The Gambia

World Malaria Day: Saving Lives Through Education

Every 30 seconds, a child dies from malaria. In The Gambia, as well as in many other countries, ChildFund is educating children about this deadly disease, and how it can be prevented. Meet Lamine and Binta.

Innovation Brings Water to a Community in The Gambia

by Tenagne Mekonnen, ChildFund Africa Regional Communications Manager

Water is a big challenge in our region; so I find myself thinking a lot about World Water Day, commemorated each year on March 22. In Africa, people travel long distances and stand in long queues to get water. Sometimes the water runs out before those in line can fill their containers. They return home empty handed. A lot of time is wasted waiting to get water — time that could have been spent doing other things.

In some areas even if there is water, it’s unsafe for drinking or cooking. So I thought of sharing with you my visit to The Gambia, where I had the opportunity to see the water pyramid, operated by the Ding Ding Bantaba Child and Family Support Association, a ChildFund affiliate.

Water pyramid in The Gambia

Water is stored below ground before the pyramid is expanded.

Sibanor village is the capital of the Foni Bintang Karanai District in the Western Division. As the capital, it is also the commerce center for several satellite villages as well as many in the Cassamance region. Sibanor is rapidly increasing in size and now has a population of 4,000.

For years, Sibanor lacked clean and accessible water for human consumption. Most of the community’s wells produce brackish water not fit for drinking or preparing food. Nor is the water ideal for laundry, as it does not readily form lather with soap.

As the population has increased, so has the water problem. Because only three hand pumps were producing good-tasting water, residents of the newest settlements started traveling some distances to nearby villages to obtain water.

Water pyramid blown erect

The water pyramid is fully expanded.

Those living around the ChildFund-supported Early Childhood Development center fetched water from the covered hand pump well in the village. The rest shared the remaining two pumps resulting in long queues. Women lined up around these pumps as early as 6 a.m. and as late as 10 p.m., waiting for the overused wells to refill.

Water storage tanks

Water storage tanks

For years, community leaders tried different options to get clean water but without success. Some families resorted to using unsafe drinking water from locally dug and uncovered wells that had better taste. The main borehole was re-dug in 2001, but, unfortunately, it produced the same poor-quality water. The community endured 20 years with no improvement in the water supply. A radical shift in approach was needed.

In a bid to address the situation, Ding Ding Bantaba Child and Family Support Association, working with ChildFund and the Dutch organisation Aqua Aero Water System BV, succeeded in getting a water project proposal funded by the World Bank.

This grant has built a water pyramid, which consists of a borehole and a rainwater collection system that provides clean and sufficient water (up to 5,000 liters per day) to serve the entire population of Sibanor and surrounding villages.

This innovative water system also provides distilled water for hospital use and for battery refilling. Testing has proven the water to be the cleanest and safest drinking source in the country based on national and international standards.

Water packaging process

Community workers package water into packets.

ChildFund played a role in negotiating the grant project and provided on-site supervision as the water pyramid was constructed. We worked closely with community members to engage them in the project and involve them in carrying out the nontechnical aspects of construction.

Today, ChildFund continues to monitor the viability of the community-operated enterprise and ensure water-quality controls remain in place.

Numerous sponsored children and their families in Sibanor are now benefitting from clean water. It’s a victory to celebrate on World Water Day.

Youth Sets Goals for Her Future

Guest post by Fatoumatta, age 20, The Gambia


My dream in life is to be an economist and a child activist.

Being a child activist has been a dream since I was a kid. I had this dream because I surveyed life and the environment, and I came to a conclusion that children in particular have been traumatized in all aspects of their lives.

So that is why I decided that I have to be a child activist — to at least fight the issues that are happening in our environment. I’m talking about a child not being sent to school or being raped, and how those things are affecting children in our environment.

So I deem it necessary to be a person to at least make their voices to be heard. At times, I do go to their compounds and make surveys, and I find out that a child has been traumatized. So I do advocate with the parents about how to implement the right things to do.

Also being an economist is my dream because I love economics, ever since I was in senior secondary school. I studied it and am still studying it. My dream is to have a master’s degree, and that is what I am working on right now.

I do not want a car or a house; I just want to finish my education with a master’s degree in economics.

Fatoumatta is a youth leader in ChildFund programs in The Gambia, where she is also receiving support for her dreams.

Twitter Chickens

Chickens provide nutritious meals through eggs and meat, and they also provide a way to make money. But what you’re about to see are no ordinary chickens – these are Twitter chickens, made possible by the first 2,200 ChildFund followers on Twitter back in July.31 in 31

As part of the Twitter campaign, we promised to send items from our Gifts of Love and Hope catalog to areas that needed them the most – for every 200 followers to sign up during the campaign, a gift would be given from an anonymous donor, who was willing to contribute above the usual donation. One of those gifts was a set of chickens for a community in The Gambia.

As “31 in 31” rolls into The Gambia today, we want to share with you via video the second gift made possible by the Twitter campaign. For the first video, click here to see goats in Zambia.

For more on our work in The Gambia, click here.

More on The Gambia
Population: 1.7 million
ChildFund beneficiaries: More than 544,000 children and families
Did You Know?: The Gambia is the smallest country on mainland Africa. Senegal borders The Gambia to the north, east and south; the country has a small coast on the Atlantic Ocean to the west.

Twitter Gifts are on Their Way

By David Hylton,
Public Relations Specialist

It has taken just a little longer than we anticipated, but the gifts for children and families in four African countries made possible by our Twitter campaign in July are in transit.

As part of our Twitter campaign, Flip video cameras have arrived in The Gambia and Zambia.

As part of our Twitter campaign, Flip video cameras have arrived in The Gambia and Zambia.

To give you a brief recap, the Twitter campaign worked like this: every 200 followers @ChildFund received during two weeks in July meant a gift from our Gifts of Love and Hope catalog to one of the countries. The gifts were made possible by an anonymous donor who went above their usual giving amount. You can read more about our campaign here.

When the campaign ended July 27, we had more than 2,200 followers, which meant 11 gifts. Two sets of chickens are now headed to a school in The Gambia; three goats are going to families in Zambia; three sets of 15 grafted mango trees will be planted in Kenya; and three sets of vegetable seeds will soon arrive in Ethiopia.

These donations are about much more than the actual item. Each item represents a livelihood for a family, income, responsibility, and, most importantly, an opportunity for a brighter future thanks to each of you.

Small video cameras have already been shipped to The Gambia and Zambia and we expect footage from those areas in the coming weeks. As the videos arrive back in our U.S. headquarters in Richmond, Va., we will share them with you. Due to delivery issues to remote parts of the world and technology issues with slow Internet connections in many areas where we work, getting information from our program areas takes time and patience from everyone involved.

Thanks to everyone for following and helping to change the lives of 11 children and their families.

For more information about ChildFund International, visit

The Next Step

By David Hylton,
Public Relations Specialist

Thank you, thank you, thank you! We can’t say it enough! On July 10 when we launched our Twitter campaign, we didn’t quite know what to expect. We knew we’d get a lot of new followers, but perhaps we underestimated the generosity of people out there. For everyone who lent a hand in this – THANK YOU! Twitter

As the campaign ended at noon today, we had more than 2,200 followers – that’s 11 gifts to help deprived, excluded and vulnerable children and families in The Gambia, Zambia, Kenya and Ethiopia. (For more information on the campaign and how it worked, click here to read our initial post and here when we reached 1,500 followers.)

Now that this campaign is over, what’s next? Thanks to anonymous donors who are going above their usual giving amount for this campaign, children and families will receive the following gifts:

• Chickens for a school in The Gambia
• A goat for a family farm in Zambia
• Mango trees in Kenya
• Vegetable seeds in Ethiopia

Over the next few days, we will ship the items to the program areas so they can be put to immediate use. During this process, we are working with ChildFund International employees in those countries to film video and take pictures so that you can see how following us on Twitter helped children living in poverty. It’s a commitment from us to hold an accountable dialogue with you.

We expect this process may take a couple of months to complete. Due to delivery issues to remote parts of the world and technology issues with slow Internet connections in many areas where we work, getting information from our program areas takes time and patience from everyone involved.

Now that the Twitter campaign is over, it certainly doesn’t mean that our presence there is disappearing. We’ll continue to post updates about ChildFund, answer questions followers may have, retweet others’ posts on topics we find relevant and much more. This campaign is only the beginning of our conversation.

Twitter Campaign Enters Its Final Days

Our Twitter campaign is drawing to a close – it will officially end at noon Monday, July 27 (by noon we mean on the East Coast in the U.S.). This campaign started July 10 as a way to bring awareness Children in Africato the needs of children and families in four African countries. For every 200 followers @ChildFund receives, agricultural gifts will be given to families and children in The Gambia, Zambia, Kenya and Ethiopia from our Gifts of Love and Hope catalog.

So far we have more than 2,000 followers — that means 10 gifts to help children and families in those countries. These gifts are being made possible by donors giving above their usual amount.

We’d once again like to thank several blogs and followers on Twitter for bringing awareness to this campaign, in addition to ones we have already mentioned:

Triple Pundit 
NetWits Think Tank
Social Butterfly
YouthKi Awaaz 

Once the campaign ends, we’ll send the gifts to the communities. We’re also sending small video cameras so we can share firsthand how these gifts make a difference in the lives of the individuals and the community. We want you to know that your efforts are leading to the well-being of the world. Continue to check back for additional details in the coming weeks.

For more information about ChildFund International, please visit

Follow Us on Twitter, Help the World’s Children

Follow us on Twitter and you can make the difference in the lives of children. Really. It’s that simple.

To celebrate our new name and our commitment to children, we’re giving agriculture gifts from our Gifts of Love and Hope catalog to children and families for every 200 Twitter followers we receive. Twitter

These efforts will directly benefit children in The Gambia, Zambia, Kenya and Ethiopia. There is no cap on followers, and the offer will continue through July 27. Each country has different needs so the gifts vary:

• Chickens for a school in The Gambia
• A goat for a family farm in Zambia
• Mango trees in Kenya
• Vegetable seeds in Ethiopia

As part of the effort, ChildFund International is sending Flip video cameras to program offices in each of the four countries to report back. We’ll share the recipients’ stories and photos with you. We want to share how your efforts and these items benefit children and their communities. It is also a commitment not to simply promote, but to continue an accountable dialog with our supporters.

So come follow us. Tell your friends. Tell your friends’ friends. By simply following @ChildFund we can all make a difference in a child’s life.

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