ChildFund Alliance

South Korea: From Aid Recipient to Donor

By Je-Hoon Lee, President, ChildFund Korea

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Korea.

75th ChildFund logoIn 1948, the seed of love and sharing was sown for Korean children who were hungry and ragged, as China’s Children Fund began operations in Korea. That seed would take root and grow to become ChildFund Korea.

At the program’s beginning, 400 children lived in three orphanages started by Verent J. Mills, who was then CCF’s overseas director and later became executive director of the renamed Christian Children’s Fund. This support expanded during and after the Korean War, which raged from 1950 to 1953.

Dr. Mills in Korea

Dr. Verent Mills at a Korean orphanage in the 1950s.

During the period of political and social chaos before and during the war, CCF levied financial and human resources to rescue Korean children. In this age of instability, CCF did not leave the frontlines of child welfare but did its work quietly. For the next 38 years, CCF supported about 100,000 Korean children, allocating approximately $1 billion. Not only did the organization help war orphans at the beginning of its work, but it also helped children who were living at home with their parents.

In 1986, the Korean branch became independent from CCF because of high economic growth in the country, allowing it to become self-sustaining. The end of CCF’s economic support carries an important historical meaning in Korea’s development of child welfare. Since 1986, ChildFund Korea has been constantly changing and progressing as a nonprofit organization, providing sponsorship, foster care and child protection, as well as other necessary services for communities and families.   

With support from international organizations and the strong will and effort of Koreans, Korea has accomplished great economic growth. In the 1990s, Koreans formed a social consensus to help children in developing countries, prompting ChildFund Korea to work globally. Starting with Cambodia, Vietnam and Sri Lanka, we have supported children and families in 21 countries around the world since 1995.

South Sudan

ChildFund Korea President Je-Hoon Lee spends time with children in South Sudan.

To return the love and help that we have received at difficult times, ChildFund Korea took a further step by opening offices in South Sudan and North Korea. ChildFund Korea provided North Korean children with hygiene kits, nutritional food and clothing and built a bakery in Pyongyang that produced 10,000 loaves of bread every day from 2005 to 2009. Also, ChildFund Korea supported health care programs to reduce disease and improve the health of children in North Korea, and we continue to provide various services when possible.

During our global expansion, ChildFund Korea’s domestic programs shifted direction as well, adapting to changes in need and the social environment. As reported cases of physical and sexual violence against children increased, ChildFund Korea adapted the Child Assault Program from the United States and trained 259,559 students, teachers and parents at 600 schools, a total of 10,151 training sessions. So far, 603 CAP teachers have been certified.  

ChildFund Korea's Youngjin Park in Senegal.

ChildFund Korea’s Youngjin Park in Senegal.

In 2011, ChildFund Korea started an advocacy campaign called Nayoung’s Wish, named for a girl who lives with a disability after a sexual assault at the age of 8. ChildFund Korea submitted about 500,000 signatures to South Korea’s congress to promote the abolishment of the statute of limitations for sex crimes against minors and the disabled, which was pending in court at the time.

Finally, the statute was changed. ChildFund Korea has built on this success and is engaged in other advocacy campaigns related to school violence, bullying and child protection.

As we reach our own 65th anniversary, ChildFund Korea allocates more than 130 billion won (US$121 million) a year to support children, and we have more than 240,000 sponsors, 1,100 staff members and 70 program offices. ChildFund Korea has helped Koreans to be active participants in assisting children living in poverty and has strengthened the motivation of Koreans to support global programs, carrying on the legacy of Christian Children’s Fund.

We are honored to be a valuable member of Korean NGOs that emerged as donors after a time of being recipients of aid.

Ghana

Jung-eun Ok of ChildFund Korea plays with children in Ghana.

Ireland: Thanks to the Staff, Sponsors and Children of ChildFund

By Michael Kiely, CEO, ChildFund Ireland

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Ireland.

75th ChildFund logoSeptember 2013 marked my 10th year as chief executive officer of ChildFund Ireland. Throughout the past decade I have been lucky enough to witness immensely positive changes throughout both our own organisation and the wider ChildFund Alliance. This piece is far too short to mention them all, so I will share highlights from the past decade.

On the sponsorship front, we worked hard to streamline sponsorship funds and focus on 11 countries, as compared to 27 in 2003. This means we now can really see an impact that Irish sponsorship funds have on ChildFund work in the field. I have always been a great believer in child sponsorship. On a personal level, I am proud to have helped form the Sponsor Relations Network, which brings even greater efficiencies for the Alliance, our national offices and our sponsors.

Michael Kiely and president of Ireland

Michael Kiely (left) speaks with Ireland Pres. Michael D. Higgins, a supporter of ChildFund’s work.

In terms of grants, ChildFund Ireland received its first grant of €95,000 from Irish Aid in 2003 for a 12-month project in Kenya. In the intervening years, our relationship with Irish Aid has grown, and we now have a four-year multiannual funding agreement that focusses on early childhood development in three countries in Africa, building on the sponsorship-funded programme in the same areas.

Our first forays into the online world came in 2004 with the launch of our first website. This year, we carried out a major overhaul of the site. Visual appeal and navigability have been greatly improved through extensive use of colour, animation and a more intuitive layout, and a whole host of new features have been added. Our social media presence has progressed from limited use of a single platform (Facebook) in 2010 to daily updates on Twitter, photo-sharing on Pinterest and engaging an active community on Facebook.

Michael Kiely in Zavala, Mozambique

Michael in Mozambique with Moses.

In just the last few months, we have introduced a digital newsletter to share our favourite articles with supporters on our email database and created our first Facebook advertising campaign in aid of the ChildFund Alliance Free from Violence and Exploitation campaign. The combination of all of these efforts has meant that traffic to our website has roughly tripled, and readership of articles has multiplied from a few hundred to several thousand per article.

The economic situation in Ireland is well-publicised and has impacted ChildFund’s supporter base. However, perhaps due to the nature of child sponsorship, our cancellation rate has been well below what might have been expected. We are embracing the challenge, and I am indebted to the hard work of my team and the loyalty of our supporters during this difficult time.

Moreover, our increasing public profile means we are well placed to take advantage of the coming improvement in national economic fortunes. I, myself, have enjoyed every year of my time at ChildFund Ireland, and I look forward to many more.

Slán go foill … (good-bye for now).

New Global Strategy Focuses on Children’s Rights

By Florence Provendier, Executive Director, Un Enfant par la Main 

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of the 12 ChildFund Alliance groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from France. 

75th ChildFund logoUn Enfant par la Main was founded in 1990 by ChildFund International. Today, through sponsorships, we are supporting more than 7,000 children and almost 100 projects in 16 countries. 

After 23 years of work and engagement to help children who are impoverished, 2012 saw a dramatic change in our global strategy. We interviewed hundreds of sponsors, donors, volunteers, team members and other stakeholders in our organization to arrive at our key objectives of increasing sponsorships and funding, and to accurately measure the effects of our actions to promote children’s rights.

These objectives are based on our organizational values:

  • Solidarity: Building links between France and the communities we serve to enable children and their families to be self-sufficient. To reach this goal, we work with fellow ChildFund Alliance members to meet the true needs of families and communities.
  • Responsibility: In communities we serve, we seek to build awareness of the role community members have to play and their responsibilities. At the same time, we commit to evaluating the impact of our actions and being transparent.
  • Respect: Listening to and understanding sponsors to make their involvement easier; listening to and understanding supported children so that we may better meet their needs.

    Senegalese children

    Florence Provendier spends time with children in Senegal.

The first outcome of our strategy was the launching of a communication campaign called Aider un enfant, si ça compte pour moi, imaginez comme c’est concret pour lui. (Helping a child: If this matters to me, imagine how concrete it is for him.) The campaign focuses on the relationships between children and sponsors, highlighting the concrete effects of sponsorship on children’s lives. As the campaign launched, we also increased our digital presence with a new website, newsletter and increased social network engagement to reach our supporters.

As our organization makes strategic shifts, it is always with the desire to help more and more children to grow up and thrive in the best conditions and environment possible through sponsorship.

Going the Distance to Fight Violence Against Children

By Abraham Marca, ChildFund Bolivia

It was a cloudy Sunday morning in La Paz, Bolivia, and at 6 a.m., all you wanted to do was to stay in bed with hot chocolate and watch TV. But that Sunday, Dec. 8, we had something special in mind, and we had to wake up early and start moving.

We were not just running for ourselves but were running to promote the campaign, too.

Four staff members from ChildFund Bolivia’s office — Katerina Poppe, Ana Vacas, Fernando Arduz and I — and our pal HyeWon Lee from ChildFund Korea ran 21 kilometers (13.1 miles, or a half-marathon) that day. Aside from the pursuit of good fitness, our goal was to share awareness of the “Free From Violence” campaign, a global advocacy campaign by ChildFund Alliance asking governments to ensure that children are free from violence and exploitation.

ChildFund Bolivia runners

Our speedy staffers in Bolivia!

It was a very exciting, tiring but fruitful experience,” HyeWon notes. “We had a long, hard run of 21 kilometers ahead of us, but it felt really nice to be with the co-workers, one next to each other, cheering each other on and sharing the exciting moment together. 

“We were wearing ChildFund T-shirts with the phrase ´Libre de violencia´ [Free from Violence] printed on the back, and this short phrase really made our running much more meaningful. We were not just running for ourselves but were running to promote the campaign, too. It made it much harder to give up, and as a result, we all met at the finish line.”

running course in Bolivia

Runners take on the scenic half-marathon course in La Paz.

Ana also shared her thoughts: “I have run quite a few races before but never for a specific cause. However, this time was different. The race took on a whole new meaning for me; I was no longer there as another participant just hoping to cross the finish line but as someone who was actively participating in efforts to create a world where children are free from violence.”

Katerina added: “To be part of this competition was a wonderful experience for me because I believe in this cause. I believe that we all together can do something to raise our voices and share our commitment to fight violence against children, especially girls.”

That Sunday will be in our memories forever; if we can overcome this challenge, others in life can be defeated with an effort.

Love for Children Reaches Beyond Frontiers

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Japan.

By Takeshi Kobayashi, Executive Director, ChildFund Japan 

75th ChildFund logoLove reaches beyond national borders, as we know. In 1948, 65 years ago, when our grandparents were in their youth, Christian Children’s Fund (then known as China’s Children Fund) began assisting children in Japan, where postwar confusion continued. The situation of child-care institutions in Japan at that time was desperately severe. Most of the institutions could not provide children with nutritious food or clothes.

From Postwar Beginnings

The 1940s was a very difficult decade for Japan. There was World War II, and at its end in 1945, the country was in ruins. Many children lost their guardians and relatives. They were literally children living in the streets. CCF brought the love of people in the United States to these destitute Japanese children. CCF demonstrated that love can reach beyond international borders and save suffering children.

The Christian Child Welfare Association was established in 1952 with management assistance from CCF. One piece in a book called “Love Beyond the Frontier” about CCWA’s history attracted my attention. It was written by the director of a child care institution taking care of war orphans after World War II:

“In September of 1949, I received a notice that my institution would soon receive the first subsidy from CCF. Under the very difficult situation which we were in, this was a blessing shower from God. All the workers together with children, remembering sponsors of U.S., offered thanks giving prayers to God. With this donation, we were able to provide children with supplemental food, additional clothes and educational materials.” 

 

CCF Japan

A historical photo depicts a child-care center run by Christian Children’s Fund in Japan.

Assistance for Japan Meaningful in Several Ways

Japan was among the first recipients of CCF’s assistance. Moreover, ChildFund Japan is the first country office that became independent from Christian Children’s Fund in 1974, and in 1975, we started assisting marginalized children in the Philippines.

In 2005, we made an important decision to disunite from the Christian Child Welfare Association to focus on international development cooperation, although CCWA continues to serve children here in Japan. At that time, we joined the ChildFund Alliance as the 12th member organization. We were able to expand our assistance to children in Sri Lanka in 2006 in collaboration with ChildFund International, and in 2010, we began assisting children in Nepal through the sponsorship program. 

Sri Lanka

Takeshi Kobayashi with children in Sri Lanka during a recent visit.

As I look back, ChildFund Japan indeed demonstrates love beyond frontiers. Love that reaches beyond national borders is essential for assisting children in need around the world.

ChildFund Sweden Takes Strong Stance on Child Protection

By Carolina Ehrnrooth, Secretary General, Barnfonden (ChildFund Sweden)

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Sweden.

75th ChildFund logoSofia, 14, has a friendly smile and an air of confidence. She is the chairperson of the student parliament in her school in central Ethiopia. When she grows up, she hopes to be a doctor. But a year ago this dream was about to disappear.

Sofia’s stepfather and her mother wanted to send her to Saudi Arabia or another foreign country to work. They felt her income was needed to support the family, and this had a higher priority than her education. But Sofia managed to hold her ground. She had learned about the importance of education and the dangers connected with child migration in her youth club in school.

Sofia of Ethiopia

Sofia

Sofia spoke to her siblings and her teacher, who in turn spoke to her parents — and managed to change their minds. It was a close call because her stepfather had already arranged a false identity card stating her age as 18, and an application for a passport was the next step.

The situation could have turned out differently had Sofia’s school not been taking part in a three-year project working against harmful traditional practices (HTP). Barnfonden is supporting the project, working through ChildFund Ethiopia and a local partner organization.

Carolina Ehrnrooth

Carolina Ehrnrooth (center) at a school in Ethiopia.

Hundreds of village leaders, health workers, local officials, religious leaders and school headmasters are part of this project, which is aimed at changing attitudes and behaviors through information and education. The goal is to reach 20,000 children and youths, to increase their knowledge and awareness of the consequences of HTP, a broad definition that includes female circumcision, child marriage, heavy and dangerous child labor and child migration. The project is based in central Ethiopia, with many sponsored children.

Since Barnfonden was started 22 years ago by BØRNEfonden (ChildFund Denmark), we have managed to increase our support to children in need every year. We have developed from being mainly a sponsorship charity to a broader organization that has diverse fundraising sources and many activities that help children in need.  

Cambodian girls

Barnfonden began working in Cambodia in 2009.

With the help of the ChildFund Alliance, we have started advocacy efforts and raised our voice in the national arena for the causes of child protection and prevention of child violence. Today, we have 25,000 sponsors supporting 27,000 children in 25 countries. With the help of our sponsors, children in need are provided with education, better health care and the means and training to make a living on their own as adults.

To our delight, we also see an increase in funding from institutions and corporate partners, making it possible for us to support projects like the work against harmful traditional practices in Ethiopia. Our ultimate goal is to help even more children and families.

In everything we do, we remind ourselves about the children and families we are working for. And we remain grateful to our faithful sponsors, other supporters and corporate partners.

Important Dates in Barnfonden’s History

2005: Supported more than 20,000 sponsored children

2005: Started a dedicated project in Rajastan, India, in partnership with ChildFund International

2007: Received accreditation as the first member organization of ChildFund Alliance

2009: Started a partnership with ChildFund Australia and its programs in Cambodia

2011: Launched a designated project in Selingue, Mali, in partnership with BØRNEfonden

2011: Celebrated our 20th anniversary

2012: Began a project against harmful traditional practices (HTP) with ChildFund Ethiopia

2013: Supported a children’s rights project in Myanmar (Burma) in partnership with ChildFund Australia

2013: Currently supporting 27,000 sponsored children

Celebrating 75 Years of Lifesaving Work for Children

By Bolette Christensen, CEO, BØRNEfonden

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Denmark.

75th ChildFund logoWe at BØRNEfonden are very proud to be part of the long-lasting effort made by the members of ChildFund Alliance to ease the grip of poverty for local communities in Africa, Latin America and Asia. While we are now commemorating ChildFund International’s 75 years of important work, last year BØRNEfonden also reached an organizational milestone. We celebrated our 40th anniversary as the Danish representative of the ChildFund Alliance. Last year, as now, there is plenty to celebrate.

First of all, BØRNEfonden remains Denmark’s largest development organization financed by private funds. We have more than 45,000 sponsors supporting 65,000 children and their families in 25 countries.

Cambodia

Bolette Christensen with children in Cambodia. Photo: BØRNEfonden.

In recent years, our cooperation with private businesses has become an integral part of our work. Donations from private companies have increased 40 percent since 2010, and investing in development and job creation in Africa has become a matter of greater interest in the Danish private sector.

These numbers tell us that within the Danish population and business life, there is a strong confidence in the way BØRNEfonden works by focusing on long-term development.

Working in West Africa

Many of BØRNEfonden’s sponsors support children in countries where work on the ground is carried out by other members of the Alliance, and we greatly appreciate the collaboration. BØRNEfonden itself has opened offices in five West African countries. After opening in Cape Verde in the late 1980s, offices were established in Togo, Benin and Burkina Faso in the 1990s. In 2003, Mali became the most recent member of BØRNEfonden’s program countries.

Even though there have been many significant occasions worthy to mention here in all of our program countries, BØRNEfonden’s work in Cape Verde stands out.

Cape Verde children

Children in Cape Verde. Photo: Henrik A. Jensen.

In 1989, BØRNEfonden initiated its effort in Cape Verde, an island off the coast of West Africa. At that time nearly one-third of all children in the country didn’t start school, and 46 of every 1,000 didn’t live to celebrate their first birthday. Today, these numbers have improved significantly. Currently, 99 percent of all Cape Verdean children start school, and nine out of 10 finish primary school. Infant mortality has dropped to 29 out of 1,000, becoming one of the lowest rates in Africa. Due to the positive development, last year BØRNEfonden began a five-year phase-out of its efforts in Cape Verde, creating a path for leaders in the local community to carry on this work independently.

In 1989, the slogan for the work to be done in Cape Verde was ”Help to Self-Help.” Today in 2013, it is clear that the support from sponsors and donors has paid off in Cape Verde. Not only has this support given individual children and families better chances for a more hopeful future, but it has also contributed to the general development of the country.

As we look forward, this story is important to keep in mind. It reminds us that the work we do actually does work.

Inspired to Help Children in Need

By Joern Ziegler and Antje Becker, Chief Executive Officers, ChildFund Deutschland 

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Germany.

In 1978, ChildFund Deutschland was established as CCF Kinderhilfswerk (translated from German as “children’s fund”) through the initiative of Karin Astrid Greiner, a Dutch woman married to a German. During an extended stay in Brazil, she witnessed the important work of Christian Children’s Fund. 

Antje Becker

Antje Becker (center)

Back in Germany, she and some friends laid the cornerstone for a child sponsorship organization. CCF Kinderhilfswerk’s foundation era, characterized by a steady growth in sponsorship numbers, lasted till 1993. By then, the organization had grown into full self-financing autonomy. In the following years, ChildFund Deutschland identified new partners in developing countries — genuine nongovernmental organizations in their countries that were not part of an international network. 

This type of collaboration — an early beginning to our support of civil society organizations in developing countries — led to many years of close cooperation with organizations in Latvia, Lithuania, Burundi and Congo. Although Latvia and Lithuania are now members of the European Union, which has allowed their partner organizations to support themselves, Burundi and Congo continue to be important program countries for ChildFund Deutschland, with many children in desperate need for support.

Joern Ziegler in Vietnam

Joern Ziegler in Vietnam.

During the 1990s, a group of supporters in Northern Italy established an organization to raise funds for ChildFund Deutschland’s activities. Today, this association is well-established as ChildFund Suedtirol and remains associated with ChildFund Deutschland, contributing reliably to the well-being of children. ChildFund Suedtirol’s board made the decision not to establish an administration of its own but to rely on the services available through ChildFund Deutschland. 

In 2001, ChildFund Deutschland´s board made a strategic decision to expand the funding and program portfolio of our organization. In addition to the classic child sponsorship system, we built up non-sponsorship donations and grants from the German government and the European Union by 30 percent within five years. 

75th ChildFund logoThis has allowed more support for more children in more countries. The new approach has led to new partnerships and new activities in a number of East European countries, especially in Ukraine. Our cooperation with a committed Ukrainian partner organization has continued for many years and gives us hope for more support of needy Ukrainian children and youth. 

In recent years, ChildFund Deutschland became a founding member and committed supporter of the global ChildFund Alliance. In 2009, we changed our name to ChildFund Deutschland, a step to underline the importance of the global ChildFund Alliance, to make the overall branding more visible and to spread the word about ChildFund’s important work. ChildFund Korea and ChildFund Deutschland were the first two non-English-speaking organizations to introduce the English words ChildFund as part of their names.

Operationally, ChildFund Deutschland closely cooperates with most of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member organizations, the most important partner being ChildFund International. At the same time, we give attention and invest more effort to support partner organizations that are not yet members of the Alliance, especially in the Southern Hemisphere and Eastern Europe.

ChildFund Deutschland

A staff meeting at ChildFund Deutschland.

As we look to the future, ChildFund Deutschland is working to identify new innovative models of funding, programming and partnerships. Part of this process has been the establishment of ChildFund Stiftung, a foundation accepting endowments and building up capital to support ChildFund’s work. Partnerships and other activities within Germany are also part of the plan.

Despite great progress in many areas and countries, achieved through the tireless efforts of many people, thousands and thousands of children continue to need the committed support of donors, sponsors and NGOs. ChildFund Deutschland is willing and ready to meet this challenge!

Children Voice Concerns and Ideas in Small Voices, Big Dreams Survey

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Children are interested in law and order, according to ChildFund Alliance’s 2013 Small Voices, Big Dreams survey. We asked 6,500 children ages 10 to 12 in 47 countries about violence, peace, happiness and their heroes, in the fourth year of this global project.

One question was about what they would do if they were in charge of their country. One in three children said they would create stronger anti-violence laws. Three in four believe violence is caused by bad behavior, poverty or alcohol and drugs.

Shravan

Shravan (center) and his two younger siblings.

Shravan, 11, of India, says that he would enact “a new stringent law to punish all those who commit crimes on children. I would have police arrest and punish those who ever tease girls while going to school. I would stop the sale of alcohol as it fuels much violence in villages.”

And 40 percent of children in Sierra Leone say they would guarantee children’s personal safety, a high priority for children in Ethiopia and Guatemala as well.

Children also weighed in on what they think is the most important issue for them and their families, a question on the United Nations My World Survey, which is helping global leaders define post-2015 development goals.

A good education is important to 65 percent of the children who answered, with protection against crime and violence, gender equality and better health care also ranking high.

Pedro of Timor-Leste

Pedro and his rooster.

“When the rain comes and floods, I cannot go to school,” says Pedro, 12, of Timor-Leste, where 80 percent of children say everyone should get a good education. “I feel sad because I have no chance to learn new lessons.”

Children also shared who their heroes are. It may come as no surprise that family members are heroes for almost half of the respondents, with political leaders and activists coming in at a distant second place. Superman is a hero to 13 percent of Paraguay respondents.

Hearing children’s voices and opinions on important issues is critical to ChildFund’s mission, as we work to help children become empowered, independent and successful adults.

Taiwan’s Journey to Self-Reliance and Outreach to Other Countries

By Betty Ho, CEO of Taiwan Fund for Children and Families

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Taiwan.

75th ChildFund logoTo help homeless Chinese children after the Sino-Japanese war, Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke, a Presbyterian minister, established the China’s Children Fund in 1938 in Richmond, Va., which would later become Christian Children’s Fund. CCF began assisting orphans, children and families in Taiwan in 1950, bringing nutritional, health and educational services to an impoverished population. In 1964, the CCF Taiwan field office was formally established, and 23 Family Helper Projects were set up to provide services to children and families in need.

In 1985, Chinese Children’s Fund/Taiwan became fully independent from Christian Children’s Fund after the eight-year Self-Reliant Plan implemented by our CEO, Charles Kuo. Two years later, CCF/Taiwan started to provide sponsorships for children in foreign countries, and in Taiwan, we started our Child Protection Program. 

Betty Ho with children

Betty Ho (right) with two children in Taiwan’s programs.

In 2002, we changed our name to Taiwan Fund for Children and Families. TFCF is a nonprofit organization entrusted by the government and supported by the public for more than 63 years, when Christian Children’s Fund entered the country. In the early 2000s, we also recognized that it was time for TFCF to extend a helping hand to children in need outside of Taiwan. We established a branch office in Mongolia in 2004, and the Kyrgyzstan and Swaziland branch offices were respectively established in 2012 and 2013. We also cooperated with local nongovernmental organizations to provide community programs in 2011 in China’s Shaan Xi Province.

Here’s an overview of TFCF’s programs:

Domestic Children Sponsorship

Supporting children in need is our commitment to society. This program applies the sponsorship system to provide children from low-income families with monthly subsidies and opportunities to continue their education. The program also aims to empower sponsored children and their families to pursue their independence. Over the past 63 years, we have helped 180,243 children become self-reliant.

Foreign Children Sponsorship

Kyrgyzstan

Betty (second from left) with Taiwan board members and children in Kyrgyzstan.

We aim to assist foreign children and families in need through our collaboration with the ChildFund Alliance. Projects and programs have been designed with a focus on children’s needs, such as the nurturing, medication, academic assistance and vocational training. TFCF also cares about establishing a functional and constructive community to effectively help local residents.

Child Protection Program

This program is designated to help children who have suffered physical, sexual or mental abuse or were seriously neglected. We have provided these children with rehabilitation and placement services since 1988. To raise public awareness and provide education on child protection issues, we set up the first Child Protection Resource Center in Taiwan in April 1998.

Early Intervention Program

Taiwan board and staff

Staff and board members from Taiwan.

To better assist developmentally delayed children or those living with other disabilities, we started the Early Intervention Program in 1996 to provide counseling, day care, referrals and other resources for affected families.

Foster Care Program

We initiated our foster care program in 1983, a program offered to children who are abused or unable to be cared for by their families.

Our dream is for all children to live in a happy and sound environment, and we are pleased to join with the ChildFund Alliance to be a global force for children in need. 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 921 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter