water

Walking Three Hours for Water — If They’re Lucky

In this video shot by ChildFund videographer Jake Lyell in Emali, Kenya, we follow Isaac and his mother, Dora, on their trek to a freshwater spring more than three hours away on foot. If that weren’t tough enough, Dora explains that sometimes when they reach the spring, they find it’s gone dry that day. So, they walk three hours home with no water. This isn’t the only family living with such hardship. Check out the statistics. There are millions of people who don’t have clean running water in or near their homes.

“Without water, even if you have food in the house, you can’t cook. You can’t bathe or have something to drink,” Dora says. She hopes for a better life for Isaac, the only one of her four children who has survived.

Today is World Water Day, a great time to make a gift that will provide communities with wells, pumps and other sources of clean water. Too many people — just like Isaac and Dora — spend hours each week fetching water and carrying it home, if they’re lucky. We can help.

Clean, Fresh Water in India

boys washing dishes in India

Photos and Reporting by Rashmi Kulkarni, ChildFund India

World Water Day is next Tuesday, so let’s take a look at how Indian children have benefited from access to clean running water in their communities and schools. First, we see a group of schoolchildren from Udaipur, a city in western India.

One of the students, Kuldeep, says, “Before and after eating, we clean our hands and plates properly to stay healthy.” In the picture above, three boys — Mukesh, Lalu and Harish — wash dishes before lunch at school.

These girls in Orissa, India, don't have to walk far now to get clean water.

These girls in Orissa, India, don’t have to walk far now to get clean water.

Next, girls from Orissa, a state on India’s eastern coast, talk about how a water pump provided by ChildFund supporters has changed their lives.

“It’s our daily routine to walk to the hand pump, which ChildFund has provided through the gift catalog, to get water,” one girl says. “Otherwise, we had to walk for several kilometers to fetch water.”

One out of 10 people in the world do not have reliable access to clean water. That’s more than 663 million people, or twice the population of the United States! Astounding, right? That’s why we should do what we can to spread the word about providing everyone access to clean water. This World Water Day, share information with friends — and lead by example however you can. ChildFund has several options for you to make a difference for children and their family members who don’t have easy access to clean water.

 

Water’s Impact on Women and Children

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Aisha, 10, carries water back to her home in Uganda.

Aisha, 10, carries water back to her home in Uganda.

March 22 is World Water Day, a very important event for ChildFund and the countries where we work, so you’ll be seeing videos, pictures and stories about water during the next month. We don’t want to flood you (pun intended) with a lot of statistics all at once, but consider this:

In Africa and Asia, women and children walk an average of 3.7 miles a day just to fetch water.

This stat came from UNESCO in 2015, and the United Nations reported in 2013 that girls and women worldwide spend up to 6 hours a day collecting water because it’s one of their household responsibilities.

That’s a huge investment of time and energy, and it’s no wonder that children — girls, especially — suffer a loss of opportunity when their homes and schools don’t have clean water and sanitation.

According to UNICEF, one in four girls does not complete primary school, compared with one in seven boys. Water and sanitation are not the only reasons for this problem, but when girls do have access to clean water and private and safe toilets, they’re more likely to stay in school. Girls’ enrollment rates improved by more than 15 percent in some places after clean water and sanitation were provided.

Let’s think about these children’s needs this month and learn more about how we can help. You can start by reading the World Water Day website and watching this video about Aleyka, an Ethiopian girl who takes us on her daily journey to retrieve water. You may feel inspired to share your knowledge by the time World Water Day arrives.

A Solution for Much-Needed Clean Water

Video by Jake Lyell

We hope you’re having a great holiday weekend. Are you spending some time in the pool, like millions of Americans do during the Fourth of July? Take a moment and think about water a couple thousand miles away. It’s very hard to find clean, drinkable water in many developing countries, but a lot of people are working on the problem.

That’s why our corporate partner Procter & Gamble’s Children’s Safe Drinking Water program is so important. For a decade, P&G has provided their Purifier of Water packets to children in vulnerable communities around the world, including in seven countries where ChildFund works. In just a few minutes, a child has clean water to drink. Watch this video and see!

The Water Story of a District in Uganda

Photos and captions by Sharon Ishimwe, ChildFund Uganda

In the Kyankwanzi District of central Uganda, clean water is now available — in some places. The pictures here show the stark differences between villages with boreholes, water tanks, tip-taps and purifiers, and those that lack these resources. ChildFund Uganda, in partnership with corporate donor Procter & Gamble and local partner organization Community Effort for Child Empowerment, has worked to provide families with access to clean water. Those affected by HIV and AIDS are in the most need. Without fresh water in or near their homes, people are at greater risk of contracting waterborne diseases and are forced to walk great distances to bring home water.

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Washing the Germs Away

In La Paz, Bolivia, children are learning how to wash their hands thoroughly, as you can see in this video from the field. On March 22, we celebrated World Water Day, which highlights water’s important role in health, sanitation, agriculture, industry and education. When clean water is hard or impossible to access — as it is for 748 million people worldwide, according to the United Nations — the most vulnerable among us, including infants and children, tend to get sick and lose time at school, become malnourished and even die from preventable diseases. Making water available in communities and showing families how to protect themselves from diseases are two of ChildFund’s most important goals. Learn more about how you can help.

ChildFund Honored for Social Sustainability

ChildFund International’s corporate partner, Procter & Gamble Company, honored our organization with its 2014 Social Sustainability Partnership Award this week during the Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in New York City. ChildFund President and CEO Anne Lynam Goddard accepted the award on ChildFund’s behalf. For seven years, ChildFund has helped administer the P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water program, which provides safe water for families living in poverty and people living with HIV and AIDS. Recently, a ChildFund-supported community in Brazil received the seven billionth liter of clean water.

“ChildFund values our partnership with P&G and the company’s support in bringing clean drinking water to people across the globe,” said Goddard. “Improving access to clean drinking water is one the world’s most important needs. We look forward to continuing our work with P&G to increase the availability and sustainability of clean drinking water in developing countries.”

7 billion liters

Claudia’s family received Children’s Safe Drinking Water’s 7 billionth liter of clean water. Photo courtesy of P&G.

Soap and Water Keep Children Healthier

By Himangi Jayasundera, ChildFund Sri Lanka

“Soap and water, scrub, scrub, scrub,” hums Sashini as she washes her hands.

hand-washing activity

Children in Sri Lanka learn how to wash their hands thoroughly.

Like many of her friends, the 11-year-old did not bother too much with washing her hands properly before. Sometimes she and her friends would come home after playing outside or helping with paddy cultivation and wash their hands a little with water to get the mud and dust off. But now things have changed with a program organized by ChildFund Sri Lanka to promote proper hand washing, especially before meals.

Sashini was among 90 children age 6 to 14 who participated in the hand-washing program conducted at Mayurapada Kanishta Vidyalaya, a school in the Polonnaruwa district in north central Sri Lanka.

“We teach children about the importance of washing their hands, especially before meals,” says K.M. Chandralatha, a teacher. “But it happens within the classroom. This program was a practical experience in correct hand washing, and I think many of them got first-hand experience on the proper way to do it.”

Access to clean water is crucial for hand washing and other good hygienic practices.

The program commenced with an introduction to hand-washing day, followed by a practical demonstration by a science teacher, illustrating how harmful bacteria can be neutralized with the use of soap and water.

A midwife who works in public health taught the children good hand-washing techniques. “We talk regularly with parents on this subject, but we rarely get an opportunity to talk to children about the importance of hand washing,” says H.M. Chamali Piyaratne, the midwife. “It was a good experience, and I look forward to doing more sessions with children.”

Sashini adds that the program has helped many of her friends, who have in turn taught their younger siblings about proper hand-washing techniques.

“We were never taught to wash our hands like this before,” she says. “The experience of doing it with clear instructions has taught us how important it is.”

To further assist and promote hand washing and good hygiene among children, ChildFund Sri Lanka also provided two sinks to Sashini’s school.

 

Seven Billion Liters of Clean Water

By Kate Andrews, ChildFund Staff Writer

Seven billion liters of water: That’s a big number, one that’s hard to imagine. But it has made the difference to at least 39,000 people who might have lost their lives to waterborne diseases over the past 10 years.

7 billion liters

Claudia’s family received CSDW’s 7 billionth liter of clean water. Photo courtesy of P&G.

In 2004, one of ChildFund’s partners, Procter & Gamble, started the nonprofit Children’s Safe Drinking Water program, which provides packets of water-purifying powder to families in the Americas, Asia and Africa who don’t have reliable access to clean water. Recently, CSDW passed the milestone of delivering its 7 billionth liter of clean water, to a family in one of ChildFund’s programs in Brazil. ChildFund has helped distribute the packets. Seven billion liters equal one liter of clean water for every single person in the world, and CSDW estimates that the program has prevented 300 million days of diarrheal disease and saved 39,000 lives.

The program is part of P&G’s Clinton Global Initiative pledge to help save one life an hour by 2020.To celebrate the milestone, P&G has launched a social media drive now through April 22 (Earth Day). Every time you use the hashtag #7billionliters on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram during this week, P&G will donate an additional liter of clean drinking water. They hope to provide 1 million more liters this week!

“This new program is one example of why ChildFund values its partnership with P&G,” says Anne Lynam Goddard, ChildFund’s president and CEO. “Clean water means a disruption of poverty. Thanks to our partnership with P&G, not only are we changing lives in Brazil, but in many countries around the world, from drought-affected areas of Kenya to areas impacted by natural disasters in Indonesia and Mozambique.”

 

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