guide mothers

Thanks, Mom!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by ChildFund staff members and photographer Jake Lyell

Mothers are crucial to ChildFund’s mission, whether they’re guide mothers in the Americas spreading reliable health and nutrition information, three Indonesian mothers growing vegetables for their families, or a group of Ugandan moms who are contributing to a village savings and loan program. Or the numerous grandmothers raising their grandchildren in Mozambique after they lost their parents to AIDS. This Sunday is Mother’s Day in the United States, a time when many of us celebrate our mothers and mother-figures in our lives — women who are there to listen or laugh with us, or sometimes tell us hard truths. Above are some pictures of moms from around the world who are connected with ChildFund’s programs. We have more in common with them than you may believe possible.

Join us on our Facebook page today to share your photos and thoughts about your mother or other important women in your life. We’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

Rita of Guatemala: A Student and a Teacher

Guatemala guide mother

Rita is a guide mother in Guatemala’s highlands, and she is learning to lead early childhood education programs in her community.

By Nicole Duciaume, Americas Region Sponsorship Manager

Rita’s first day as a volunteer is filled with bursting nerves, excitement, confidence and fear. At one point, she candidly admits that she wants to do a good job so that those who trained her would be proud of what she learned and how she is applying it.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

Guide mother Rita with her children, 4-year-old Sebastian and 1-year-old Jocelyn.

She joined ChildFund recently as a guide mother in the highlands of Guatemala. Over the next several years, she will take weekly classes on diverse topics such as parenting skills, children’s learning styles, nutrition, child rights, the importance of play and many more. She will then lead weekly community-based early childhood education sessions and will be a go-to resource for other mothers in her community.

Now 21 years old, Rita got married at age 17. She explains that her father died when she was in the fourth grade, forcing her to drop out of school to work on a small farm along with her mother and six siblings. This was the only way for the family to survive. She talks about the hardships of being a mother in a part of the world where women have little opportunity for education or work.

When asked why she wanted to be a guide mother, she lights up. Her answer is simple: “A better future for my children, so that they have chances that I never had. I want them to get an education and get whatever job they want.” She goes on to explain how important it is for her to learn and be a good model for her children, saying, “I didn’t get a chance to study, so this is also my turn to learn.”

With her 1-year-old daughter, Jocelyn, wrapped to her back with a perraje, a woven shawl, Rita stands in front of 15 eager children ready to play and learn. One of them is her 4-year-old son, Sebastian. Rita leads the class of 3- to 5-year-olds through various singing and coloring exercises, which translates into language acquisition and fine motor skills development. A smile of relief spreads across Rita’s face as the class ends and she knows that this session, the first of many more to come, has been a huge success.

Through ChildFund’s guide mother program, Rita is both the student and the teacher.

‘When I Met Irene, I Knew …’

Reporting by ChildFund Bolivia

Snapshot of a struggling family in Bolivia: The father works on faraway farms and returns home only occasionally. The mother sells vegetables in the local market during the morning and part of the afternoon, leaving her children in the care of the eldest, who is 10. The youngest, Irene, is 5 months.

In 2006, the government of Bolivia instituted a new program, called Zero Malnutrition, with the goal of eradicating malnutrition in children under age 5. Knowing of ChildFund’s vast experience in child development, the Bolivian Ministry of Health and Sports invited ChildFund to implement a child development component through Zero Malnutrition in rural Oruro, the region where Irene’s family lives.

ChildFund’s contribution was to train “guide mothers,” volunteers who monitor and support the development of the children in their communities. ChildFund taught the guide mothers how to use our child development scale to screen children and identify specific developmental needs. They also received training in ways to work with parents to help them support their children’s development.

Maria was one of those guide mothers. She visited Irene.

Four children standing

Irene and some of her siblings.

“When I met Irene, I understood my mission,” she says.

On that first evaluation, Maria found that Irene had diarrhea, an acute respiratory infection, acute malnutrition, anemia and visible signs of emaciation, and that she was under both height and weight for her age.

Trained to recognize danger signs, Maria reported the case to the local health center, and staff from there soon performed a field visit. They provided Irene’s mother with medicine as well as an orientation on how to treat Irene.

Maria also evaluated Irene’s development and found she was not progressing in all areas as she should.

Toddler seatedWithin a year, after continued visits from Maria and with appropriate care, Irene was a healthy 18-month-old. She was still small for her age, but her weight was appropriate for her size. She also had caught up with her peers in three of five developmental areas.

Maria says the work is hard, but when she sees families in her community who have so little, she’s inspired to give her best efforts to teaching them what she’s learned about how to keep children on track and healthy.

ChildFund Honduras Guide Mothers Program Recognized for Innovation

by Lylli Moya, ChildFund Honduras Communications Officer

ChildFund Honduras has achieved an honorable mention as Best Innovation for its Guide Mother’s program. The award, presented jointly by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the ALAS Foundation (led by the Colombian singer Shakira) recognizes innovations and excellence in early childhood development programs in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Two mothers and a childChildFund’s Guide Mother’s program was cited for its commitment to children and for engaging families and communities with active participation in children’s development.

The success of the program stems from the voluntary work done by local mothers who assist neighboring families in the communities served by ChildFund Honduras programs. Trained by ChildFund Honduras, the guide mothers pay monthly home visits to provide guidance on children’s development, including communication and language, motor skills, cognitive and socio-emotional development appropriate for the child’s age group.

child playing with blocksThanks to the efforts of 2,095 guide mothers in Honduras, more than 8,600 children under the age of six have benefited.

More than 700 individuals and institutions throughout the Latin America and the Caribbean region submitted nominations for the ALAS-IDB award in the categories of Best Teacher, Best Publication, Best Innovation and Best Center. The ALAS-IDB awards are first of their type in the region and honor professionals and organizations that have made outstanding contributions to early childhood development.

Learn more about ChildFund’s work in Honduras and sponsoring a child.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,058 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter