livestock

It’s Goat Season!

rs38625_160810_044-lpr

Annet,13, holds a goat her family keeps in Kamuli, Uganda. Photo by Jake Lyell.

Each fall, the pictures of children with their goats show up. They are adorable, without fail. Look at Annet, holding her baby goat in the picture above!

Of course, goats mean a great deal to many families ChildFund works with. Goats produce milk, which can become cheese, and they reproduce quickly. A small herd of goats can help keep children well nourished and provide families with extra income when they sell surplus milk and cheese.

Just before the holidays, we release our Real Gifts Catalog, offering items requested by families in countries around the world. Goats are a perennial favorite, both of families and donors.

My colleague in Kenya, Maureen Siele, interviewed a man whose family received a goat through ChildFund’s catalog (which you can find online here). Daniel says, “Before we received the goat, we were not as healthy as we are today. We rarely drank milk. Occasionally, we would buy milk, but it is very expensive. We could not afford even to make proper tea. We also struggled to buy other household items like sugar and flour, because I did not have the money that I am currently making from selling the surplus milk.”

And today, they have four goats. It’s a great start for a family in need.

Fredrick’s Success Story: ‘I Can Be an Engineer’

By Sharon Ishimwe, ChildFund Uganda

Fredrick’s family grew their own food in eastern Uganda, like many other families in their village. They used the food for their meals and sold the extra vegetables. It was enough to help the family get by, but the income was too low to send Fredrick and his six siblings to school.

young man with goats

Fredrick has bought farm animals with the help of his sponsor, which has increased his family’s income.

Fortunately, Fredrick, who is now 21, gained a sponsor through ChildFund in 2000. He was able to go to school then; and, today, he’s on his way to becoming a mechanical engineer. For most youths, sponsorship ends in their teens, but some sponsors continue to assist when a young adult pursues higher education.

As a child, Fredrick went to Magombe Primary School.

“When I first went to school,” he says, “I felt hopeless because I didn’t see a bright future in education. My parents were poor. I didn’t think I’d reach this level of education.”

But Fredrick worked hard and completed school with top grades. By this point, he knew that he wanted to be an engineer. So he remained optimistic and focused.

young man in field

Fredrick plans to become an engineer, a goal that is within sight because of income from his livestock.

The assurance he got from his sponsor, Kathryn, through letters and gifts gave him confidence and the hope that he could achieve his goal. When Fredrick finally sat for his A-level exams in 2012, he scored an outstanding 15 points in physics, chemistry, mathematics and economics. With such a stellar performance, Fredrick feels his dream has drawn even closer.

He’s also working to earn his own income. Fredrick received one heifer through a ChildFund project and used monetary gifts from his sponsor to purchase a second heifer. Over time, these animals have multiplied to seven, and with proceeds from the sale of milk and calves, he has bought seven goats. The milk from all these animals has been of great help to the family, as they sell it and also use some of it at home.

“This helped me realize I could reach my dream with even the little I have,” Fredrick says. He plans to start his engineering training in January 2014.

The family has also managed to build a semi-permanent house, which is a major step forward from the mud-and-grass-thatched house they lived in before.    

“I thank ChildFund and my sponsor Kathryn for supporting me. I can now be an engineer,” Fredrick says.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,063 other subscribers

ChildFund
Follow me on Twitter