HIV/AIDS

Another Lease on Life, Hope Restored (part 2)

by Naomi Njoki Nyaga as told to ChildFund Kenya

To commemorate World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, Naomi, who lives in the Kiambu District of Kenya’s Central Province, agreed to share her story. Today, we continue with part two of Naomi’s story of living with HIV/AIDS. This year’s theme for World AIDS Day is Universal Access and Human Rights.

With time, I made up my mind not to sit and wait for people to come and sympathize with me, but rather find a way to earn a living. Besides working hard on my farm, I started cooking food and hawking it at construction sites and market places. Since then, my children have not lacked life’s basic essentials. I recently bought a dairy cow, which supplies us

A dairy cow provides milk and also a bit of extra income for Naomi’s family.

with milk for use at home and the little surplus is sold.

Having gone through tough times, I resolved to go out in the community and help many people with the same challenges learn how to cope with their conditions. I want to see them come out of denial and self-hate and be the best they can be. That has become the mission of my life.

When I expressed this desire to Kihara Widows CBO officials, they were excited about it. They asked me to join them as a member of Kihara Widows CBO, where I would be better placed to reach more others. Through ChildFund WSN (Weaving the Safety Net) program, I received training as a Community-Based Worker. I identified five clients who were completely bedridden and in dire need of support in form of home-based care.

Braved Ridicule and Objection
One case I will never forget is of a lady who had literally been abandoned by her family and left to die. Her children had been clandestinely taken to live with a relative who lived a long distance from her home. Her relatives went every morning and evening to check whether she had died. Before that could happen, I got wind of it, and swiftly went to rescue her. I braved ridicule and objection from her relatives. I was not about to see another soul die when I could help. When she regained her health, I helped reunite her with her children. She is now a very successful business woman and a Community Based Worker just like me.

I have joined hands with many other like-minded groups who have a passion and commitment to not only helping people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) but also assisting the community to accept rather than stigmatize and discriminate people in such conditions. I strive to sensitize the community to provide a favorable environment for those infected or affected by HIV/AIDS so as to enable us live life to its fullness without putting barriers to our ambitions.

Accepting My Condition and Choosing to Live Positively
I have received further training in Community Health Work through the Ministry of Health. I also represent Kihara Widows in the Constituency AIDS Control Committee (CACC) in the location, and work very closely with Kihara Health Center as a patient trainer, having received training for the same through the International Center for Aids Care and Treatment Program (ICAP). I am often called upon to give motivational talks at churches, chiefs’ barazas [meeting places], schools and other social gatherings. Accepting my condition and choosing to live positively have not only enabled me regain my self worth, but I’m also able to instill the same to others with confidence.

Now I realize I have a purpose to live. My family is happy. We are progressing well in life. My firstborn son who is 19 is currently sitting for his final examination in high school. The sister who follows him is 15 and in form two. My 10-year-old son is in standard three, while the last born girl is 5 years attending nursery school [Early Childhood Development Center]. I have disclosed to my three older children and made them know that, their youngest sister and I are HIV positive. They have accepted our status and are very keen to ensure we adhere to our daily medication.

Naomi with three of her four children, who are now doing well in school.

I do not see my life as being abnormal in any way nor do I allow myself to be affected by what insensitive people say about me or my children. I urge everyone to know their HIV status. Testing positive to HIV/AIDS does not translate to death. I am a living proof — it is possible to come out of self-stigma, overcome stigma from without and live a full life.

Why?

Healing begins from within.

Tomorrow: The story of a HIV/AIDS home-based care volunteer in Uganda.

Another Lease on Life, Hope Restored

by Naomi Njoki Nyaga as told to ChildFund Kenya

On the occasion of World AIDS Day, Naomi, who lives in the Kiambu District of Kenya’s Central Province, agreed to share her story. The 37-year-old widowed mother of four children, Naomi and her youngest child are HIV-positive. She and her children are enrolled in the ChildFund Weaving the Safety Net program for orphans and other vulnerable children, which has delivered medical care and support to the family. This year’s theme for World AIDS Day is Universal Access and Human Rights. Today and tomorrow, Naomi shares her story.

Having lost my husband to HIV/AIDS in the year 2005, I knew it was just a matter of time before the same fate befell me, as I had also been diagnosed and tested HIV-positive.

I lost hope of living the day my husband was buried.

Back then, HIV/AIDS was considered a death sentence in my village. I had attended countless burials and had no doubt in my mind my day was imminent.

Depressed and Ill
My health started deteriorating very fast. I sunk into a serious depression. The whole situation would have been bearable with support from those around me, specifically my relatives, but it wasn’t so. They avoided us like a plague. I would spend days without anyone visiting me, despite them knowing how much I needed their support. Some even avoided a simple handshake. I felt such a social misfit. I begun to hate myself, and bitterness was slowly consuming me.

A Ray of Hope
When I thought all was lost, I encountered a local community-based organization (CBO) —Kihara Widows, a ChildFund partner in the Weaving the Safety Net for Orphans and other Vulnerable Children (WSN/OVC) program which understood my circumstances. In 2006, my children were enrolled in the program, which made me feel some weight had been lifted off my shoulders. My firstborn son, who had lost hope of going to high school, was enabled to do so. My other three children also became beneficiaries of the various interventions in WSN program.

Naomi and her youngest child are HIV-positive but living positively.

The kind visitors from Kihara Widows CBO, who were now becoming good friends, noticed that my condition was worsening. Having been trained in home-based care they started coming to my home more frequently. Their encouragement, home-based care services and commitment made me come out of the sorry state I was in. My perception to life was different. There was a ray of hope, not just for my children but also for me. A determination to conquer started building up within me. Soon I wanted to live more than ever before, as it dawned on me that I have a right to life. Through their encouragement, I sought treatment for the opportunistic infections that had become frequent, I guess aggravated by stress, fear and anger. Soon I was put on anti-retroviral therapy.

Tomorrow: Read how Naomi is now supporting her family and helping others who face the same challenges that she has.

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