children

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The ‘Mama Effect’ on the World

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Have you heard the saying “When Mama ain’t happy, nobody’s happy”? The words are glib, but the sentiment behind them is right on target. A mother’s health and well-being have a huge impact on the future of her children and her community, both positively and negatively.

Consider a few statistics:

  • Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of an infant’s life, with continued breastfeeding up to the age of 2, would save about 800,000 children’s lives each year, according to the World Health Organization.
  • The children of more educated women also have a greater chance of surviving infancy and childhood. A 2010 study in The Lancet shows that for every additional year of school that girls receive on average after reaching childbearing age, there’s a corresponding 9.5 percent decrease in child mortality rates.
  • If women had the same access to seeds and farming tools as men do, agricultural output in 34 developing countries would rise by an average of 4 percent, which could mean up to 150 million fewer hungry people, according to U.N. Women.

This month, as we approach Mother’s Day, ChildFund is considering the “Mama Effect” — how mothers’ lives influence their children’s lives, both now and in the future. We are working in 30 countries worldwide to provide children and mothers with the tools they need to live healthy, independent and empowered lives. Find out how you can give a mother a helping hand. Your gesture can make a difference to a whole family, a community and even the world.

India mother and son

An Indian mother comforts her son.

Looking Back, Looking Forward

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

We’ve reached the final post of our 75th anniversary blog series: number 75. When this series started back in September 2013, I wasn’t sure this day would ever come, but it is here.

I’d like to take a moment to thank the ChildFund staff members who sat down for interviews, wrote stories, took photos, searched for archived photos and video, edited posts and made story suggestions. Your help was invaluable. Also, to all of the ChildFund Alliance leaders who contributed posts about their organizations’ work — thank you. It’s amazing that some of the countries where we worked decades ago are now strong and prosperous enough to help other children in need today.

During the series, we learned a great deal about the origins of ChildFund, which was called China’s Children Fund when it was founded in 1938 by Dr. J. Calvitt Clarke to help Chinese orphans. Over the years, our leaders and staff members — both in Richmond, Va. and abroad — have transformed our organization (renamed Christian Children’s Fund in 1951 and ChildFund in 2009) from a small but ambitious charity to a global aid organization that assisted more than 18 million people worldwide last year. 

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Children in Hong Kong, 1964.

Some of the most memorable posts for me were about children and alumni who have seen great change take hold in their lives.

Gleyson, a young man from Brazil, wrote about his neighborhood, which was plagued with violence stemming from the drug trade. It also didn’t have running water. But he was sponsored and enrolled in a ChildFund-supported project that provided him with tutoring, study materials, extracurricular dance and art classes, and above all, a supportive environment.

Today, he writes, “I graduated with a degree in business administration, and I am a professional, registered with the Regional and Federal Brazilian Administration Councils and specializing in financial management and controllership. I recently purchased a car, and I’m currently employed in a company in charge of the administrative management of condos.”

We heard many encouraging stories like Gleyson’s. Manisha’s family was able to quit the bangle-making trade in Firozabad, India, finding more lucrative and less hazardous work; Nicky, a Zambian man, earned a degree in business administration and went to work for a bank. Many of the Chinese orphans who grew up in Hong Kong orphanages started by CCF have found professional and personal success, and an amazing number have formed their own charities to help other children. My colleague, Christine Ennulat, wrote an essay about how we can’t count the number of people that have been helped through ChildFund — because our actions have a ripple effect.

ChildFund will continue our work as we enter our 76th year, focusing on children and their families and giving support to communities in need — while providing training and resources through our local partner organizations, a process that lets communities determine their destinies. On the world stage, we are pushing for greater recognition of children’s needs as the United Nations sets its post-2015 development goals.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll leave you with a message from our CEO and president, Anne Lynam Goddard:

“Because nothing lasts forever, I never take for granted that ChildFund will continue for another 75 years. The decisions we make today will impact the ChildFund of tomorrow. We must continue to evolve as an organization, meeting the needs of children in a rapidly changing and complex world.

“Maybe one thing does last forever — the warm-hearted generosity of people who help children living in poverty. That part of our shared humanity is truly enduring.”

Indonesia 75th celebration

THANK YOU!

What Does Water Mean to You?

Water means many different things to different people. Maybe you’re thinking that you need to drink more of it daily, or it’s time for a hot bath. Perhaps you are picturing a tea kettle on the stove? Do you think of lakes and rivers, glaciers and rainclouds?

Many of our readers have easy access to clean water. All it takes is turning on a faucet in the kitchen or bathroom. This sets us apart from many of the children and families ChildFund serves in 30 countries. Today is World Water Day, and we ask you to take a couple of minutes to watch this video showing how a lack of clean water affects every part of life, from infant mortality to education. Here are some ways you can help bring the gift of clean water to children and families in need.

 

 

A Wall That Connects Cultures

Pam's ChildFund mural

Pam Brown and the mural she painted at ChildFund’s international office in Richmond, Va.

By Karlo Goronja, ChildFund Communications Intern

Watoto figure

Communications staff member Dale Catlett crocheted an outfit for her Watoto.

Many ChildFund staff members have hidden talents, but everyone at our international office in Richmond, Va., knows about Pam Brown’s way with a paintbrush. An executive assistant in our information technology department, Pam painted an intricate — and large — world map mural unveiled in our employee lounge last month. It’s adorned with individually decorated Watotos, the child figure that replaces the “I” in the ChildFund logo.

A few months ago, communications director Cynthia Price came to Pam with the idea of using the Watoto — Swahili for child — in a wall decoration commemorating our organization’s 75th anniversary.

“The whole idea intrigued me, so of course I said yes,” Pam says. “We brainstormed a couple of times, and once we were on a roll, ideas just kept flowing out of us.”

As Pam did the detail work on tiny islands in the Pacific, as well painting the sprawling continents, other staff members decorated paper Watotos, taking inspiration from the 30 countries where ChildFund works.

Mozambique

Meg’s Mozambique Watoto

“For me, there’s special significance to the wall,” says Meg Carter, sponsorship communication specialist. “It reflects our love for the children, countries and cultures we serve. I lived in Guinea in 2010 and 2011, so I have many photos of children and daily life there. When we had the opportunity to participate in this project, I went through my photos to find the best ones. I wanted to show what it’s like for a child to live in Guinea.”

Meg’s Watoto displays the colors of the Guinean flag (red, yellow and green), the names of the country’s important holidays, and photos of children. She also created a Watoto for Mozambique using the same ideas.

“Many of the Watoto also reveal a deep understanding of the traditions and daily life in those places,” Meg says. “It says ‘We love you.’ It’s kind of like giving someone a Valentine that shows you know them deeply and want to be a part of their life.”

Although the wall has received much attention from staff and guests alike, perhaps the most important aspect to the artwork is its symbolism for our staff members, both in Richmond and abroad, and our many local partner organizations.

According to Pam, “I work for ChildFund, and I know the deep meaning of this mural firsthand and know how everyone feels about the welfare of the children this mural represents.”

 

A Memorable Conversation in Guatemala

Children in Guatemala

The best part of working at ChildFund, for many of our staff members, is to visit children at our programs, like this one in Guatemala.

We asked Lloyd McCormick, ChildFund’s director of youth programs, to tell us his favorite story from the field. He travels many weeks out of the year to our programs around the world.

75th ChildFund logoI was in Guatemala a few years ago assisting the Americas regional office, national office and the local partner organization in conducting a community consultation in a rural village in the mountains, a very beautiful place. It was held over two days, and during one of the first sessions, I started to interact with a boy about 10 or 11 years old. I don’t speak Spanish, so he was listening to me speak English to others around me that knew English. He was very intrigued by me speaking English, as were some other kids his age who were in the same session. After a bit, he started to address me in an imitation of what he thought English sounded like. It was actually just gibberish, but I immediately responded to him as if I understood exactly what he was saying. We then just got into a rhythm of a conversation with hand gestures, tones, and laughter — as if two old friends were having a great conversation.

Lloyd McCormick

Lloyd McCormick

The kids around him were flabbergasted that he seemed to know English and that we were having this conversation. The adults around us that knew English and Spanish just let us continue our “drama” and confirming that the other kids were so impressed their friend could speak English so fluently. After some time, we both just finally burst out in full laughter, and the gig was up. From that point on during the rest of the stay in the village, whenever this boy and I would run into each other, we would start our “English” conversation where we left off the last time, just enjoying a laugh and some simple fun. The whole thing continues to remind me how we can truly connect with children in different and simple ways.

Before the Year Ends, Consider Giving

Senegalese girls

5-year-old Racky and Fafa in Senegal. Photo by Christine Ennulat.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

This is the time of year when we often take stock of our past, present and future, and it’s a great opportunity to consider making a donation to help a child: a gift that truly has legs. Whether you begin sponsoring a child today or purchase a gift that will help a family or community, your gift will mean hope to a child in need.

Also, by giving before the end of the year, you can make a deduction on your tax forms for 2013. We encourage you to take a look at our planned giving options, which help make a difference to communities for years, allowing children to become independent, self-sustaining adults who have more opportunities than before. Thank you for your past, present and future generosity, and we wish you a happy and meaningful 2014!

Indian boys

Indian boys walk down a village road in Maharashtra. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Recognizing the Importance of Play in Children’s Lives

By Meg Carter, ChildFund Sponsorship Communication Specialist

Long before recorded history, children played. From the beginning, their play took three outward forms: conflict, imitation and chance. Play as conflict appears in games of skill and competitive sports. We associate imitation with cooperative games, such as role playing and creative or imaginative play. Games of chance — most familiar to us in cards and dice — often involve sticks, stones, shells, beads, or bones in developing countries.   

jumping rope

In Vietnam, a girl jumps rope.

We also know now that play is critical to children’s development, and many who live in developing countries do not have the time and opportunity to play with their peers, to lay down their worries for a moment and just be children.

Today is Universal Children’s Day, an event that aims for greater understanding of and among children of all nations. Its roots are in a 1954 United Nations conference when officials recommended that each country set aside a day for children. Nov. 20 has special meaning as the date on which the U.N. General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child in 1959 and, 30 years later, the Convention on the Rights of the Child. 

Educators describe play as the young child’s work. It’s more than self-expression. Unstructured play teaches children about the natural world, themselves and society. Through play, children develop motor and cognitive skills, learn cultural values and mature in emotional intelligence. Strategic thinking, pattern matching, problem solving, math mastery, negotiation, sensitivity to others and conflict resolution are just the beginning of play’s hidden benefits.

Kenya game

Children in Kenya play a jumping game.

If child’s play is the foundation of our intellectual, social, physical and emotional development, then play is education. And if education is human development, then development truly begins when each young child plays.

Last year, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon launched Global Education First (GEFI), a new initiative raising the political profile of education. Its premise is that education leads to gender equality, economic opportunity, health and environmental sustainability. GEFI aims to put every child in school, provide them all with quality education and, ultimately, transform children into global citizens.

ChildFund also seeks to improve educational opportunities and learning environments in every community where we work.

Having taught both here in the United States and in Africa, I know there’s more to education than schools, equipment, materials and instructors, essential as they are. The Declaration of the Rights of the Child reminds us: “The child shall have full opportunity for play and recreation.”

circle game

In Honduras, a circle game.

Play is universal; it comes naturally. Kids everywhere turn anything into a game. Think of hide-and-seek, kick-the-can, string games, Simon Says, clapping rhymes, rope skipping and hopscotch. You find them in Virginia, Eastern Europe, Southern Asia, Latin America and West Africa. In ChildFund International’s lobby, we have toys created by children in the countries we serve, playthings that demonstrate resourcefulness and creativity.

In developing countries, children play with scrap materials. A stick turns a wheel rim into a perpetual motion machine. Gathering up discarded plastic shopping bags, village boys weave them into soccer balls. Empty aluminum cans and bottle caps morph into toy animals or race cars. In a girl’s hands, a bit of cloth, some string and a corn husk become a doll.

Here in the United States, we’re blessed with leisure and money to spend on play dates, soccer lessons and computer games. But when play becomes our babysitter, we tend to forget its true value in children’s lives.

Kristina, a tutor at an Early Childhood Development center in Indonesia, often makes toys from available resources, including recycled materials, that teach her children about shapes and numbers. “With these resources, they get to play with a range of different educational toys, and we know that they are learning while enjoying being a child,” she says. ”I wish I had these when I was a child.”

A Big Day Out for Sri Lankan Children

By Himangi Jayasundera, ChildFund Sri Lanka

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrated the 75th anniversary of ChildFund International by taking 175 children to an amusement and water park. It was a day of fun rides and water slides for these children, who came from 11 districts where ChildFund works in Sri Lanka.

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrationThe celebrations commenced with a video screening of a message from ChildFund CEO and President Anne Goddard, followed by speeches from Eleanor Loudon, Sri Lanka’s national director, and short speeches by three participating children, who aired their opinions on education, child protection and what they would do if they were the leader of their country.

A highlight of the day was the launch of Listening to the Voices of Children, a report on the ideas and aspirations of children based on a survey of 1,000 children in 11 districts. The children who went to the amusement park were selected in a lottery from those who participated in the survey.

Other highlights included the cutting of the big 75th anniversary cake, distribution of gifts and a group photo.

“It has been a great day,” said Isuru, 12. “I especially liked the water slides, and we went on many rides. I didn’t expect it to be so much fun.”

ChildFund Sri Lanka celebrationChildFund Sri Lanka celebration

A Q&A with Victor Koyi, Regional Director of East and South Africa

By Sierra Winston, ChildFund Communications Intern

Victor Koyi, ChildFund’s new regional director of East and South Africa, has been with ChildFund for 17 years, most recently as national director of Kenya. He recently answered our questions about his motivations, successes and challenges.

75th ChildFund logoWhat is your favorite thing about working for ChildFund?
The opportunity to make a difference in the many deprived, excluded and vulnerable children around the globe that as an agency we have committed to serve is an honor beyond measure to me. So, getting to the field and seeing that in action is my favorite high point all the time.    

As ChildFund celebrates its 75th anniversary, could you tell us what you think has been the most important work we’ve done in East and South Africa?
In partnership with the respective governments and local partners in six countries in East and Southern Africa (Angola, Zambia, Mozambique, Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia), we have invested time and resources to ensure that children have access to education and training. 

Education and training have a significant positive impact on health, social and economic participation, equal opportunities and income and productivity. Education provides the core skills that children need in a competitive global economy and certainly for children who do not proceed to higher institutions of learning. Getting skills that help them to find a means of livelihood is a critical lifesaver.  

Victor Koyi

Victor Koyi (center), regional director of East and South Africa for ChildFund.

A variety of programs in East and Southern Africa, such as the Atlas project in Zambia, have helped public school teachers improve their technical capacities to teach children and increase use of active, participatory, child-friendly, research-based classroom practices, thus improving the quality, relevance and delivery of the curriculum. The Early Childhood Development investment in Kenya and Angola has given hope to young children in Emali and Elavoko; now they have equal access to effective care and development. 

The Investment in Safe Water provision in Ethiopia is enabling hundreds of households to have access to clean water, reducing waterborne diseases and allowing children to have more school time. It is not easy to isolate the most important work we have done. However, our partnership with communities, regional governments, donors and communities over the years has created a wonderful platform for children to thrive.            

How have conditions changed in the past couple of decades in terms of HIV and AIDS, particularly with children?
For nearly three decades, HIV and AIDS have devastated individuals and families with the tragedy of untimely death and medical, financial and social burdens. Although children’s concerns have always been present within the great spectrum of need associated with HIV, they have to some extent been overshadowed by the very scale of the epidemic in the adult populations. 

Thanks to the improved evidence and accelerated action by many development players, including ChildFund International, the story of how AIDS is affecting children is being rewritten.

Children are now central to strategies and actions to avert and address the consequences of the epidemic. It is true that infections still thrive, babies are being born with the virus and mothers are dying. Adolescents are still becoming infected, but advocacy and investment on behalf of children have had an impact, and the goal of virtual elimination of mother-to-child transmission by 2015 appears within reach.

Through its East and Southern Africa country programs and in partnership with communities and other stakeholders, ChildFund has built community capacity to address psychosocial needs of children affected by HIV, helped reduce mother-to-child transmission, and contributed to a generation of informed youths who work to eliminate biases against HIV-positive people and are aware of the dangers of risky behavior. 

The combined treatment efforts and increased knowledge have significantly reduced infection rates in the region. 

What motivates you in your life?
I am fortunate to have had people in my life who helped me to navigate my way through life with some level-headedness. My parents and guardians helped to shape the value system that has influenced the person I am today. My greatest motivation is to pass on to my family, friends and peers values that contribute to making our communities a better place to live in. One of the most serious indictments against our civilization is our flagrant disregard for the welfare of our children and weaker minorities. Any effort I can make to change that — even if it is one person at a time — is my motivation in everything I do.

75 Years and Counting

Enjoy and share this new video produced for ChildFund International’s 75th anniversary, featuring the faces of children, families and staff members over the years. Our sponsors and other supporters make all this possible. Thank you.

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The Mama Effect

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