United States

‘If I Were President’…Children Have a Few Ideas

By Virginia Sowers, ChildFund Community Manager

For the past few years, the ChildFund Alliance (a 12-member organization that includes ChildFund International) has been asking children to tell us what they would do if they were president or the leader of their country. As you can imagine, 11- to 12-year-olds have some definite ideas.

As U.S. voters go to the polls today to elect the next president of the United States, we wanted to share with you some very good ideas for changing the world offered up by children who have a lot of important things to say when asked.

If I Were President…

child with siblings

“I would provide more libraries and more learning opportunities.” – Antonio, 11, St. Vincent and the Grenadines (Caribbean)

boy talking to an adult

“I would encourage education for every child and I would multiply school infrastructures in every village where there are maximum numbers of children of school age. This is good because when you are educated you can help yourself and your family. You can get a better job and can go to any part of the world.” – Ibrahima, 12, Guinea

boy eating lunch

“I would provide school supplies for children free of charge.” – Dhanushka, 11, Sri Lanka

boy sitting on planter

“I would build roads in far-away places as well as organize summer camps.” – Erick, 12, Ecuador

girl with goats

“I would create school canteens in order to give the opportunity to many pupils who live very far away from school to eat lunch. And I would provide pupils with school supplies, uniforms and [pay] fees.” – Jeannette, 12, Togo

girl at school

“I would take away all of the weapons so kids don’t get hurt.” – Shalma, 11, United States

girl tending plants

“I would provide  free education for all children between 6 to 18 years.” – Anushree, 11, India

To help these children and others like them achieve their dreams, and maybe one day grow up to be president, consider sponsoring a child.

U.S. Children Need Sponsors, Too

by Virginia Sowers, ChildFund Community Manager

child sponsorship in U.S.Although ChildFund is a global organization working in 31 countries, many people don’t realize that one of those countries is the United States.

Since 1952, ChildFund, partnering with local affiliate organizations, has provided sponsorships and programs for some of the poorest communities in the South, Southwest and Northern Plains.

Winter is an especially challenging time for children and families in western communities. When an ice storm hits in Oklahoma, it can debilitate a community for a week or more due to downed power lines. Rural roads become unsafe for travel. Adults can’t get to work, thus losing valuable income for food and necessities. Children can’t get to school, missing valuable learning time and peer interaction. In South and North Dakota the winters can last from September to May, with a small window of spring and summer.

This week, in the wake of a blizzard that is tracking across the U.S., parts of North Dakota and South Dakota experienced bitterly cold temperatures with wind chills as cold as 40 degrees below zero.

As the winter season drags out in the Dakotas, it becomes increasingly difficult for many families to afford the rising cost of propane to heat their homes. Water systems freeze. Pipes burst. Children sometimes lack winter clothing, or require support in obtaining warm coats and boots required for survival in the extreme weather conditions.

Although most ChildFund programs in the U.S. focus on after-school activities for children and youth, we have held emergency drives in the Northern Plains to provide water, food and other emergency aid when a bad winter storm hits. ChildFund area offices also act as advocates, linking communities with resources. As ChildFund services in the U.S. continue to expand, we are working with communities to strategically prepare for weather emergencies.

Sponsoring a child in the U.S. is a wonderful way to help. It costs $35 per month, which is a bit higher than for other countries in which ChildFund works due to higher costs of providing services here at home.

For more information about U.S. child sponsorship, call 800-776-6767, or visit the child sponsorship section of our website.  (FYI: We don’t show online photographs of U.S. children to protect their privacy and ensure their safety.)

How a Red Sweater Changed a Life

By David Hylton
Public Relations Specialist

31 in 31To kick off this blog series, which will crisscross the globe during the month of October, we start in our own backyard. One of the biggest myths about ChildFund International is that we only help children overseas. That couldn’t be more wrong. We’ve been providing aid to U.S. children for more than 50 years. In fact, our programs in the United States reach some of the poorest counties in Mississippi, South Dakota, Oklahoma and Texas.

In the U.S., we collaborate with grassroots organizations that have an intimate understanding of the local community and the needs of the children and families. ChildFund and its partners focus on programs such as physical fitness, diabetes prevention, after-school care, computer skills training, youth councils and neighborhood revitalization.

Joe Brings Plenty is a leading advocate for ChildFund's programs at the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota.

Joe Brings Plenty is a leading advocate for ChildFund's programs at the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota.

One of our U.S. success stories comes from former sponsored child Joe Brings Plenty in South Dakota. He is now a tribal chairman and a leading advocate for ChildFund’s programs that began in 2008 at the Cheyenne River Reservation.

“I want the youth today to have the experiences that I had,” he says. As evidence, he shows visitors a photo of himself as a boy wearing a red sweater. The photo was taken during his community choir’s visit to a local prison. As a choir performer, he was instructed to wear “something nice.” The red sweater, a gift from his ChildFund sponsor, was the only nice thing he owned. It was also the only Christmas gift he received that year.

Years later, Joe continues to be touched by what the sweater represented to him as a child growing up on a reservation. For him, the sweater is a symbol that people care about Indian issues and that they share the same values of compassion and generosity.

You can read more about Joe here. And for more information on our work in the United States, go here.

More on the U.S.
Population: 304 million
ChildFund beneficiaries: More than 58,000 children and families
Did You Know?: The first “American Indian Day” was declared by the State of New York in 1916, but a month-long recognition of American Indians was not achieved until 1990. Native American Indian Heritage Month is celebrated in November.

Next in our “31 in 31” series: Meet a kite maker in Indonesia

From Mississippi to L.A.: Former Miss USA Tells Her ChildFund Story

Shauntay Hinton, who was crowned Miss USA in 2002 and has appeared on TV shows such as “Heroes” and “Criminal Minds,” is a formerly sponsored child through ChildFund International. She was enrolled in the Brickfire Project in Mississippi and attended Brickfire’s after-school program until she completed high school.

This Sunday, Sept. 13, Shauntay will speak at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles as part of the celebration of our traveling toy exhibit, “The Power to Play – from Trash to Treasure.”

Today Shauntay shares her childhood memories with us:

Shauntay Hinton This week I attended a Labor Day barbecue hosted by my management company at a really elegant residence in Pacific Palisades, Calif., a community on the west side of Los Angeles. I looked around at the setting and the other “celebrities” there and felt like I was a really long way from Starkville, Miss.

In fact, when one of the other guests happened to ask me where I grew up, and I told her Mississippi, she responded “Wow! Really? How awful was that?” To which I replied “Not at all. I must have gotten lucky!”

I explained that growing up in Starkville, we had a strong sense of community. For example, when I was very little, I attended a day care center called Project Brickfire. Project Brickfire was a conduit organization for ChildFund International and operated as part day care center/part community center with programs to promote the educational and social development of children.

I went on to give her an earful about how before I even knew who Oprah Winfrey was, when I was about 5 years old, I was cast in a play at Project Brickfire as the host of a talk show who interviewed historical figures including Dr. Martin Luther King and Dr. George Washington Carver regarding their contributions to American History. And boy oh boy, did they create a monster!

Shauntay Hinton as a childI made my mind up to never know a life without being on stage in some capacity. So to make a long story short, I think I got my point across to that other guest – if I hadn’t grown up in small-town Mississippi as a ChildFund sponsored child, I might not have been standing there talking to her at some fancy shindig in lovely Pacific Palisades that afternoon.

With programs emphasizing the arts and creative expression like plays, field trips and guest speakers, even providing a pen pal from across the world, ChildFund International helped me develop self confidence in front of an audience early on. Without question, my start as a sponsored child was essential to shaping my path toward a career in broadcasting because of the encouragement, instruction and support I received from the staff of Project Brickfire.

To read more about Shauntay’s experience with ChildFund International, click here. For more on “The Power to Play,” visit www.ChildFund.org/toys. Are you a formerly sponsored children through ChildFund? If so, and you would like to tell your story, please send an e-mail to content@childfund.org with your information.

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