International Youth Day

Zoila: A Peer Influencer for Good in Guatemala

 By Diana Benitez, ChildFund Guatemala

 The United Nations declared Aug. 12 as International Youth Day in 1999, so ChildFund is taking this week to focus on challenges that especially affect teens and young adults, as well as celebrate young people who are showing strong leadership in the countries we serve. Today we meet Zoila, a youth who shared her story with Diana on our Communications team in Guatemala.

Zoila at home

Zoila does her chores at home in Guatemala.

“Hi, my name is Zoila. I am in the first grade of secondary school, and I’m 15. I am participating in the ChildFund Guatemala project ‘I Love Myself, I Take Care of Myself.’

“It is very important for me to learn about the risks we face as adolescents when we start having relationships, as sometimes we don’t really realize the consequences of what we do.

“Since I started participating in the project, I see a big difference. I like to help young people, especially other girls like me. At the beginning, they didn’t listen to me, but now they are more interested in these topics.

“I advise my sisters and brothers that we have to think to our future. We can do many good things, but sometimes we think of marriage as a first option, but it is not the most important because we are still very young. I am not saying that I will never get married, but it will come at the right time.”

Zoila doing homework

Zoila does her homework.

Zoila is a young girl with a positive attitude, and she’s confident that she will have a bright future. In her community, she plays a very important role, by sharing her knowledge with her peers and also with her family. Community members say that Zoila is a good example.

The “I Love Myself, I Take Care of Myself” project, supported by ChildFund Guatemala, teaches adolescents to be empowered and able to make good decisions about relationships, marriage and parenthood.

An Ethiopian Girl Gets Closer to Her Dream

The United Nations declared Aug. 12 as International Youth Day in 1999, so ChildFund is taking this week to focus on challenges that especially affect teens and young adults, as well as celebrate young people who are showing strong leadership in the countries we serve.

Reporting by ChildFund Ethiopia

Mekdes, an 18-year-old girl from Ethiopia, received a one-year scholarship in March 2012 through ChildFund and our Twitter followers to mark International Women’s Day. We checked back with her in July 2013 to see how she was doing. 

“I trained in hair dressing for six months and graduated in September 2012,” Mekdes reports. “I started working in one hair salon in our village four months ago, earning a monthly salary of 600 birr [approximately US$32] that enabled me to fulfill our basic needs and cover the medical cost for my grandmom, who has asthma. I have also bought a cell phone for myself and also started to fulfill my needs, such as clothing and shoes.”

Mekdes of Ethiopia

Mekdes has graduated from a cosmetology program and is now working toward having her own business.

Mekdes was chosen as a scholarship recipient for a Twitter campaign ChildFund launched in honor of International Women’s Day. She had encountered many hardships, having lost her father at a young age; her mother couldn’t take care of Mekdes on her own. She also had to drop out of secondary school despite having good grades after her grandmother lost her job. When we met her last year, Mekdes had to work as a hairdresser and a day laborer, but today she has the hope of one day owning her own business.

She has passionate feelings about International Women’s Day because it demonstrates that all women have the potential to be productive and involved in community development. Mekdes also explained that since women are vulnerable in many ways and are sometimes affected more by poverty, the need for supporting them in their pursuits is important.

“In the future, I have a plan to get further training in a boys’ beauty salon, and I have a plan to open my own beauty salon,” Mekdes says. “After fulfilling the income need, which is a priority for us to survive, I will continue my education. I would like to thank ChildFund for helping me to be successful in my life.”

A Mexican Youth: ‘ChildFund Is My Family’

By Gabriela Ramirez Hernandez, ChildFund Mexico

The United Nations declared Aug. 12 as International Youth Day in 1999, so ChildFund is taking this week to focus on challenges that especially affect teens and young adults, as well as celebrate young people who are showing strong leadership in the countries we serve.

Chucho started life with many challenges, growing up in an impoverished community in Michoacan, Mexico. His father died when he was only 2, and his mother passed away from cancer when he was 11. Fortunately, his aunt took him in and he also became more engaged with ChildFund programs. 

Today, Chucho, whose given name is Jesús, is 21 years old. He is a dance instructor, gives workshops on environmental education, studies marketing at college and volunteers for environmental causes.

Chucho began his affiliation with ChildFund México at the age of 6. He started by being involved in skills development programs, and as he grew older, he participated in sporting events, celebrations, reading programs and after-school tutoring.

As time passed, Chucho realized that he was changing on the inside. He was less introverted, he was able to speak in public without embarrassment, and he felt more confident.

Mexican youth

Chucho is a leader in his community, teaching dance lessons and working to improve the environment.

After completing elementary school, he began practicing oratory, participating in competitions and winning first place several times. “What I wanted the most was to show my family that every effort has good results,” he says. Chucho also discovered his passion: dancing.  

But life was still complicated, because he had no money to continue studying. At the age of 14 he decided to enter the National Council for Educational Development (CONAFE) and started working as a teacher’s aide in his community.

“I worked very hard in order to convince the children to participate in various competitions, to organize contests with other schools, and they always won something,” Chucho says. “I wanted to share with them one of the most important things I had learned in ChildFund Mexico: that everything is possible if you work hard for it.”

At the age of 15, Chucho received recognition from the council as the top teachers’ aide. His ChildFund sponsor, who still supports him today, expressed her pride in him too.

Then one day, Chucho received a proposal to become the youth leader of the local partner organization, Valle Verde, which works with ChildFund México. He accepted without hesitation and began to organize all kinds of events, recognizing that young people need support and motivation.  

As he entered high school, Chucho chose to do community service for an organization called Biocinosis, which focuses on environmental education. Another organization, Reforestemos Mexico, invited Chucho to join in reforestation and recycling programs, further building his knowledge.

In 2012, Chucho received the Youth Merit Award of Michoacán. This is an award given to young people who are great leaders in different fields. He received the award from the governor of Michoacán, and Chucho was on the radio and television news. 

Clearly, Chucho has the potential to achieve many more goals as an adult.

“All the things I have done and what I am today is thanks to ChildFund Mexico,” he says. “They taught me so many things, and they took care of me when my parents died. They are my family. Now I want to continue working with young people so we can improve our community together.”

In Ecuador, ‘Hummingbirds’ Take Flight

The United Nations declared Aug. 12 as International Youth Day in 1999, so ChildFund is taking this week to focus on challenges that especially affect teens and young adults, as well as celebrate young people who are showing strong leadership in the countries we serve.

Ecuador’s youth face many challenges, including early parenthood, violence and substance abuse. ChildFund is working closely with teens in the Quito area to provide a supportive environment for candid discussions and to help youth set goals and develop leadership skills. In turn, these young people are taking action in their communities by interacting with their peers and dispensing good advice. Learn more about the youth-led Hummingbird Squads in this video produced by ChildFund Ecuador.

Carving Out a Future: Youth Apprentices in Timor-Leste

By Belchior Goncalves and Zoe Hogan, ChildFund Timor-Leste

In many ways, Timor-Leste is a young country – just 10 years since the restoration of its independence, more than 60 percent of the population is under age 25 (2010 Census). As more young people leave school and look for work each year, the majority find that employment opportunities are few and far between. In the rural district of Bobonaro, about 56 percent of the people do not have formal employment (2010 Census). Many young people work on their family’s subsistence farms or admit that they “do nothing.”

trainer in carpentry shop

Yohanes, 59, is training five Timorese youth in carpentry skills, so they can open their own small businesses and build sustainable livelihoods.

With the support of ChildFund Timor-Leste, one man is taking action on what he sees as an opportunity, rather than a problem. “There are many youth I see who could grow, develop and support themselves,” says Yohanes, a 59-year-old carpenter. An experienced trainer, Yohanes has partnered with ChildFund Timor-Leste’s community-based organization in Bobonaro to provide young people with the opportunity of a lifetime – a chance to learn a trade and start their own business.

Young men using carpentry tools

Yohanes oversees the apprentices’ work.

ChildFund Timor-Leste identified five unemployed young people in Bobonaro district who had limited education but displayed the determination to work for a brighter future. Yohanes is working alongside these five apprentices, showing them how to make quality chairs, desks, doors and windows. For five days a week, the center is a hive of activity as Yohanes and his apprentices try to keep up with local demand for their well-made products. After the apprentices complete the 12-month program, ChildFund Timor-Leste provides each one with carpentry tools so they can use their newfound skills to start a small business.

Apprentice in carpentry center

After 12 months of practical training, Natalino will receive carpentry tools to start his own business.

Natalino, a promising apprentice, was forced to leave primary school after just one year because his parents could no longer support him. “There are lots of youth in the village, but they don’t go to school. They will end up the same as I was before, just farming,” Natalino says.

Natalino is in no doubt of how important the support of ChildFund Timor-Leste and Yohanes is to his future: “If I stay here for one year, I will leave as a carpenter. It will change my life.”

Watch a video of the apprentices at work.

Youth Lead the Way

Reporting by ChildFund Bolivia and ChildFund Honduras

On International Youth Day, ChildFund salutes the young people in our programs worldwide who are embracing education, developing their skills and working every day to make their communities better places to live.
In Asia, Africa and the Americas, youth are taking on leadership roles, constantly inspiring us with their insights and enthusiasm.

Today we introduce you to a few of those youth in Honduras and Bolivia. Teenagers like Kevin, Wendy and Jordi who are helping ChildFund Honduras’s local partner, ADACOL, develop a strategic plan to improve conditions in their area. They are developing their public speaking skills and contributing to important community decisions.

In Bolivia, the Obispo Anaya Youth Club recently greeted ChildFund CEO Anne Lynam Goddard, eagerly sharing their achievements in ChildFund’s youth leader program. Through this program, the youth are engaged in news reporting, growing community gardens and protecting the environment in and around the city of Cochabamba.

With children and youth as our partners, we know the world will become a better place.

Partnering With Youth

By Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

In the spirit of this year’s International Youth Day theme, Building a Better World: Partnering with Youth, ChildFund Kenya invited its team of interns to share their thoughts on working with ChildFund this summer. The Kenya office provided various hands-on learning opportunities to help prepare these young people for future employment. Here’s what they had to say about their experiences.

Magdalene, APHIA Plus intern

Magdalene

Magdalene works with the APHIA Plus Program (AIDS Population and Health Integrated Assistance Plus) and has gained a new sense of professional confidence. “I have enjoyed the opportunity. The team has much trust and confidence in me. My supervisor has guided me well, and I am able to take up new challenges. It makes me feel so proud to be associated with ChildFund.”

Sammy - sponsor relations intern

Sammy interned with sponsor relations.

Sammy felt like a part of the ChildFund team from the very start. “The welcome was awesome! There’s awesome teamwork and the facilities are great. Being in ChildFund makes you grow in all aspects and my experience has been nothing but splendid.”

Elton sponsor relations intern

Elton busy at work in the sponsor relations department.

Elton enjoys the learning opportunities offered by colleagues in the SR department. “The first time I came here, there was a lot of work; being new at it, I wondered if I could perform. I was immediately trained, supported and encouraged. I enjoy the different lunch treats and our many health talks.”

Eric, from the IT department, sees beyond the technical side of his job and realizes the importance of philanthropic work. “ChildFund is an organization that touches lots of lives out there in a very positive way. I have always had a heart to help the needy in whatever way possible, even as a student. I think with the great support from local and international well-wishers, ChildFund can continue to greatly increase the realization of Kenya’s vision.”

Dephine, Finance Intern

Daphine working in the finance department.

Daphine was able to get a behind-the-scenes look while working in the finance department. “When we had a finance meeting, chaired by our finance director, it was so engaging and interactive. I had never attended such a meeting. It felt really good to be included, and I learned a lot regarding my job and building relationships with colleagues.”

When asked her thoughts on organizations partnering with young people, she said, “Youths should be given the opportunity in organizations that nurture their skills and talents. They should be involved in social activities that allow free interaction with their peers to help improve their self-esteem and desire to change their lives.”

And we agree.

As we get ready to celebrate International Youth Day, ChildFund Kenya will continue to motivate our young people in our office and in our programs to join conversations relevant to their daily lives, contribute to ideas that will solve global youth issues and celebrate the power of global collaboration.

Giving Youth a Voice

Reporting by Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

Each year, the U.N. recognizes Aug. 12 as International Youth Day (IYD). Focusing on global initiatives to create and strengthen partnerships with youth, this day is a celebration of the innovation and capabilities of young people to change the world. Activists, philanthropists, politicians and academics will collaborate with young women and men from around the world to address issues such as political inclusion, employment, entrepreneurship, protection of rights and education.

Partnering with youth is a key part of ChildFund’s mission. The work we do around the world encourages young people to use their voices and advocate for their rights to help solve issues in their own communities. Oftentimes, higher education is a youth’s best means to break the cycle of poverty and also give back to the next generation. With the help of dedicated sponsors, youth in ChildFund programs have increased opportunity to not only finish high school but also obtain post-secondary degrees. This has been Kaltuma’s experience.

Kaltuma at University

Kaltuma is entering her second year at Kenya Methodist University.

Born into a family of five children, Kaltuma, 22, is the only member to excel beyond high school. With the help of her sponsor, Susan, Kaltuma is now beginning her second year at Kenya Methodist University. She is studying to receive a degree in clinical medicine; a goal that her sponsor has encouraged her to pursue since high school.

“I am very proud of the support I have received. Someone very far believed in me,” Kaltuma says. “[Susan] made sure there were not obstacles regarding my education.”

Kaltuma’s mother also encourages her to study hard because she knows the benefits of education. “My mother keeps encouraging me to finish my studies,” Kaltuma says. “She tells me with education, my life will be better than hers.”

Kaltuma is one of very few girls in her clinical medicine class and the only student from her community. She is proud of her accomplishments and looks forward to a better future. Upon obtaining her degree, she hopes to land a job in the medical field, have a family of her own, and above all, help young people like herself.

When asked her thoughts on the International Youth Day, she said, “Support a young person today, so that they can be better people and better parents tomorrow.”

Recognizing the woman who has supported her education for many years, Kaltuma insisted on writing a letter to her sponsor before we left. In the letter, she tells Susan how well she did on her latest exam and thanks her for her help.

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