Vietnam

This Mother’s Day, Consider Helping a Mom

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund staff writer

Having children is hard work, no matter where you live and what kind of assistance you have available. But think of a mother living in a developing country. She may not be able to give birth in a hospital, and she may lack the proper nutrition that both she and her baby need to survive. As we prepare to celebrate Mother’s Day, here are some ways to show your appreciation for mothers who are striving to raise children in difficult circumstances. You even can give a gift in your own mother’s name if you’d like.

A Ugandan mother brings her child to a nutrition day in Budaka District. Photo by Jake Lyell.

A Ugandan mother brings her child to a nutrition day in Budaka District. Photo: Jake Lyell.

The Mama Kit, available through ChildFund’s Gifts of Love & Hope catalog, has supplies for a pregnant woman in Uganda to use during and after delivery, and qualified health professionals provide education for women to ensure safe birthing experiences. This is important because Uganda has a high infant mortality rate of 64 deaths for every 1,000 live births (2012), according to the CIA World Fact Book.  For $35, an expectant woman and her baby have a better chance to survive.

Another item in the catalog is medicine for children and mothers in Liberia, protecting them from parasites, malaria and low hemoglobin levels. For $50, you can help stock ChildFund-supported clinics, which are run by trained community health volunteers. Health posts bring vital medication and education to communities that would otherwise go without.

Vietnamese girls and mother

A Vietnamese mother and her two daughters.

The catalog features other gifts that make for great Mother’s Day presents. Mothers in Vietnam will benefit greatly from a small micro-loan of $137, which will allow them to start their own agricultural businesses. The income they earn provides food, clothing and educational opportunities for their children. In Honduras you can buy books for first-grade classrooms for only $9. When children learn how to read, the whole family benefits.

Mothers around the world want the best for their children. This Mother’s Day, consider helping a mom.

Reflections on Sponsorship: A Visit to Vietnam

Guest Post by Pete Olson

Pete Olson is an American Formula car racer in the Asia Formula Renault Series. Olson’s Race for Children campaign is to raise awareness around the issue of child poverty while encouraging fans to become child sponsors. Olson shares his recent trip to meet sponsored child Trang.

Me and Trang.

Trang, 11, lives in Vietnam.

After a decade of sponsoring various children through ChildFund, I finally made the decision to meet my sponsored child, Trang, and it was so worth it. Beyond the pictures and the letters from half a world away, my trip to Vietnam made my sponsorship experience that much more tangible. For the first time, I saw, in person, what my sponsorship had done for the little girl I’ve been communicating with over these past years.

To put it simply, meeting Trang is one of the most incredible things I’ve ever done.

My visit made me realize, more than ever, just how privileged I’ve been in my life. I have been very lucky to have so many opportunities, many of which I’ve taken for granted. The benefits my sponsorship are helping provide to Trang are things I’ve always been accustomed to having.

Meeting Trang's family.

Meeting Trang’s family.

For instance, I saw how ChildFund has helped build a medical center in the village to provide basic health care; they’ve built a fresh water system so the community doesn’t have to walk to a stream to collect drinking and cooking water; and they’ve installed toilet facilities in the village to provide access to basic sanitation. It was eye-opening to realize these standard amenities were previously nonexistent in this community. But I was more shocked to learn from a ChildFund representative that some children have to walk over the surrounding hills to get to and from school each day. That’s probably an hour hike over – and we complain about the Stairmaster!

We gripe so much about trivial things when so many of our basic needs are met. We only have to do a little comparison with those who lack those conveniences to realize how thankful we should all be for what we have and often take for granted.

Hanging out with Trang.

Trang and me.

It is a shame that there are so many inequalities in the world, but I know that I can do my part, no matter how small, to help children like Trang to improve their lives. I sincerely hope that through the Racing for Children program and my own personal efforts, we can find many more sponsors for children like Trang. If more people were moved in the way that I was last month in Vietnam, I have no doubt they would contribute.

I’m already looking forward to going back to visit Trang and her community. I am so glad I made the effort. To think that I have been able to help so much with what we Americans think of as so little – it is really something.

Formula One World Champion race driver, Aytron Senna said it best, “Wealthy men can’t live in an island that is encircled by poverty. We all breathe the same air. We must give a chance to everyone, at least a basic chance.”

Indeed it is our duty, and yet our privilege – we should all do our part. Help a child in need by becoming a sponsor through ChildFund International.

Driven by Compassion: Pete Olson’s Race for Children

By Loren Pritchett, ChildFund staff writer

Pete Olson

Pete Olson

In the 30 seconds it took him to watch the ChildFund commercial, Pete Olson, Formula car racer, knew he wanted to sponsor a child. The decision was quick, but he was no stranger to speed.

Fast forward more than a decade later and, today, Olson is supporting his third sponsored child and racing in the name of children in need. Behind the wheel, he is in control but admits that compassion is really what drives him.

“It’s an incredibly rewarding experience,” he says. “You can change a child’s life and give them opportunities that many of us take for granted.”

Opportunities like getting a quality education and receiving proper nutrition are among those Olson knew as a small child, adopted into a loving family. He credits his own success to his adopted parents’ support and saw sponsorship as a way to share his good fortune. He began sponsoring as a student at Boston University.

“I felt that many of us there were privileged and lucky to have the opportunities that we did,” he says. “It was a point in my life where I started to feel it was important to give something back for all that I have been so grateful to have in my life.”

Olson maintained child sponsorships while earning two degrees, a regional racing license and pursuing his passion for speed. He excelled from motorcycles to professional karting and eventually found himself racing in China – thousands of miles from U.S. tracks but only a few hundred from his sponsored child, Trang.

“She writes a lot about her schooling, which she really seems to enjoy,” he says. “That makes me very happy as I think education is something that we tend to take for granted back home. In many other countries, children don’t have the same opportunities for education.”

Trang

Trang, 11, lives in Vietnam.

Trang, 11, lives in Vietnam. In some rural areas of the country, children are discouraged from attending school because their classrooms are too far away. Other areas of the region lack clean drinking water and have inadequate sanitation facilities. With Olson’s support, Trang is able to attend school regularly and benefits from the various ChildFund health and nutrition programs in her community.

Pete in Race Car

Olson races for children in  the Zhuhai International Circuit, Asia Formula Renault Series

With a desire to help more children like Trang, Olson now races in the Asia Formula Renault Series and does so for children in extreme poverty. The ChildFund logo that shines from the side of his red Formula car is an invitation to all of his fans – sponsor a child. And although he aspires to be the first American to win the series this year, he knows this is much bigger than winning.

“I’ve stopped keeping track of the wins,” he says. “No matter what’s going on in my own life, I know without a doubt that in another part of the world I am bringing joy and happiness to a child in need, enriching their life and providing them with opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have.”

Olson plans to visit Trang soon to learn more about her family, community and where she goes to school. In the meantime, he continues his race for children.

Are you a racing fan? Catch Pete Olson September 15-16, October 20-21 and December 8-9. Check your local listings to find out how you can watch the races. Or stay updated on Facebook or www.peteolson.com. To learn more about sponsoring a child, speed over to the ChildFund website.

One Child in Vietnam

Guest post by Tom Greenwood via ChildFund Australia

Thao is an only child. She lives with her parents and grandparents and attends ChildFund-supported Vi Huong preschool.

child ready for nap

Children prepare for an after lunch sleep at Vi Huong preschool, Bac Kan province, Vietnam.

In Thao’s preschool class there are 15 children (12 boys and three girls). Altogether, there are 122 children in the preschool.

The preschool is a 2-minute walk away from her home. She likes it because she has friends there and she enjoys playing. Her favorite thing is the slide.

Thao’s mother, Yen, says: “I’m very happy because when Thao goes to school she has a chance to play with toys and meet her friends. It makes her more active and improves her knowledge. The teachers are so nice and kind. They consider the children like their own.

children eating lunch

A teacher serves lunch at Vi Huong preschool.

“I ask Thao about her day and she tells me what she ate. She says, ‘Mum, the food is really delicious!’”

Her favorite food is beansprouts and sweet rice.

Thao and classmates wash their hands.

When Thao grows up she wants to be a doctor so she can cure sick people.

She is one child in Vietnam who is already poised to make a difference.

Learn more about ChildFund’s operations in Vietnam and child sponsorship.

Connecting Children Through ChildFund

Courtesy of ChildFund Australia, a member of the Global ChildFund Alliance

A global education program called ChildFund Connect is promoting a sense of community and friendship among primary school children in Australia and their peers in developing countries.

Through a variety of multimedia tools, with a central website serving as a hub for communications and child-created content, the program facilitates cross-country exchanges and collaborative education projects to increase children’s understanding of the world.

One of those projects is Our Day, a film that documents a day in the life of children around the world. Using pocket video cameras, hundreds of children in Australia, Laos, Vietnam and Timor-Leste captured the detail and color of their day, providing incredible insights into their childhood experiences.

Filmmaker Clinton J. Isle took on the creative task of combining this footage to create Our Day. The film shows how daily life is very different, but, also, in many ways the same, in different parts of the world.

This project was supported by the Australian Council for the Arts, the Australian Government’s arts funding and advisory body and by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland. ChildFund Connect is also partly funded by Australian Aid, managed by ChildFund Australia on behalf of AusAID.

Take a few minutes to enjoy this absorbing film.

Around the Globe with ChildFund in 31 Days: Reducing Child Poverty in Vietnam

Reporting by ChildFund Vietnam

31 in 31 logoOver the course of January’s 31 days, we’re making a blog stop in each country where we serve children, thanks to the generous support of our sponsors and donors. Today we learn about ChildFund’s programs in Vietnam.

ChildFund’s operations in Vietnam began in 1995, and progress is being made through a variety of programs that reduce child poverty. ChildFund Vietnam primarily works in the health, education, child-protection, water and sanitation and livelihood sectors. “These projects make tangible improvements in the lives of children and the whole community,” says Deborah Leaver, ChildFund’s national director in Vietnam.

She points to several examples in the last fiscal year:

  • 32 preschool teachers and 47 primary teachers took part in peer training to enable them to retrain other teachers in child-friendly techniques.
  • 1,321 young people received vocational training in rice cultivation and pig-rearing techniques.
  • 5,000 children took part in 155 Children Clubs supported by ChildFund, which offer entertainment activities as well as learning spaces.
  • 2,000 secondary school students received health and HIV/AIDS education.
  • 5,426 mothers and caregivers engaged in maternity and child health training.
  • 2 healthcare centers were constructed, and 21 centers received new equipment.

In addition to focusing on the physical well-being of children, ChildFund Vietnam also emphasizes the emotional health of children. Children’s Clubs provide a safe meeting space and opportunities to learn new skills. As part of club activities, ChildFund uses child-to-child communication methods, teaching children about child rights and other issues that impact them. In turn, children then communicate information and their perspectives on these subjects to other children in the club, as well as to the community at large.

children in outdoor classroom“We see that more children are going to school and receiving quality health care and access to clean water; however, there are still many children who have yet to realize these rights,” says Leaver.

In 2012, ChildFund Vietnam will continue to ensure children are involved in the activities and decisions that affect their daily lives and their futures.

Discover more about ChildFund’s programs in Vietnam and how you can sponsor a child.

The World Needs More Toilets

pit latrine

A pit latrine in Ethiopia

Americans take their bathrooms for granted, but for 2.6 billion people worldwide, a toilet is a luxury. To raise awareness of global sanitation needs, Nov. 19 is designated World Toilet Day.

“Children often suffer the most because of limited access to clean water and poor sanitation,” said Sarah Bouchie, ChildFund’s vice president for program development. “Poor sanitary conditions lead to more disease and less food, and precious family income must be spent on purchasing water or dealing with the effects of illness.”

A toilet in Vietnam

Responding to water and sanitation issues is a primary component of ChildFund’s work to help children around the world.

Beginning in 2008, ChildFund helped Nam Phong, a village of 3,600 in Vietnam, construct latrines and water supply systems. Community members were also taught to adopt hygienic practices, which helped clean up streams and roads in the community.

In Timor-Leste, where 70 percent of people have no access to sanitary bathrooms, ChildFund built latrines, a community bathroom and provided hygiene training to children and families. In Afghanistan, we are partnering with UNICEF to teach children about sanitation and hand washing. ChildFund Afghanistan has assisted some 6,000 former IDPs (internally displaced people), refugees and vulnerable families lacking quality housing and bathrooms. We’ve provided building materials and a small economic incentive to help families construct a two-room house and latrine.

An initiative to install latrines in elementary schools in Mexico provides students privacy and protection, increasing their likelihood of staying in school. Girls in particular are less likely to attend school if there are no bathrooms.

“Improved sanitation in schools, better access to clean water and knowledge about how to prevent waterborne disease helps ensure the health and development of the world’s children,” Bouchie said.

Celebrate World Toilet Day and help flush out poverty.

ChildFund Vietnam Participates in Children’s Protection Workshop 2010

by Vuong Tuyet Nhung, ChildFund Vietnam

At the national children’s forum held in late August in Hanoi, the focus was on helping children who are the victims of bad treatment, abuse, violence, exploitation, neglect and trafficking.

Eighty-five children from 12 Vietnamese provinces attended the event. The vice-minister of the Vietnamese Ministry of Labour, War Invalids and Social Affairs (MOLISA) served as chair. ChildFund Vietnam worked with local government agencies in Hoa Binh and Bac Kan to select six children and two adult facilitators from our program sites to represent each province.

Prior to the main workshop, our staff conducted an overview training on child protection to help the children become more familiar with issues like child trafficking, bullying and corporal punishment, as well as the abuse types and trafficking situations that exist in Vietnam and the world.

During the workshop, children had intensive peer discussions about human trafficking, abuse and violence in their areas, identifying reasons and proposing solutions. They also had direct dialogues with MOLISA and the Coordinated Mekong Ministerial Initiative Against Trafficking (COMMIT) leaders to raise questions about these issues.

On behalf of their localities, the children also delivered powerful messages urging Vietnamese and Mekong regional leaders to combat human trafficking.

Among their calls to action:

  • “Please give us a free call! (a hotline to call if they know of a child in danger).
  • “Let children live safely in their houses. It’s our sweetest home in the world!”

Nguyen Hai Huu, director of Vietnam’s child-protection bureau, complimented the children’s confident presentations and communication skills. “Their messages amazed me much, with remarkable initiatives reflecting factual states in different areas,” he said.

Diem (second from left) joins a discussion on human trafficking.

“I’m so proud and happy to join in such a big event like this,” exclaimed Diem, a 14- year-old girl from the Bach Thong district. “As the leader of Bac Kan group, I encouraged all members in my group to contribute ideas in discussions.” She noted that the workshop helped her gain knowledge of children’s rights, child violence and trafficking. She also sharpened her teamwork and communication skills by working with children from other provinces.

“Now I have a better ability of defining violence cases around me. Before coming here, I thought it is nothing special if classmates beat each other or parents abused their children,” she said.

Five children who attended the August workshop in Hanoi will be representing Vietnam at the Mekong Youth Forum on human trafficking in Bangkok, Thailand, later this month.

Leading the Way for Children’s Safety

By Stephanie Brummell
Web Content Specialist

31 in 31With the support of ChildFund Alliance member ChildFund Australia, children and youth in Vietnam are working collectively to shape their futures. Today, we visit a youth-led club in Vietnam that’s changing the way children look at life.

As a club leader, 17-year-old Duc’s mission is clear. The boys and girls of the children’s club in the province of Bac Kan need to understand the dangers of swimming in their local streams.

Clubs in Vietnam allow youth to education children about the dangers they may face.

Clubs in Vietnam allow youth to education children about the dangers they may face.

“I like jumping into the stream from the bridge,” one young boy told Duc. “I’m not afraid; living or dying is a fate.”

Other children told Duc that even though they couldn’t swim well, or at all, they would still go to the stream, “because going with the group is so much fun.”

These worrisome reports gave Duc the opportunity to use skills he learned in leadership courses supported by ChildFund International to help youth educate younger children in their community to stay safe while still having fun. He also teaches them swim safety. As a ChildFund program participant, Duc learned about child-injury prevention, traffic laws and other topics related to child rights, as well as how to facilitate workshops.

The children’s clubs are initiated by the Child Protection Program of ChildFund Vietnam in support of enhancing a safe and healthy environment for children in less fortunate communities so that they may develop to their full potential.

“I like my club because I can play sports here,” says 12-year-old Luan. “I also like the lessons. I found the lesson about burn … very useful. Now I know more about burns.” 

To read more about Duc and the children’s clubs in Vietnam, click here. For more details about ChildFund’s efforts in Vietnam, where we have worked since 2005, click here.

More on Vietnam
Population: 86.9 million
ChildFund beneficiaries: More than 17,000 children and families
Did You Know?: Vietnam is the largest exporter of cashews in the world.

What’s next: We learn about orphaned children in Belarus.

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