument to discuss citizenship, identity and collective work for the well-being of society. These photos are a launching pad for not only creative expression, but also building leaders for tomorrow.

I experienced the exhibit not only as someone who loves good photography but also as a proud ChildFund employee. I didn’t expect to stumble upon the photos, but I am so glad I did. It helped me to reconnect, yet again, with the invaluable work my colleagues do around the world helping children and youth realize their beauty, power and value just as they are: without filters.

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A Recipe for Brazil’s National Dish, Feijoada

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Brazilian cuisine is a mixture of many cultures: Native tribes and descendants of African slaves and European immigrants.

Today, local ingredients known to the original native populations are still key to Brazilian cuisine: root vegetables such as cassava and yams, fruit such as açaí, cupuaçu, mango, papaya, guava, orange, passion fruit and pineapple. Rice and beans are popular throughout the country. Seafood and dried meats (carne de sol or carne seca) are eaten along the coast, where ChildFund’s programs in Fortaleza are located.

Feijoada, Brazil’s national dish (pronounced fay-jwah-duh), is a stew made with dried, salted and smoked meats, along with rice, leafy green vegetables and black beans. Brazilians use the black beans originating in South America and various types of pork. Although there’s no one definitive recipe for feijoada, it’s traditionally served with farofa (toasted cassava flour).


Brazil’s feijoada, with greens and rice. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.



8 ounces of carne seca (or replace with unflavored beef jerky)

8 ounces of dried black beans

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup onion, chopped

1 bay leaf, crushed

½ teaspoon sea salt

8 ounces linguiça calabresa sausage (or replace with mildly spiced pork sausage)

8 ounces pork loin

1 cup white rice

1 pound chopped kale or collard greens

1 cup cassava flour

2 tablespoons butter

2 oranges, sliced thinly


Soak carne seca overnight. In a separate bowl, soak dried black beans. In the morning, drain and cut the meat into small chunks. Rinse and drain the beans.

Heat olive oil in a kettle. Add onion, bay leaf and sea salt. Sauté until onions are soft; then add sausage, cut into chunks. Cook for several more minutes. Add pork loin, cut into chunks, along with the carne seca, black beans and enough water to cover the stew. Bring to a boil, cover the kettle and reduce heat. Let simmer until beans are tender, adding water whenever necessary.

In the meantime, prepare rice. Sauté kale or collard greens in olive oil until tender.

Prepare the farofa by sautéing cassava flour in butter for about 5 minutes, or until the flour turns golden brown. Serve the beans over rice, with greens on the side. Garnish with orange slices and hot sauce. Sprinkle farofa over the top.

Serves 8.

In October, ChildFund’s blog has been celebrating the harvest and traditional foods of the countries where we work. On Fridays, we’ve been sharing recipes, which you can see here (or find all of the Harvest Month posts). 

Planting, Harvesting, Eating in Brazil

community garden

Antônia, of the city of Francisco Badaró, state of Minas Gerais, in Brazil.

By Luza Marinho, ChildFund Brasil

Helping children grow up healthy and strong is a full-time job, and in Brazil, it means sowing the seeds for community gardens. ChildFund Brasil and its partner organizations are working with families in several communities to plant gardens and grow vegetables for everyone’s nourishment, especially children.

PROCAJ, one of ChildFund Brasil’s local partner organizations in the Jequitinhonha Valley, has 57 families participating in the project Planting, Harvesting, Eating. They grow vegetables for their households at the children’s community center, and the rest of the crops are sold, generating income for the families.

gardening in Brazil

“Today we ate freshly baked vegetables and helped in feeding the kids at school. They have vegetables on the table every day,” says Maria, 68.

For many mothers involved, the project goes beyond physical nourishment; Uca says she has seen her self-esteem grow stronger as well. “Before the garden, I took anti-depression medication,” she says. “Today I don’t need it.”

Maria adds that the community gardens have also changed to how the community sees the families: “We were discredited; they used to say that we didn’t like working, that we just liked to plead. PROCAJ gave us confidence, believed in our efforts and our willingness to grow and succeed in life.”


Soccer Fever Strikes

Brasil soccer

A photo taken by Marlon, a boy enrolled in ChildFund Brasil’s Photovoice program, shows neighborhood boys playing soccer. Are you watching the World Cup games from Rio de Janeiro?

Check Out Caio’s Photographs



A self-portrait of 15-year-old Caio, whose pictures illustrate the WHO’s new adolescent health report.

A few months ago, we wrote about Caio, a young man from Brazil who was one of 10 teens chosen to take photos for the World Health Organization’s adolescent health report. He’s a sponsored child and participates in the ChildFund-supported Photovoice program in Brazil. Now the WHO’s report has been released, and you can see Caio’s images (here and here). We encourage you to read the whole report, which quotes teens from around the world about health concerns affecting their communities.

Seven Billion Liters of Clean Water

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Seven billion liters of water: That’s a big number, one that’s hard to imagine. But it has made the difference to at least 39,000 people who might have lost their lives to waterborne diseases over the past 10 years.

7 billion liters

Claudia’s family received CSDW’s 7 billionth liter of clean water. Photo courtesy of P&G.

In 2004, one of ChildFund’s partners, Procter & Gamble, started the nonprofit Children’s Safe Drinking Water program, which provides packets of water-purifying powder to families in the Americas, Asia and Africa who don’t have reliable access to clean water. Recently, CSDW passed the milestone of delivering its 7 billionth liter of clean water, to a family in one of ChildFund’s programs in Brazil. ChildFund has helped distribute the packets. Seven billion liters equal one liter of clean water for every single person in the world, and CSDW estimates that the program has prevented 300 million days of diarrheal disease and saved 39,000 lives.

The program is part of P&G’s Clinton Global Initiative pledge to help save one life an hour by 2020.To celebrate the milestone, P&G has launched a social media drive now through April 22 (Earth Day). Every time you use the hashtag #7billionliters on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram during this week, P&G will donate an additional liter of clean drinking water. They hope to provide 1 million more liters this week!

“This new program is one example of why ChildFund values its partnership with P&G,” says Anne Lynam Goddard, ChildFund’s president and CEO. “Clean water means a disruption of poverty. Thanks to our partnership with P&G, not only are we changing lives in Brazil, but in many countries around the world, from drought-affected areas of Kenya to areas impacted by natural disasters in Indonesia and Mozambique.”


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