ChildFund Japan

Love for Children Reaches Beyond Frontiers

To commemorate ChildFund’s 75th anniversary, we invited the leaders of each of the 12 ChildFund Alliance member groups to reflect on the past and future of their own organizations and the Alliance. Today, we hear from Japan.

By Takeshi Kobayashi, Executive Director, ChildFund Japan 

75th ChildFund logoLove reaches beyond national borders, as we know. In 1948, 65 years ago, when our grandparents were in their youth, Christian Children’s Fund (then known as China’s Children Fund) began assisting children in Japan, where postwar confusion continued. The situation of child-care institutions in Japan at that time was desperately severe. Most of the institutions could not provide children with nutritious food or clothes.

From Postwar Beginnings

The 1940s was a very difficult decade for Japan. There was World War II, and at its end in 1945, the country was in ruins. Many children lost their guardians and relatives. They were literally children living in the streets. CCF brought the love of people in the United States to these destitute Japanese children. CCF demonstrated that love can reach beyond international borders and save suffering children.

The Christian Child Welfare Association was established in 1952 with management assistance from CCF. One piece in a book called “Love Beyond the Frontier” about CCWA’s history attracted my attention. It was written by the director of a child care institution taking care of war orphans after World War II:

“In September of 1949, I received a notice that my institution would soon receive the first subsidy from CCF. Under the very difficult situation which we were in, this was a blessing shower from God. All the workers together with children, remembering sponsors of U.S., offered thanks giving prayers to God. With this donation, we were able to provide children with supplemental food, additional clothes and educational materials.” 

 

CCF Japan

A historical photo depicts a child-care center run by Christian Children’s Fund in Japan.

Assistance for Japan Meaningful in Several Ways

Japan was among the first recipients of CCF’s assistance. Moreover, ChildFund Japan is the first country office that became independent from Christian Children’s Fund in 1974, and in 1975, we started assisting marginalized children in the Philippines.

In 2005, we made an important decision to disunite from the Christian Child Welfare Association to focus on international development cooperation, although CCWA continues to serve children here in Japan. At that time, we joined the ChildFund Alliance as the 12th member organization. We were able to expand our assistance to children in Sri Lanka in 2006 in collaboration with ChildFund International, and in 2010, we began assisting children in Nepal through the sponsorship program. 

Sri Lanka

Takeshi Kobayashi with children in Sri Lanka during a recent visit.

As I look back, ChildFund Japan indeed demonstrates love beyond frontiers. Love that reaches beyond national borders is essential for assisting children in need around the world.

After Japan’s Tsunami, a Glimmer of Hope

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

From ChildFund Japan, one of our ChildFund Alliance partners, comes a touching video about how the seaside city of Ofunato is recovering from the deadly earthquake and tsunami that occurred on March 11, 2011. “The Garland of Smiles,” which focuses on ChildFund’s people-centered approaches to healing and rebuilding, is nearly 22 minutes long, yet if you are interested in seeing what has happened in the aftermath of the tsunami, it’s well worth viewing.

More than 15,000 people in Japan died as a result of the disaster, and as we see in the video, numerous homes and buildings were destroyed, forcing as many as 8,000 people in Ofunato to live in temporary housing. It’s in this makeshift community where we meet ChildFund Japan project manager Yoshikazu Funato, who oversaw many initiatives to bring back some normalcy to children and adults.

ChildFund Japan, which normally assists children and families in the Philippines and Nepal, had to focus its energy inward after the disaster. With financial support from other ChildFund Alliance members, including ChildFund International, ChildFund Japan concentrated its activities in Ofunato because outside support was less available there than in other stricken areas. Beginning its work in the weeks after the earthquake and tsunami with a variety of volunteers and staff, ChildFund completed its projects in March 2013.

In preparation for the rebuilding, Funato and others conducted a door-to-door survey to see what Ofunato’s residents wanted and needed most. Some projects were small — building wooden benches in the temporary communities to promote socializing — while others were more ambitious, like providing grief counseling to preschoolers and creating a collective farm that keeps residents supplied with healthy food.

As a result of ChildFund Japan’s work throughout the past two years, some residents in temporary housing became invested in the improvements, from working at the farm to taking part in a residents’ association.

As you’ll see in the video, Ofunato has undergone a transformation in the past 24 months — not just physically but in attitude as well.

ChildFund Japan Reminds Tsunami Survivors: We Are With You!

by Kate Nare, ChildFund Marketing Specialist

The devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11 left hundreds of thousands of families homeless, and hundreds of children orphaned.

Following this disaster, ChildFund Japan, with the help of child sponsors and other ChildFund Alliance members – including ChildFund International, was able to quickly create an emergency and reconstruction plan to help the hard-hit community of Ofunato, located in the Iwate jurisdiction.

Response included the delivery of emergency goods, psychological care and grief workshops and other community development projects. ChildFund Japan soon became a lead agency supporting children with counselling services to address the psychological effects of the tsunami and the loss of family members.

Last summer, local government officials asked ChildFund Japan to help build a sense of community in the temporary housing units where many displaced families were living in Ofunato. The goal was to create a space where residents could gather, have tea and socialize, with the key message being: We are with you! You are not alone!

Volunteers from the local university joined carpenters and community members to build colorful benches and tables to serve as a meeting place for the residents. Shortly thereafter, preparations began for a summer festival. Five months after the tsunami, residents were able to find enjoyment in socializing with their new neighbors and reconnecting with community.

Additionally, ChildFund Japan implemented a grief counseling program for teachers to deliver as they continue to interact with students who were in class on the day the tsunami hit, forcing them to flee for their lives. Today, an after-school daycare center provides children with a safe environment where they can once again laugh and play.

One child said, “Since we became victims, the after-school child center changed and became a bit quiet. But my friends are more cheerful now and that’s good.”

Although recovery and rehabilitation continue, these children are a symbol of hope and resiliency for Japan.

View a video from ChildFund Japan highlighting the emergency relief and development work following the earthquake and tsunami.

Visiting with Children and Families after the Storms in the Philippines

This week, we’ll be bringing you reports directly from the Philippines, where the ChildFund Alliance is meeting for business sessions and ChildFund project visits.

By Cheri Dahl
Vice President, Communications and Public Affairs

It’s close to midnight when I exit the Manila airport. Even at this late hour the air is hot, thick and moist — a big departure from the crisp fall temperatures I left behind in Virginia more than 24 hours ago. I’ve come to the Philippines to meet with ChildFund Alliance colleagues from 11 countries and to collaborate on how best to help deprived, excluded and vulnerable children.

I see a familiar face at the baggage claim. Hiroshima, a board member from ChildFund Japan and his wife Mae Grace are here. Hiroshima teaches social work at a university in Tokyo. “MG,” as his wife is called, is Filipino.

We exit the airport and catch a waiting shuttle to our hotel. I am struck by the calm stillness of the air. I was expecting whipping winds and roadside flooding — too much Weather Channel I suppose. Prior to my departure, I had kept a close eye on the weather reports. Typhoon Mirinae slammed into Manila only days ago, toppling trees, damaging homes and taking lives. It was the fourth storm to batter the Philippines in less than 90 days.

MG shares that even though tropical storms are expected here, her parents, who live in a neighboring city, report that the quick succession of recent storms has taken its toll on residents.

Later in the week, we will visit communities in metro Manila and Quezon where ChildFund serves children and families. Some have been severely affected by the recent storms. I am looking forward to talking with the families and learning more about how they cope with the constant threat of severe weather and flooding.

On the ride to the hotel, MG teaches me to say hello and thank you, “maramirg Salamat,” in her native language. I love the musical lilt of the words, and I am relieved to arrive at the hotel at least able to greet and thank my hosts.

For more on ChildFund’s work in the Philippines, click here.

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