Goats

Goats Contribute to a Brighter Future

Fernanda and her goat

Fernanda and her family’s goat.

By Silvia Ximenes, ChildFund Timor-Leste

Nine-year-old Fernanda’s family tends a garden in Manatuto, Timor-Leste, with corn, long beans, bananas and cassava that feed Fernanda and her four siblings, with enough left over to sell and make a small income. Now, they have a goat too, which they received earlier this year.

“We don’t have a rice field, as most people do, but only a small plot of land for vegetables,” says Fernando, Fernanda’s father. “We only do farming in which the production is very low and not enough to sustain family needs. We really wanted to do some other things in order to support family’s income, like buy goats, but we have no money. So we are lucky and happy to receive the goat.”

Fernando’s family is one of 10 families who received a goat this past spring. Fernanda and her siblings enjoy taking care of the 10 goats, which are kept in the same field. “After school I pull out the goats, feed and give them drink and let them eat the grass,” says Fernanda, who wants to become a teacher.

“Once our goat has multiplied, then I will sell some to buy my children’s school materials — such as books, pens, uniforms, et cetera,” says Fernando.  “Moreover, we will also have some for family consumption.”

It is quite rare for families in Manatuto to include meat in their meals, as it is too expensive and in limited supply. “We can only eat goat’s meat when there is a cultural event or ceremony, which probably happens about two to five times a year,” Fernando says.

“With respect and happiness, I want to thank the donors who provide us goats,” he adds. “We will take care of them.”

Fernando hopes his children will have a promising future. “I want them to have a good education and later to have a job, so they can have a better life. I will keep supporting them with my own efforts to help them realize their dreams.”

The Impact of Goats in Guinea

DialloReporting by Arthur Tokpah, ChildFund Guinea

ChildFund Guinea’s staff met with Mamadou Aly Diallo, coordinator of the Denkadi Federation of Dabola, a local partner organization that has provided support with distribution of goats, sheep and other items to 135 families living in need in Guinea. The goats were purchased by ChildFund supporters in the Gifts of Love & Hope catalog. Here is an interview with Diallo (pictured at left):

Please tell us about this project.

Diallo: We participated in a project that allowed us to support 700 children with school supplies and 135 families with goats and sheep for breeding; fertilizers, seeds and insecticides for gardening, and we also provide household latrines.

 

Goats in Guinea

Guinean families with their new goats.

What benefit will the goats and sheep give these families?

Diallo: Families that receive goats have the potential to improve their lives. We thought it was beneficial to focus on this potential by providing them with the necessary skills, knowledge and animals that will permit them to take charge of their future.

In our communities, the populations are basically local farmers. Those who have the means purchase cattle that they use to cultivate land on a large scale, yield more products and generate more income. But poorer families cannot afford to rent or buy cattle.

However, there is a barter system that exists in these communities, giving people the opportunity to exchange goats or sheep for cattle; at least four sheep or goats equal one cow. Nevertheless, the idea behind providing goats and sheep to families is not limited to obtaining cattle. In a short time period, they can cultivate a herd of goats or sheep, which are easier to sell in local markets for quick income, allowing them to gain confidence and recognition in their villages. That’s why we thought that goats and sheep could be a solution for the short or long term.

 

goats getting immunized

Goats get immunized to keep them healthy.

How did the project work? 

In 2013, we identified 135 extremely poor families who use traditional tools and bare hands to do their farming work, have only two small meals a day and whose children are not enrolled in school but rather work on their farms. Initially we provided a total of 200 animals (140 sheep and 60 goats) to 100 families (one pair per family). Later in September, the remaining 35 families received 140 sheep for breeding (two pairs per family).

Before delivering the animals to the families, the Federation signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Animal Husbandry. They immunized these animals and administered de-wormers.

 

What is the current state of the first 200 animals given to families?

Diallo: According to the Department of Animal Husbandry, 75 percent of the animals have reproduced. We are told that the children of these families play happily with the young animals, cherish them and also learn to care for them. We are hopeful that in a few years’ time, these families will be financially independent enough to plow their land, pay school tuition for their children and meet their basic needs.

Give a Gift That Grows

chicken with eggs

Ten-year-old Bisafikade of Ethiopia and his chicken. Photo by Jake Lyell.

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Hooray, it’s spring! (For many of us on the East Coast and in the Midwest, it’s been a long time coming.) Let’s celebrate by giving gifts that grow, like chickens, goats and fruit trees.

Families in countries where ChildFund works have requested these as specific needs, among others. Livestock and plant seeds are gifts in more than one way, because they produce food that families can eat and sell. A pair of dairy goats provides milk, cheese and yogurt; fruit trees produce nutritious fruit and seeds that can grow into more trees. And chickens lay eggs, which frees up family income for other needs like education and health care.

These gifts often make a difference in a child’s ability to attend school or have proper clothing and shoes, because families can make income from selling surplus fruit, dairy products or eggs. Please consider giving a gift from our online catalog or by calling us at 1-800-610-9013. Thanks, and let’s enjoy the season.

 

Hope in the Form of a Goat

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

Read Nicole’s first post about her trip to Dominica, a Caribbean island nation where ChildFund works.

I often say that ChildFund’s work begins where the pavement ends, and this rang true in Dominica. Within a few blocks of a docked cruise ship, about 10 miles outside of the capital of Roseau, we parked the car and walked up a path of crumbling stones and packed earth.

Miranda and Lashana

Miranda and her 4-year-old daughter Lashana.

It was there that I met Miranda, 31, and her 4-year-old daughter, Lashana. Miranda and her five children, who are enrolled in ChildFund’s programs, live in a small two-bedroom home she inherited from her grandmother. The home is made of weathered wood panels atop cement blocks. There are gaps where the ceiling and walls don’t meet, and broken windows outnumber whole ones.

They have lived without electricity for more than five years, and their bathroom is in the backyard, with a pit latrine and a hose for a shower, plus a few panels of plywood and rusted metal sheets for privacy. Her three sons, aged 17, 14 and 12, share one tiny bedroom; her two daughters, aged 9 and 4, sleep in a twin bed in the hall outside of the bedroom that Miranda shares with Lashana’s father.

Miranda does her best for the family. She encourages her children to go to school so they will have more opportunities than she had. The school down the road is supported by ChildFund and embraces the child-friendly methodology (including alternative discipline, age-appropriate furniture, bright and engaging learning environments and parental engagement). We had visited the school earlier in the day to distribute sleeping cots for preschoolers and to see a renovated library where children can read, study and imagine.

Lashana suffers from asthma and other respiratory problems, which often forces her to return home early from preschool; she often falls ill if any of her classmates are sick. Miranda believes in the power of early stimulation and education, something ChildFund encourages throughout Dominica and in other countries, so she has educational charts at home to promote Lashana’s learning of the alphabet, numbers, vegetables and fruits.

Lashana and goat

Lashana and her goat.

Miranda doesn’t have a formal education, so her employment options are limited.

She takes on odd jobs, anything to provide for her family — cleaning homes, washing laundry by hand and so on. Miranda also keeps a small garden in the backyard to feed her family and sell the surplus produce in the market. But heavy rains this year ruined her crops and waterlogged the seeds. As a result, the family is having a hard time making ends meet.   This is why Lashana was all smiles as she told me her most exciting news: She recently received a goat from her ChildFund sponsor. Though Lashana knows it is her goat, she also realizes that this goat will help the entire family with milk to sell, and once they breed the goat, they will be able to supplement their income by selling the offspring.

The day-to-day life for this family is daunting, but they have hope. Sponsors help provide hope for many children through their support of ChildFund’s programs and the families themselves. Sometimes in the form of a goat.

The Early Bird Gets…the Goat

By Loren Pritchett, ChildFund Writer

Attention early holiday shoppers! (And if that’s not you, we totally understand). But if you are the type who likes to get a jump on things, we wanted to let you in on the news: The 2012 edition of ChildFund’s Gifts of Love & Hope catalog is now online and in the mail.

You’ll find hundreds of meaningful gifts in this year’s catalog including clean water, warm clothing, school supplies, medical needs and a barnyard of farm animals.

Child w/Goat

A child holds a goat she received from ChildFund’s Gifts of Love & Hope catalog.

They’re not usually gift wrapped and you can’t find them at just any store, but goats are one of the most requested items in many of the countries where ChildFund works. Providing nutritious milk, fertilizer and a source of family income, goats are a valuable asset to families and communities. ChildFund’s Gifts of Love & Hope catalog makes it possible to send this essential gift and many more to families in need. As an early shopper you will have peace of mind knowing that your shopping is done and your timely gifts are answering a family’s most urgent needs.

Honor your loved ones with a gift ordered before Dec. 15, and they will receive a personalized card announcing your generosity. For gift catalog orders of $100 or more, placed by Dec. 31, ChildFund will deliver a free mosquito net in your honor. Take advantage of these specials, order early!

Once you order – we take care of the rest! Each item in the catalog has been specifically requested by children and families who live in ChildFund program areas. ChildFund staff in each country will purchase and then deliver your gift. You can rest assured that each item is delivered and used as described in the catalog. In many cases of farm animal purchases, ChildFund will even provide gift recipients with additional training in animal husbandry to maximize the value of your donation.

For children in our programs, these gifts are an opportunity for a brighter, healthier future. We invite you to preview the catalog and purchase a gift of love and hope that will help change a child’s life.

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