famine

What If You Couldn’t Feed Your Family?

by Virginia Sowers, ChildFund Community Manager

My small backyard garden hasn’t had much attention lately. It’s been oppressively hot this summer in Richmond, and we’ve had little rain in the past month. Suffice to say that I gave in to the elements and got a bit slack about nurturing my plants.

Veggies from the gardenBut this morning, following a refreshing overnight rain, I ventured out to the weed patch — er, garden — and poked around. I was disappointed to find my largest, yet not-quite-ripe, cantaloupe pocked with two bird beak-sized holes and its stem knocked off. The crowder peas, which yielded one family-size mess about a month ago, have now dried on the vine. The arugula has bolted and bloomed — nothing tasty there. I did manage to rescue a green pepper and a dozen small figs.

I had already started my mental list for the grocery store when it hit me hard. The children and families that ChildFund is rushing aid to in the Horn of Africa don’t have that option — not even close. They would be thrilled to have a damaged melon, a crisp pepper and a handful of figs. But what would they eat tomorrow?

And what would I do if I was depending on my meager garden to carry my family through three more months until the next harvest in November? I’d certainly be pulling out my weeding hoe and my garden hose. But wait — what if I’d already sold my tools to raise cash for food, and what if my community well had long since gone dry?

What would I do then?

It’s a grim thought, one that those of us in developed nations tend to quickly brush aside. Even with the ongoing economic uncertainty, the vast majority of us have plenty to eat and drink.

This afternoon, as I drive to the grocery store, I’ll be thinking more about necessities than luxuries. I should be able to save enough to make a donation to ChildFund’s ChildAlert Emergency Fund. I know the East African children who are hungry and thirsty are counting on my support.

Please join me.

A Close-up Look at the East Africa Drought

Based in Ethiopia, Isam Ghanim, ChildFund’s executive vice president for Global Programs, answers questions about the cause and impact of the drought in East Africa. Read the full interview with Isam on ChildFund’s website.

Photo of Isam Ghanim

Isam Ghanim, ChildFund's executive vice president for Global Programs

What has led to this food crisis?
It’s a situation that we refer to as a slow-onset emergency. This was caused by two consecutive rainy seasons failing, and the short rainy seasons in Kenya and Ethiopia also failed. This has led to an increase in food prices. There is also high inflation in all of these countries. And there is violence in Somalia. A significant number of Somalians have moved to established camps in Ethiopia and Kenya.

Families entered this crisis with depleted assets and very poor physical conditions. For almost two years now, they have been affected by food shortages. They are suffering from nutritional stress. There is only so long you can cope before you fall into acute malnutrition. The environmental conditions and the health conditions take their toll.

What is the current situation?
More than 11.5 million people are affected. In the areas where ChildFund works, we estimate 660,000 people are affected, with 7,000 children facing life-threatening conditions. This is a very serious situation. Stress indicators are reaching the levels that you see in the middle of a famine. Without immediate intervention, children will die.

What impacts of the drought are we seeing?
Children and their parents are malnourished and at increased risk of disease due to poor hygiene because of the shortage of water. They are suffering from physical and emotional stress. People are moving from their homes.

The most grievously affected are women and children. They have less capability to move. For young children, there is a permanent impact on their health — stunting, wasting, mental development. If the mother is breastfeeding, she won’t have enough milk. When parents are under significant stress, the normal care and support for children will be minimized.

What is ChildFund doing to help?
ChildFund is addressing the immediate life-threatening conditions affecting children — providing food, water and basic health services, as well as supplemental feeding through early childhood care and development centers to ensure babies and young children will not fall into acute malnutrition.

In addition, ChildFund is working to help families stay in their own communities so that when the rains come in September they are there to plant crops and cultivate their farms. If they don’t plant, they will lose another harvest and experience another year without food.

There is also a need to address child protection issues. Parents are too weak to care for their children. They have no roof over their head. Providing support is critical so that families don’t deplete their resources as part of their coping mechanism.

Read the complete interview and learn more about ChildFund’s response in the Horn of Africa.

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