photography

Reflections of Life in Kenya

Reporting by ChildFund Kenya

Children enrolled in ChildFund’s programs near Nairobi participated in an art exhibition featuring photos and paintings they made, often depicting their surroundings.

 

Weslyne

Weslyne and his photo.

Weslyne, who is 13, shows a photo he took of the Dandora dump near his home. Covering an area of 30 acres, the dump accepts about 850 tons of solid waste generated daily by the 3.5 million inhabitants of the city of Nairobi, Kenya. The dump, which is the largest in Africa,was once a quarry that the City Council of Nairobi sought to use temporarily. But it still exists, 40 years later, despite having been declared full.

Residents have to live with the stench, trash and dirt. Waste pickers pounce on trash once it is offloaded by incoming trucks. Birds, pigs and people scavenge heaps of rubbish for food, scrap metal, polythene bottles and bags, which are often sold. Weslyne explains that the dump also attracts children and youth who would rather scavenge than go to school. His photo shows a boy drinking water from a bottle that was probably scavenged from the trash.

Dennis and his painting.

Dennis and his painting.

Dennis, 14, also lives in Dandora. He explains that many children in his school smoke. Because of lack of parental guidance and peer pressure, boys will begin to start smoking to “fit in, be cool and be adultlike.”

 

Regina and her photograph.

Regina and her photograph.

Regina, 14, comes from Mukuru’s fuata nyayo (the Swahili term for outskirts). Mukuru is a slum on the eastern side of Nairobi. It is one of the largest slums in the city, with a population of around 700,000. Mukuru is sub-divided into eight villages and is located in the middle of the main industrial area of the city, bordering the Nairobi River. It is characterized by congestion, narrow alleys, poor drainage, lack of sanitary facilities and open sewers. Regina explains that her photo shows children walking alone and dangerously close to the edge of the river.

Check Out Caio’s Photographs

 

Caio

A self-portrait of 15-year-old Caio, whose pictures illustrate the WHO’s new adolescent health report.

A few months ago, we wrote about Caio, a young man from Brazil who was one of 10 teens chosen to take photos for the World Health Organization’s adolescent health report. He’s a sponsored child and participates in the ChildFund-supported Photovoice program in Brazil. Now the WHO’s report has been released, and you can see Caio’s images (here and here). We encourage you to read the whole report, which quotes teens from around the world about health concerns affecting their communities.

In Belarus, Oleg Reaches Beyond Perceived Limits

By Elena Karpenko, ChildFund Belarus

As we conclude our 75th anniversary blog series, we are focusing on success stories of youth and alumni from ChildFund’s programs in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe. Today, we meet Oleg of Belarus, in Eastern Europe.

Belarus’ 119,000 children with special needs, including about 30,000 with disabilities, often have problems gaining access to good education and services. They also cope with deeply ingrained social exclusion.

Oleg

Oleg, a budding photographer in Belarus.

Oleg, a teenage boy who is affected by musculoskeletal issues, often felt like he couldn’t express himself. He wanted to show others that his life has meaning, but Oleg didn’t have the tools.

But life took a turn for the better when Oleg enrolled in a course offered by ChildFund Belarus called Leadership Without Limitations, part of a USAID-funded project, Community Services to Vulnerable Groups.

ChildFund achieved or exceeded all its annual targets, including improved capacity in 170 disability-focused organizations, more services for 535 children with disabilities, training for 257 parents and family members, incorporation of inclusive approaches in nine educational settings and other successful advocacy efforts.

Through the course, Oleg has learned how to take photos, which you see below.

birds in Belarus

One of Oleg’s photos.

His mother suggested a photography exhibit for the youth in his course, and ChildFund Belarus staff members embraced the idea. More than 120 people came to the event, which focused on organizations that help people with disabilities.

trees in Belarus

A towering forest in Belarus.

“I didn’t even think that the exhibition could change my life so much,” says Oleg. “If I hadn’t taken part in the course, I would never have come to the idea of exhibiting my photos.”

After the ChildFund event, he was invited to photograph a fashion show featuring children with disabilities, and those pictures were displayed in Oleg’s school. All of a sudden, people saw beyond Oleg’s disability: Here was a person with strength, talent and capabilities.

sunset in Belarus

A flaming sunset in Belarus.

Brazilian Teen Wins International Photo Contest

Caio photo

In this award-winning photo taken by Brazilian teen Caio at a crowded local clinic, an elderly man in a wheelchair is examined in the hallway.

By Priscila Oliveira, ChildFund Brasil

A long wait at a community clinic led to an international photography award for a Brazilian boy who is sponsored through ChildFund. 

Caio, who is 15, participates in ChildFund Brasil’s project Photovoice, which provides cameras and photography training to youth. He submitted photos to a contest held by the World Health Organization last year that was open to teens from ages 14 to 19.

Caio portrait

Caio, 15, has learned about photography through the ChildFund-supported program Photovoice.

“Teacher Daniel spoke to our class about the contest and nobody took it very seriously. I had an appointment that same week at the community clinic,” Caio says. “I took the camera and tried to entertain myself. While waiting, I photographed a few things I felt good about and things that made me very upset, such as a woman in a wheelchair who was in pain and waited for a long time.”

Caio’s photos were among 450 pictures produced by 77 teens in 33 countries. Five professional photographers, as well as a young doctor, chose the top 10 photos, and Caio was the only Brazilian selected. The other winners are from Argentina, India, Malawi, Pakistan, Philippines, Slovenia, Ukraine and the United States.

The teens, including Caio, won the opportunity to be contributing photographers for the WHO’s Health for the World Adolescents report, set to be published in May. The new photos, dealing with health care and teens, will also become part of the WHO’s digital library and in future publications, and each teen will receive a $1,000 stipend for their work. 

“I really like the Photovoice project and learned many things about photographs,” Caio says. “I began to see that a picture can speak. We can shoot and show everyone what we like and don’t like through the image produced. I made many friends, too.”

waiting room

In another photo submitted to the WHO contest, Caio captures the frustration on the faces of people waiting to see a doctor at a clinic.

Caio’s been sponsored for 12 years, and besides the Photovoice project, he participates in a computer course and sports activities held by ChildFund Brasil’s local partner organization, Child’s Search for New Life – Gcriva.

When Caio started going to ChildFund-supported programs, he was a shy boy who had difficulty communicating and writing. But today he is becoming more confident and feeling more support. With the opportunity to speak out, he has developed better communication skills and interacts more with his peers.

“When I was younger, I wrote a letter to my sponsor couple, and I thought that sponsorship was only that: writing letters,” Caio says. “As I grew older, I began to participate in the sports activities, computer classes and now the photography course. Sponsorship is good, because if it were not for our sponsors we would not have that.”

clinic waiting room

In this winning photo, some people waiting at the clinic begin talking loudly and making critical comments, according to Caio.

Fashion Forward for ChildFund Brazil

Reporting by Luza Marinho, ChildFund Brasil

model wears T-Shirt

Cris Guerra models the new Victor Dzenk-designed T-shirt. Sales will benefit ChildFund Brasil’s programs. Photo: Luíza Villarroel

Spring fashion week in Minas Gerais, Brazil, took on an added dimension this year with the much-anticipated release of a T-shirt designed by Victor Dzenk. Proceeds from sales of the shirt will benefit children in ChildFund programs.

More than 200 journalists, designers and fashion followers turned out to preview the noted Brazilian designer’s 2013 summer collection. The show included the release of the special T-shirt. Internationally known for his avant-garde prints, Dzenk is also focused on social responsibility.

group photo of Photovoice project members

Cris Guerra and Victor Dzenk support the youth photography project. Photo: Agência Fotosite

“Last year in Rio de Janeiro, we created a T-shirt for the breast cancer foundation with a pink bow. It was beautiful and a great success! We want to repeat [that success] working with children from ChildFund Brasil,” he said. “ChildFund Brasil is a serious and respected organization. It is very gratifying to add beauty and an art project.”

celebrity at fashion show

Gloria Kalil at the fashion show. Photo: Jorge Quintão

Celebrities such as fashion consultant Gloria Kalil and members of the national and world press became acquainted with ChildFund’s mission, while snapping up the designer shirts. Fashion model and blogger Cris Guerra shared with the audience her experience of nearly 10 years as a ChildFund sponsor. Her stories about Fernando, her sponsored child, touched everyone.

The event also featured a special exhibit of photos taken by photographer Luíza Villarroel and students in the ChildFund-supported Photovoice project. A few days before the fashion show, the students had the incredible opportunity of photographing Guerra—sporting the Dzenk T-shirt—in their own community of Sierra Cluster.

model against stone wall

Scenes from the street. Photo: Luíza Villarroel

Seeming unaffected by the glamor of the moment, the student photographers lost no time in determining the shots they needed and then capturing street scenes with Cris as their focal point.

boys with cameras

Students in the Photovoice project. Photo: ChildFund Brasil

The Photovoice project teaches children and youth how to use photos, videos and other communication techniques to express their views and their voices. The 2012 workshops are focusing on social identity as revealed through self-portraits and portraits of community residents—capturing life histories, recording the daily life of students and exchanging “looks” and experiences.

Discover more about ChildFund’s work in Brazil.

Keeping Children’s Early Childhood Needs in Sharp Focus

Photos from ChildFund’s programs in Indonesia and Timor Leste are among the winners of the Asia-Pacific Regional Network for Early Childhood (ARNEC) photo contest.

This year’s photographic theme, “Inclusive Foundations for Early Childhood: Working Together to Reach the Unreached,” sought to spotlight good care practices within the region.

Photographer Nic Dunlop captured the winning images of children thriving in ChildFund’s Leopa Day Care Center in Timor Leste and a community health center in West Jakarta, Indonesia.

The photos will be featured on the ARNEC website and widely distributed via ARNEC’s 2011 calendar.

Here’s a sneak peek at ChildFund’s winning photos.

Infant nutrition is a key focus for the Bina Kasih community health center in Tangerang, West Jakarta, Indonesia. Photographer: Nic Dunlop

Octavius plays at the Leopa Day Care center, an early childhood development (primary school) facility in Timor Leste’s Liquica district. Photographer: Nic Dunlop

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