ChildFund Alliance

A Space Just for Angola’s Children and Youth

Reporting by Bernardo Florindo, ChildFund Angola

A few weeks ago, ChildFund Angola opened a new children’s resource center in the Olonjuli project area. It’s the first of its kind for the community, and cause for celebration.

Community members

ChildFund staff greets community members and dignitaries.

A large number of community members turned out for the grand opening, which drew Angola’s vice administrator for education, local officials, Benguela National Radio and a Benguela TV station.

“The resource center is one contribution ChildFund Angola is making to help the government bring a better future to this community, especially for children,” said Benjamin Tchiyevo, ChildFund’s national director in Angola. He urged the community to take the center “with its two hands and preserve it.”

computer stationos

Computers with Internet access.

Built with funding from ChildFund Germany’s Learn and Play grant, the center features an entertainment space, computer stations and a library – all priorities for the community’s children and youth.

boy with book

New books and learning materials for children.

Through the Olonjuli project, ChildFund will lead and promote a number of center activities including story times, art and theater. The center’s entertainment corner offers games and toys, while the library encourages reading and quiet study time. Students and community members can use the computer center to access the Internet and to write and print documents.

toys and games

Toys and games for recreation.

With no other center like this in Baia-Farta, children, teachers and parents are welcoming the new opportunities for learning and creative expression that have finally come to their community.

Around the Globe with ChildFund in 31 Days: Giving Hope to Zambian Children with Disabilities

by Priscilla Chama, ChildFund Zambia

31 in 31 logoOver the course of January’s 31 days, we’re making a blog stop in each country where we serve children, thanks to the generous support of our sponsors and donors. Today, we meet Matildah, a youth with disabilities, who realized her dream of competing in an athletic competition.

“I felt so grateful, humbled and honored to be crowned with a gold medal for best athlete of the year, contrary to what many people think about us, the disabled,” says Matildah, a 15-year-old Zambian. “That moment made me realize that I can do all that the so-called able, normal people can do, and I hope to do better than this next time,” she says.

Youth with family members

Matildah (second from right) and her family members.

Orphaned at an early age, Matildah is one of several hundred children with special needs who are benefiting from ChildFund Zambia’s Special Education Needs (SEN) project in Luangwa district, with support from ChildFund New Zealand. Luangwa has more than 300 children with special needs, who initially had no access to education. ChildFund Zambia has constructed classrooms, dormitories and teacher housing to create a positive learning environment for children. It’s made a world of difference for Matildah and her classmates, who are increasingly confident of their abilities.

A strong runner, Matildah was an eager participant in Zambia’s 2011 provincial athletics competition open to children with special needs from Lusaka, Luangwa and Kafue districts. The competition was held at the Olympic Youth Development Center in Lusaka.

“I love athletics but had no platform to showcase my talent. That is why I am so grateful that the organizers arranged a competition in which children with various disabilities like me could participate,” she says.

youth with gold medal

Bringing home gold.

Matildah outclassed other competitors and placed first in both the 50- and 100-meter events. She beams with excitement as she recalls the experience of the competition and interacting with fellow athletes.

“Most of us were given an opportunity to travel outside Luangwa for the first time since we were born,” she notes. “As you know children like us are always kept indoors, but this is now changing because of the school for children with special needs,” she explains.

Matildah admits that just a few years ago she had no hope of ever getting an education. According to her grandmother, Matildah’s cognitive difficulties since birth meant she could not be enrolled in a regular classroom.

Her big breakthrough came when ChildFund introduced the SEN project, and Matilda was one of the first children registered. Matildah now attends school at Mwavi Basic, where she is enrolled in the special education unit and is in the second level.

“I want to finish school and become a teacher for children with special needs,”
Matildah says. For now, she loves going to school and also gardening. And, of course, there’s running.

Discover more about ChildFund’s programs in Zambia and how you can sponsor a child.

ChildFund Japan Reminds Tsunami Survivors: We Are With You!

by Kate Nare, ChildFund Marketing Specialist

The devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11 left hundreds of thousands of families homeless, and hundreds of children orphaned.

Following this disaster, ChildFund Japan, with the help of child sponsors and other ChildFund Alliance members – including ChildFund International, was able to quickly create an emergency and reconstruction plan to help the hard-hit community of Ofunato, located in the Iwate jurisdiction.

Response included the delivery of emergency goods, psychological care and grief workshops and other community development projects. ChildFund Japan soon became a lead agency supporting children with counselling services to address the psychological effects of the tsunami and the loss of family members.

Last summer, local government officials asked ChildFund Japan to help build a sense of community in the temporary housing units where many displaced families were living in Ofunato. The goal was to create a space where residents could gather, have tea and socialize, with the key message being: We are with you! You are not alone!

Volunteers from the local university joined carpenters and community members to build colorful benches and tables to serve as a meeting place for the residents. Shortly thereafter, preparations began for a summer festival. Five months after the tsunami, residents were able to find enjoyment in socializing with their new neighbors and reconnecting with community.

Additionally, ChildFund Japan implemented a grief counseling program for teachers to deliver as they continue to interact with students who were in class on the day the tsunami hit, forcing them to flee for their lives. Today, an after-school daycare center provides children with a safe environment where they can once again laugh and play.

One child said, “Since we became victims, the after-school child center changed and became a bit quiet. But my friends are more cheerful now and that’s good.”

Although recovery and rehabilitation continue, these children are a symbol of hope and resiliency for Japan.

View a video from ChildFund Japan highlighting the emergency relief and development work following the earthquake and tsunami.

Children Dream Big Even When Facing Harsh Realities

by LaTasha Chambers, ChildFund Communications Associate

Despite living in some of the most impoverished areas of the world, children remain optimistic about their futures, according to a new survey commissioned by the ChildFund Alliance.

The second annual Small Voices, Big Dreams global survey provides insight into the minds of some of the world’s most vulnerable and overlooked children from 44 countries.

Almost one in two children in developing countries is focused on a future career requiring a college education, recognizing that education can break the cycle of poverty. One-fifth (22.5 percent) of children who live in developing countries would like to be teachers when they grow up, while 20 percent want to be doctors.

Ethiopian girlHowever, with these children’s optimism comes the reality of daily encounters with crime, hunger and disease. One 11-year-old from Ethiopia shares, “One thing I mostly worry about is HIV/AIDS.” Answers like this from children living in developing countries were not uncommon and reveal the plight many of them face.

By contrast, children in developed countries who participated in the survey expressed few fears – illness and receiving an inadequate education were almost foreign to them. A majority of children in developed nations aspire to be athletes and artists.

“American children have the luxury of setting their career hopes high, but those in developing countries are focused on the single best way to disrupt the cycle of poverty — education, says Anne Lynam Goddard, president and CEO of ChildFund International. “What gives these children, as young as 10 years old, the permission to dream is the recognition that improving their lives is tied closely to the opportunity to learn. Sadly, for too many of these children, that opportunity does not exist. That is why so many ChildFund Alliance member organizations focus so much of our efforts on education.”

In the U.S. the dream of becoming whatever you want to be, even the president of the country, is so real because of the many opportunities that exist.

Afghanistan girlWhen children in developing countries were asked what they would do if they were the leader of their countries, a young girl in Afghanistan responded: “I will not be able to become the president of the Afghanistan, as a woman doesn’t have the right to be the president of Afghanistan.”

We still have much work to do ensure children everywhere are able not only to dream the biggest dream but also to make those dreams reality.

Turning the Tide for Teens in a Jakarta Slum

Guest post by Jacqui Ooi, Senior Communications Officer, ChildFund Australia

Earlier this month, I met a really lovely guy in a really grim Jakarta slum. Ahmad is 20 years old and lives in one of Jakarta’s toughest neighbourhoods. Located near the airport with planes flying low and loud overhead, the area is a mess of garbage, cramped alleyways and broken, makeshift houses. The roads leading in are so narrow that two cars can barely pass.

Youth in street

Ahmad

Ahmad was a sponsored child until last year when he finished his schooling. Where he comes from, that in itself is a massive achievement. Most kids in Ahmad’s neighbourhood drop out of school at 16, if not before. While primary and junior high school in Indonesia are free, the fees for senior high school put it out of reach for many.

Friendly and easy-going, Ahmad is now working as an “office boy” – sweeping and mopping floors, making drinks and buying food for the employees. I have to admit, it doesn’t sound like much at first. Ahmad himself tells me: “It’s not my ideal job but I’ll take it.” Yet after discovering more about life for teens in the Jakarta slums I’ve realised that Ahmad is on a much better path than most.

While young people in Australia can generally take education and jobs for granted, it’s certainly not the case for their peers in Jakarta’s poor neighbourhoods. By the age of 16, many of the kids have dropped out of school and are working underage in factories. Others turn to drugs or prostitution.

Ahmad being interviewedAhmad tells me: “It’s hard living in Jakarta. There are lots of issues like drugs and free sex (sex outside of marriage). For me, it’s a problem seeing kids in my neighbourhood who tend to just hang out, drinking.”

Being sponsored and involved with ChildFund kept Ahmad in school and out of trouble. “My sponsor helped me with my school fees,” he says. “At the start of each new school year, I also got books.”

youth and ChildFund Australia staff

Ahmad and Jacqui

Ahmad has also attended ChildFund-supported trainings about drug education, HIV prevention and public speaking. He says: “The training helped with my confidence. I know how to mix with the right people and pick good friends. I live in an area with drugs, so I make sure I hang out with good people.”

At the end of our conversation, Ahmad mentions he loves interacting with kids and I suggest maybe he could study to become a teacher. “Maybe,” he ponders, but I’m later told teachers don’t earn much. His “office boy” wage of $115 per month would be about the same.

For now Ahmad is content to be employed and paying off his moped, which he uses to weave his way to work in Jakarta’s infamous traffic.

“I am happy because I have friends and a supportive family,” he says. “But I hope one day that I will have a better job and continue my studies.”

Q&A with Pierre Jablon of Un Enfant par la Main

by Selamawit Yilma, Communications Officer, ChildFund Ethiopia

Un Enfant par la Main, based in France, is a member of the ChildFund Alliance. The 12-member global organization, which includes ChildFund International, provides assistance to children in 59 countries.  Chairman of the Board Pierre Jablon recently led a sponsor visit to Ethiopia.

Photo of Pierre Jablon

Pierre Jablon, chairman of the board, Un Enfant par la Main, a member of the ChildFund Alliance.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Would you please tell us a little about your organization?
Pierre Jablon: Un Enfant par la Main is a member of ChildFund Alliance and is based in France. The name Un Enfant par la Main refers to the linkage between the mother and child, and it has an English translation of “holding a child’s hand.” Established in 1990, the organization is involved in about 15 countries including Ethiopia. Ethiopia is the third [largest] country with regard to the number of sponsored children we have, next to Mali and Senegal.

ChildFund Ethiopia: What is your impression of Ethiopia in general?
Jablon: I am impressed very much by the people I see on the street and have met on our field visits. The people are so kind, smiling. They also have sense of dedication to welcome others.

ChildFund Ethiopia: What is the purpose of organizing the group of sponsors from France to visit Ethiopia?
Jablon: The first objective was to better understand what ChildFund Ethiopia is doing and how you are organized — to learn more about the system of sponsorship and financing and to know what challenges you are facing. The second objective was to be a witness to the event while sponsors meet their children and share their feeling.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Did anything strike you differently than you expected?
Jablon: I was not completely aware of the development of the association and the system used to organize the communities, which encourages them to take over the responsibility and be engaged more in the community work. Other countries also work closely with the community, but the system I noticed here is very impressive.

ChildFund Ethiopia: What was the feeling of the sponsors while they visited their sponsored children and learned about some of the interventions of our partners? Was it interesting for them?
Jablon: It was an important moment in their lives. For most of them, it was their first time to meet their sponsored children so it was a very significant event for them. They were very happy, emotional and positive. We would like to organize similar visits at least once a year but one of our barriers to sending sponsors to Ethiopia was the language problem. Most of our sponsors speak only French so they need a translator. But this time, they were happy because they were able to converse with their children and their families with the help of the team and the translator.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Is there any other expectation from the sponsors that we need to improve more in the future?
Jablon: Some of the concerns mentioned by the sponsors were to receive pictures of their sponsored children more frequently to see their physical change and growth. It is also important to have up-to-date information of the children as well as news flashes on what activities are successful for the children, families and community. Strengthening communication is important to all sponsors, and most sponsors had positive feedback on ChildFund’s sponsor activities.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Un Enfant par la Main delegated you to lead the team to visit ChildFund Ethiopia. Can you share with us a few thoughts on how your board members, and you as a chairman, are actively involved in supporting the organization and what motivates you to work on behalf of children?
Jablon: Let me start with myself. I joined Un Enfant par la Main in 2006. Before I came to this organization, I used to work with UNICEF France. I was involved in many similar activities there, like talking with children in school and doing promotional and communication work. However, I was looking for an organization that has international collaboration and is smaller in size, enabling me to understand how the donated resources reach the children and to see the impact at the individual level. I found all this in Un Enfant par la Main. The important moment for me is being here, and in other countries, is to meet ChildFund staff, introduce our organization and meet children supported through Un Enfant par la Main. Though we are small organization, we want to be closest with our partners.

Regarding to the board activity, most of them are very active and have different responsibilities such as fundraising, coordination of regional volunteer workers and raising the profile of Un Enfant par la Main through various meetings and other opportunities.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Currently Un Enfant par la Main has about 450 sponsored children in Ethiopia. Is there any plan to increase this number or enhance the partnership between Un Enfant par la Main and ChildFund Ethiopia to help children in Ethiopia?
Jablon: I have discussed this issue with the national director and agreed that if there is room to increase the number of sponsored children, we would like to do that. In addition, we would like to strengthen our partnership by starting micro projects in communities where Un Enfant par la Main sponsored children live. As I observed from my visit, micro–enterprise opportunities exist and have a positive impact of increasing family income.

ChildFund Ethiopia: Do you want to add any more?
Jablon: I would like to thank the team from ChildFund Ethiopia. It was a really fantastic welcome and excellent cooperation. I hope we could also do more to inform and motivate the sponsors from France. In the future, we may also prepare another trip since this trip has been so successful.

Small Voices, Big Dreams

The Small Voices, Big Dreams survey, conducted by the ChildFund Alliance, asked more than 3,000 children worldwide some simple questions.

We believe their answers will touch your heart.

Does International Aid Work?

by Anne Lynam Goddard, ChildFund President and CEO

As dollars flow from developed nations to developing nations, the question often comes up: Does international aid really work?

I can give you an example of where it really has made a world of difference.

Recently I visited Taiwan to participate in the 60th anniversary celebration of Taiwan Fund for Children and Families (TFCF). ChildFund (then Christian Children’s Fund) began assisting orphans, children and families in Taiwan in 1950, bringing nutritional, health and educational services to an impoverished population.

With this life-sustaining support, Taiwan’s children began to thrive. In 1985, TFCF became an independent child sponsorship organization. ChildFund had helped for 35 years; yet, more important, we left behind this wonderful capacity. By 1987, TFCF was ready to give back to the world, and Taiwanese citizens began sponsoring children internationally. This compassion has spread to 34 countries in Asia, Africa and the Americas, helping more than 67,000 children along the way. Today TFCF is a member of the ChildFund Alliance, working in full partnership with ChildFund International and 10 other countries to assist vulnerable children globally.

Within its own country, TFCF continues to do terrific work — from introducing the foster care concept to developing state-of-the-art programs for special needs children, including a light therapy program.

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou (front row center) meets with the delegation representing Taiwan Fund for Children and Families and the ChildFund Alliance.

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou, who met with TFCF and ChildFund Alliance members to help celebrate TFCF’s anniversary, noted that TFCF is the oldest and likely the most effective social welfare organization caring for children in Taiwan. In fact, the president is a child sponsor and has sponsored 10 children through the years. He’s especially proud that close to 1 percent of Taiwan’s population is now sponsoring children.

President Ma pointed out that TFCF’s success story mirrors Taiwan’s rise as a nation. In the 1950s, the country was on the receiving end of aid provided by foreign governments and other public- and private-sector entities. At that time, President Ma said, the average annual income per person was $100. By 1965, Taiwan no longer needed international aid as it grew its own economy and expanded its exports. Today the average Taiwanese citizen earns $15,000.

International development has paid off — it’s worked. Taiwan’s foreign policy focus on humanitarian assistance is one means of giving back while extending the nation’s standing in the world community.

At one of the anniversary events, we heard from a former sponsored child. His father had died; his mother had no education, and she had four children to feed. A sponsor’s support “changed fate for our family,” he said. Today, this man is a bank manager and a child sponsor. For a banker, return on investment (ROI) is always top of mind, yet he personally believes that the highest ROI that you can get is by focusing on a child and the education of that child.

Child sponsorship played an important role in helping Taiwan get back on its feet.
Sponsorship is an investment in the capacity of people. That’s our focus at ChildFund — providing the greatest ROI.

Leadership Program Cause for Reflection, Growth

by Cynthia Price
Director of Communications

For the past week, 11 colleagues and I were immersed in building our leadership skills. It was a week of growth and getting to know each other in Bangkok, Thailand. We came from all of ChildFund’s regions, and one participant came from the ChildFund Alliance.

The Building Leaders Program (BLP) meant different things to each of us.

Participants in the Building Leaders Program

Billy Abimbilla of Liberia says the linkage among the Myers Brigg Type Indicator preferences, job placement and career planning was a wonderful eye opener. “BLP is a unique learning program with regard to its content and approach and offers flexible space for individual self-assessment and reflection abut the past, present and future,” he says.

“The BLP exceeded my expectations,” says Dennis O’Brien of the Philippines. “Not only did I learn more about myself and my learning style, but I got valuable and insightful feedback from the facilitators. But the impressions I leave the BLP with that are the strongest, are of the colleagues and fellow participants from around the ChildFund world. Some people I already knew, I got to know better, while some I met for the first time. Thanks to everyone for providing excellent perspective, ideas and experiences.”

And Julien Anseau of Thailand says, “For me, the BLP was about stepping out of my comfort zone, being stretched intellectually and emotionally, connecting with great people and choosing to be a leader.

“I want my leadership success to be measured by my legacy, by what I leave behind; real outcomes and the development of my people. I commit to becoming a student of leadership, being a leader in my professional and private life, and leveraging the investment made in me by developing other leaders in the organization.”

The ChildFund symbol

As for me, I am reenergized and recommitted to putting ChildFund on the map so that we help more children thrive. And that’s what BLP was about – helping each of us thrive so that collectively we can help the world’s children.

Sights and Sounds of India: A Carnival for the Senses

by Nicole Duciaume
ChildFund Regional Sponsorship Coordinator
Americas Regional Office

Over the past 15 years, I’ve lived in and traveled throughout Latin America and even spent some short work assignments in Africa as well. But now, for the first time, I am in Asia—in Chennai, India, to be exact.

I am here representing ChildFund International’s Americas Regional Office at the ChildFund Alliance Sponsor Relations Network meeting. This is a unique opportunity for ChildFund Alliance members (Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Sweden, Taiwan and the United States) to come together to discuss priority issues to improve our sponsorship efforts and operations in our program countries around the world. We share best practices and lessons learned and help set priorities for the coming year.

I left Panama and nearly 30 hours later arrived in Chennai. After getting some rest, I set out on Sunday morning to explore the area in a tuk-tuk (a three-wheeled, open-air scooter cab, of sorts). From my first hours in India, I can share that India is a carnival for the senses:

• Spice smells abound, wafting through the morning air.
• People are spilling out of stores, in the roads and out of bus windows.
• Horns are honking while bikes, mopeds, tuk-tuks, buses and vehicles weave through the streets.
• Roadside peddlers sell fruit, fish, vegetables, tires, sugarcane crushed into juice and coconut milk.
• Sunshine peeks out from behind the buildings and over the trees.
• Tile mosaics decorate walls, and even highway underpasses.
• Vibrant colors are everywhere — from Bollywood posters to political ads to colorful saris (not just red and blue, but fuchsia and turquoise; not just green and orange, but chartreuse and amber).
• Intricate religious shrines, decked with fresh flower garlands, are on several city corners.
• Storefronts sell electronics, fabrics, photocopies, jewelry, money transfers and meat.
• Green takes the form of trees, shrubs, flowers and city parks.
• Everyone seems to wear sandals…thin, worn and rugged.
• Cows stand idle on the sidewalks just outside ornate doors and gates.

Tomorrow we are visiting a ChildFund project community, followed by three days of conference presentations, discussions, debates and opportunities.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 876 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter