Kenya

Partnering With Youth

By Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

In the spirit of this year’s International Youth Day theme, Building a Better World: Partnering with Youth, ChildFund Kenya invited its team of interns to share their thoughts on working with ChildFund this summer. The Kenya office provided various hands-on learning opportunities to help prepare these young people for future employment. Here’s what they had to say about their experiences.

Magdalene, APHIA Plus intern

Magdalene

Magdalene works with the APHIA Plus Program (AIDS Population and Health Integrated Assistance Plus) and has gained a new sense of professional confidence. “I have enjoyed the opportunity. The team has much trust and confidence in me. My supervisor has guided me well, and I am able to take up new challenges. It makes me feel so proud to be associated with ChildFund.”

Sammy - sponsor relations intern

Sammy interned with sponsor relations.

Sammy felt like a part of the ChildFund team from the very start. “The welcome was awesome! There’s awesome teamwork and the facilities are great. Being in ChildFund makes you grow in all aspects and my experience has been nothing but splendid.”

Elton sponsor relations intern

Elton busy at work in the sponsor relations department.

Elton enjoys the learning opportunities offered by colleagues in the SR department. “The first time I came here, there was a lot of work; being new at it, I wondered if I could perform. I was immediately trained, supported and encouraged. I enjoy the different lunch treats and our many health talks.”

Eric, from the IT department, sees beyond the technical side of his job and realizes the importance of philanthropic work. “ChildFund is an organization that touches lots of lives out there in a very positive way. I have always had a heart to help the needy in whatever way possible, even as a student. I think with the great support from local and international well-wishers, ChildFund can continue to greatly increase the realization of Kenya’s vision.”

Dephine, Finance Intern

Daphine working in the finance department.

Daphine was able to get a behind-the-scenes look while working in the finance department. “When we had a finance meeting, chaired by our finance director, it was so engaging and interactive. I had never attended such a meeting. It felt really good to be included, and I learned a lot regarding my job and building relationships with colleagues.”

When asked her thoughts on organizations partnering with young people, she said, “Youths should be given the opportunity in organizations that nurture their skills and talents. They should be involved in social activities that allow free interaction with their peers to help improve their self-esteem and desire to change their lives.”

And we agree.

As we get ready to celebrate International Youth Day, ChildFund Kenya will continue to motivate our young people in our office and in our programs to join conversations relevant to their daily lives, contribute to ideas that will solve global youth issues and celebrate the power of global collaboration.

Giving Youth a Voice

Reporting by Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

Each year, the U.N. recognizes Aug. 12 as International Youth Day (IYD). Focusing on global initiatives to create and strengthen partnerships with youth, this day is a celebration of the innovation and capabilities of young people to change the world. Activists, philanthropists, politicians and academics will collaborate with young women and men from around the world to address issues such as political inclusion, employment, entrepreneurship, protection of rights and education.

Partnering with youth is a key part of ChildFund’s mission. The work we do around the world encourages young people to use their voices and advocate for their rights to help solve issues in their own communities. Oftentimes, higher education is a youth’s best means to break the cycle of poverty and also give back to the next generation. With the help of dedicated sponsors, youth in ChildFund programs have increased opportunity to not only finish high school but also obtain post-secondary degrees. This has been Kaltuma’s experience.

Kaltuma at University

Kaltuma is entering her second year at Kenya Methodist University.

Born into a family of five children, Kaltuma, 22, is the only member to excel beyond high school. With the help of her sponsor, Susan, Kaltuma is now beginning her second year at Kenya Methodist University. She is studying to receive a degree in clinical medicine; a goal that her sponsor has encouraged her to pursue since high school.

“I am very proud of the support I have received. Someone very far believed in me,” Kaltuma says. “[Susan] made sure there were not obstacles regarding my education.”

Kaltuma’s mother also encourages her to study hard because she knows the benefits of education. “My mother keeps encouraging me to finish my studies,” Kaltuma says. “She tells me with education, my life will be better than hers.”

Kaltuma is one of very few girls in her clinical medicine class and the only student from her community. She is proud of her accomplishments and looks forward to a better future. Upon obtaining her degree, she hopes to land a job in the medical field, have a family of her own, and above all, help young people like herself.

When asked her thoughts on the International Youth Day, she said, “Support a young person today, so that they can be better people and better parents tomorrow.”

Recognizing the woman who has supported her education for many years, Kaltuma insisted on writing a letter to her sponsor before we left. In the letter, she tells Susan how well she did on her latest exam and thanks her for her help.

A Photo Diary: Day of the African Child Events

Having children in our ChildFund programs participate in the Day of the African Child ceremonies at the African Union earlier this month was a shining moment. We asked Joan Ng’ang’a, communications officer for ChildFund Kenya, to post about the experience of traveling with the children from Kenya to Ethiopia.

Wednesday, 13 June
It is 11 a.m. when Jane and James meet for the first time. Discussing what they hope to get out of the trip, their respective projects, and the excitement of flying for the first time, both students are anxious to start their voyage.

One hour before check-in, Jane and James get their passports. They have waited a long time but it is worth it. We get to the airport at 4:20 p.m., check in and proceed to gate number 7 for boarding.

“You mean, they just jump off the ground,” James questions, as he watches a plane take off for the first time. We all laugh. Our flight takes off as scheduled at 6:20 p.m.

three women

Joan (center) catches up with ChildFund colleagues.

We land at Bole Airport in Ethiopia around 8:40 p.m. and are warmly greeted by Tenagne Mekonnen, ChildFund’s regional communications manager in Africa. It’s been nearly a year since our last meeting, so I am excited to see her and she is happy to finally meet Jane and James. After dinner, the children run off to recite their work. Everyone is in bed by 10 p.m.; it has been a long day.

Thursday 14 June
On Thursday, we rise with the sun around 6 a.m. We enjoy a good breakfast and meet the team from Gambia for introductions. We meet Abdulahi and Ramatoulie for the first time. Together, we ride to the U.N. complex in our van. We really like our van because it displays our countries’ names.

boy and girl with ambassador

Abdulahi and Ramatoulie meet with the deputy head of mission at The Gambia’s embassy.

Today is the day that all the children, from Ethiopia, The Gambia and Kenya, will compete in a Q&A before the African Union. They will also be able to share their prepared art work. Both Jane and James read their poems. We conclude the day with a lunch and a visit to the Gambian embassy. It has been an exciting first day.

Friday 15 June

boy and girl

James and Jane in their traditional dress.

On Friday, by 7:30 a.m., we have all had breakfast and the children have dressed in their traditional attire. The fabrics and colors of their clothing display their rich African culture. They are proud to represent their countries.

On our way in, James sees the Kenyan flag and we take some pictures. I am truly humbled to finally arrive at the African Union, a place I had only read about over the last 10 years. We take even more photos!

Our sessions begin at 10 a.m. with opening remarks from the Commissioner of Social Affairs, followed by more speeches from the organizers and representatives from the government of Ethiopia and ChildFund International. Like celebrities, the children get interviewed by two radio stations. Someone from a local newspaper interviews James, as well. Before long, the children are treated to tea time. They really like the break and enjoy their cake and soda.

After lunch, we tour the University of Addis Ababa’s museum. There we absorb the history and culture of Ethiopia. We are all fascinated by the stuffed lion at the entrance of the museum. It looked so real!

Saturday 16 June
Today is the actual anniversary of the uprising in Soweto, South Africa, in 1976. But since it’s a weekend, the children are allowed to sleep until 7:30 a.m. After breakfast, we all head to the Arada community to visit a children’s art club. Abdulahi speaks on behalf of the group. He briefly recaps the last two days of our stay in Ethiopia and the children get to know each other. Split into four groups, the children break off to view and learn more about pieces of art posted in the club. Some of us learn a new word, today: Jambo – hello in Swahili.

children in traditional dress

ChildFund Regional Director Jumbe Sebunya welcomes the children.

Our van picks us up at 5:30 p.m. and takes us to the awards ceremony and closing reception at the African Union. A surprise to us, Tenagne brings ice cream! We arrive at the AU and meet ChildFund’s regional director for Eastern and Southern Africa, Jumbe Sebunya, with whom the children take photos. The highlight of the evening is the presenting of awards by ChildFund. We are excited when Jane wins first place in literature in the high school group and James wins first place in literature for the middle school group. We take more photos than ever at this event!

Monday 18 June

Kenya children and ChildFund National director

ChildFund Kenya’s National Director Victor Koyi congratulates the children on their achievement.

It is 8:15 a.m. and we have arrived at the airport. We depart from gate number 7 and before long, the plane lands in Nairobi. We are finally home. James and Jane meet with ChildFund Kenya National Director Victor Koyi for a debrief. They tell him about their exciting trip, yet we all express happiness to be home!

Drought in Turkana Brings a New Resiliency

by Joan Ng’ang’a, ChildFund Kenya

Arid landscape

Drought and desperation.

Last year, Kenya’s Turkana region was the hub of disaster. The drought had bitten hard, as evidenced by the bare landscape, pocked with livestock carcasses and dried up vegetation. Families moved away from their homes in search of food, water and pasture for the livestock that remained.

child lying on ground

Displaced and hungry.

Children and women bore the brunt of the disaster as malnutrition, illnesses and death became common. This was not the first drought experienced in the area. But it was the worst in many, many years. A strong community was brought to its knees by disease, hunger and desperation.

Growing crops

A new beginning.

Women farmers

Hard work yields crops.

healthy girl

Healthy children.

To survive, many families began to embrace farming as an alternative to a nomadic pastoral lifestyle. With agricultural training and support from ChildFund, women are farming huge gardens that now stretch along River Turkwell. And they are producing enough maize, sorghum, beans and vegetables to feed their families. These gardens have attracted settlements of traditional pastoralists. Through the sale of crops such as sorghum, household incomes and food security are increasing. Children are growing healthy and strong.

women carrying man

Celebrating ChildFund's assistance.

Excitement ran high in the community when Jumbe Sebunya, ChildFund’s regional director for East and South Africa, recently visited the garden projects. As they carried Jumbe shoulder high, the women sang of their past struggles. They also sang of the great joy they now feel as a result of the hard work and the change they have embraced.

Dedicated to their children’s survival,these resilient women are saving a generation.

women celebrate in song

A song of hope.

Around the Globe with ChildFund in 31 Days: Fire Brings Heartbreak to Mukuru, Kenya

31 in 31 logoOver the course of January’s 31 days, we’re making a blog stop in each country where we serve children, thanks to the generous support of our sponsors and donors. Today we travel with Missions in Action to ChildFund’s programs Kenya.

More than 400 people perished when fire erupted in a large urban slum in Nairobi, Kenya, in September 2011. The fire added an extra layer of hardship to an already difficult living environment.

Alex Boylan, the host of the web reality series Missions in Action (MIA), travels to the Mukuru community to check in with children and families who are recovering from the fire. Many children like Steven are receiving assistance from ChildFund programs made possible through sponsorship support.

Watch the video on MIAtv.

Discover more about ChildFund’s programs in Kenya and how you can sponsor a child.

Santa’s ChildFund Helpers Hard at Work

by Karen Chieng, ChildFund Kenya intern

They may not be based at the North Pole, but ChildFund employees are paving the way for a happy holiday for children in our programs.

ChildFund employee with letters and computer

ChildFund Kenya's sponsorship team processes holiday mail for children.

Right now, ChildFund offices around the world are abuzz with various activities. It’s one of the busiest times of the year for our organization. As much as opportunities to be of service to others surround us every day, our commitment becomes heightened during this season of giving.

ChildFund employees process mail

With just a few days to go before the holidays, Santa's helpers in Kenya are making sure cards and letters get to children.

As sponsors continue to show their love and support toward the children by sending Christmas and holiday greetings, ChildFund employees are happy to play the role of Santa’s helpers. In each of our national offices, a team is busily working to ensure that children receive their letters in time to celebrate the season. After all, photos, cards and letters are the crucial links in the chain of friendship between sponsors and children.

So as the mail keeps pouring in from thoughtful sponsors, we’re making our list and checking it twice to ensure speedy delivery. We know children are eagerly awaiting the latest news, updates and small gifts from their sponsors.

We take joy in spreading good cheer and love this time of year.

Teaching from the Heart Not Just the Book

by Karen Chieng, ChildFund Kenya intern

Alfred Wambua Kimanthi, 46, loves his work as deputy head teacher at Kyangwithi Secondary School in Kitui, Kenya. When he pauses to reflect and tell his story, he notes that his life could have turned out much differently.

Kenya teacher

Alfred Kimanthi

Growing up in abject poverty under the care of his grandfather who could barely provide basic necessities, Alfred, nonetheless, held the dream of becoming a teacher close to his heart.

His first break came in primary school when he was enrolled in ChildFund’s sponsorship program. He later managed to sit for his final exams and passed with flying colors, attaining his Certificate for Primary Education. “I remain indebted to my sponsor whose assistance enabled me to successfully complete my studies, a launch pad that set me toward my dream of becoming an educator,” says Alfred.

As he continues to tell his story, one can hardly miss the bevy of students constantly coming up to him for consultation. “A teacher affects eternity. He can never tell where the influence stops,” he says. It’s an adage he has come to know well in his profession.

One of his most memorable experiences as a physics and mathematics teacher was contributing to the rise of female enrollment at a school he was posted to in northeastern Kenya. This is an area rife with the cultural practice of early marriage for girls, since education is often deemed fit for the male child only.

Working closely with local authorities, Alfred persuaded community leaders and families to allow girls to attend school. He also engineered the promotion of science education for girls, succeeding in making physics the number two best-performed subject at an all-girls school in Kitui. The school became known for the quality of its science education, contributing to an increased number of female engineers in the area.

At his current teaching post, Alfred continues to pass the baton to eager learners. He credits ChildFund for its drive to empower young minds through knowledge. It’s a mission he shares with passion.

A Visit with Iria

In a visit to a sponsored child’s home in Kenya, ChildFund President Anne Lynam Goddard learns from Iria’s family how they have benefited from their son’s enrollment in ChildFund’s sponsorship program. Iria attends school, sleeps under a donated mosquito net and has access to clean water.

The High Price of Malnutrition

At Early Child Care and Development Centers across drought-stricken northern Kenya, ChildFund is providing a daily meal to young children and monitoring their health status. One way to spot malnutrition is to measure the circumference of a child’s upper arm, explains Anne Lynam Goddard, ChildFund’s president and CEO, who recently visited our programs in Turkana.

Children who are severely malnourished at a young age often suffer developmental deficiencies the rest of their lives.

Join Anne on ChildFund’s Facebook page, Sept. 7, 12-12:30 p.m. (EDT), for a discussion of the Horn of Africa drought. Anne will be sharing her recent experiences visiting children and answering your questions. To post a question, you’ll first need to “like” ChildFund on Facebook.

We’d like to invite you to respond, too.  Consider skipping lunch on Wednesday and donating that $10 to our ChildAlert emergency fund for the drought.  It’s easy: Just grab your cell phone and text “RESPOND” to 90999 (message and data rates may apply).  Alternatively, you may make a donation for drought relief through our website.

Then use your lunch break to join Anne on Facebook to learn more about the drought.

One Mother’s Story of Drought

While her husband seeks work, Lopeyok, 32, struggles to care for their seven young children in northern Kenya, where drought conditions have become severe. She relies on ChildFund’s Early Child Care and Development Center (ECCD) for her children’s only meal of the day.

The mother and her children also expend precious energy collecting water at a borehole in neighboring Lokitaung district. The four-hour walk each day is hot and exhausting.

ChildFund is delivering 112 metric tons of cooking oil and a nutritional porridge mix for Kenya’s hard-hit regions, targeting children 5 and younger.

The need is great and predicted to grow as drought severity increases across the Horn of Africa.

To learn more about the drought and ChildFund’s response, join Anne Lynam Goddard, president and CEO, for a Facebook wall chat at noon (EDT) on Wednesday, Sept. 7. Anne recently returned from Kenya where she visited with children and families who are struggling to survive the worst drought the region has experienced in 60 years.

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